School of Teacher Preparation, Administration and Leadership (TPAL)

School of Teacher Preparation, Administration, and Leadership

The NMSU College of Health, Education, and Social Transformation’s School of Teacher Preparation, Administration, and Leadership (TPAL) is devoted to the preparation of master educators, administrators and leaders for public, private, and governmental institutions. Graduates are prepared to serve as teachers, directors of instruction and curriculum, subject matter specialists, supervisors of student teaching, educational leaders, and university professors. The School of TPAL offers multiple undergraduate and graduate degree programs and pathways within several academic units including Curriculum and Instruction, Educational Leadership and Administration, Special Education, and the Teacher Education Program. 

Vision

We serve the State of New Mexico, borderlands and global communities with socially responsive scholarship, innovative programs, and collaborative initiatives in education that foster and enhance the capacity of educators and communities to advance equity, democracy, and social justice in education and society.

Mission

As a School within a land-grant and Hispanic Serving Institution, we support and advocate for equitable education for all, especially historically marginalized and multicultural/multilingual communities and students with exceptionalities. We accomplish this through teaching, scholarship, public service, the preparation of teachers and leaders, and collaborations across the disciplines and with our constituents.

TPAL Undergraduate Programs

Freshmen Admission Requirements

First Steps – Admission to NMSU
In order to earn a license to teach, one must complete a bachelor’s degree, so the first step is to apply to the university and declare a major (Undergraduate Admissions).  Our undergraduate students are advised by the Center for Academic Advising and Student Support, and students have several choices of majors. To apply for undergraduate admission and to see complete admissions information, please see NMSU's Undergraduate Admissions page. First time freshmen are eligible for regular admission to NMSU if they are a graduate of an accredited high school and meet one of the following Freshman Admission Requirements listed below:

  • A cumulative high school GPA of 2.75, or
  • ACT composite score of 21 or SAT score of 1060, or
  • Ranked in the top 20 percent of their graduating class

Bachelor Programs with Teacher Licensure 

The primary function of the undergraduate programs in the School of TPAL is the preparation of licensed teachers for early childhood, elementary and secondary schools. This process includes a broad general education, professional education and teaching specializations.

Undergraduate Teaching Majors in the School of TPAL include the Bachelor of Science in Education with majors in:

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM (TEP)
Undergraduate teaching majors who approach the completion of 60 credits are eligible to apply for the Teacher Education Program (TEP). To complete the degree (and become licensed to teach), undergraduate students must be admitted to the competitive TEP. Applicants who successfully complete the minimum requirements for TEP admission must submit a professional portfolio to be reviewed by the TEP Admission Committee.

The following minimum criteria must be met:

  • GPA of 2.75 or higher
  • Earn a C- or better in TEP prerequisites (see the packet for complete list)
  • The candidate can apply to TEP as early as their 2nd semester of sophomore year. Candidates may submit their electronic portfolio during the semester in which they are enrolled in the last of the prerequisites.
  • Candidates need to have completed at least 60 credits to start TEP coursework but can apply when finishing the last of those 60 credits
  • The candidate must get a current degree check with a current date and signature from Dr. Margo Trevino-Torres in the College of Education Educational Support & Resource Center office in O’Donnell Hall #121 (call for an appointment – 575 646-3404).

The Undergraduate TEP Packet,  explaining the components of the portfolio that are necessary to be considered for admission by the TEP Admission Committee does not ensure admittance into any teaching program. Applicants are encouraged to develop a strong student portfolio, achieve the highest GPA possible and present the portfolio in a professional manner. Packets are also available at the Undergraduate Advisement Office of the College of Education, located in O’Donnell Hall, Room 121. Portfolio submission takes place twice a year 3rd Friday of September for the Fall and 3rd Friday of February for the Spring semester. For specific dates each semester, contact the Teacher Education Program office at (575) 646-2669 or the Undergraduate Advisement Office at (575) 646-3404. Applicants should be aware that admission to the TEP is competitive and admission is based upon available faculty resources.

STUDENT TEACHING
Student Teaching is the final semester of the degree, and is a requirement for licensure. Student Teaching (STEP) portfolios are submitted one semester prior to the actual student teaching semester, and students must be admitted to the TEP in order to apply for student teaching. STEP Portfolio deadlines are 1st Friday in October for fall student teaching and 1st Friday in March for spring student teaching. STEP Portfolios are submitted electronically to the Teacher Education Program (TEP) office. For more information, visit the Student Teaching website.

Non-Licensure Bachelor Programs

Two additional Bachelor degrees are available to undergraduate students who do not wish to obtain teacher licensure.

Bachelor of Applied Studies (Early Childhood Education Zero-Four Non-Licensure) 

There is an identified need for prepared educators to serve young children from birth to four years of age in settings outside of the public school in childcare centers, Head Start, and other agencies. The School of TPAL offers a non-licensure concentration, with the Bachelor of Applied Studies degree for the Zero to Four years old Early Childhood Tract. This non-licensure concentration serves private and public childcare, early intervention programs, and Head Start.

The entry requirements and early coursework for the ECED Licensure and ECED Non-Licensure tracts are identical. During the first two years of the ECED programs, students concentrate on their general education requirements while also taking early childhood education classes. This professional education component acquaints students with the psychological, social, cultural, developmental, and cognitive aspects of early childhood. Students also begin to take field experience courses with child study requirements. Once students reach the 60 credit threshold, they can either opt for the Licensure tract by applying to the TEP or continue on with the Non-Licensure coursework. 

Applied Studies students must complete all University degree requirements, which include: General Education requirements, Viewing a Wider World requirements, and elective credits to total at least 120 credits with 48 credits in courses numbered 300 or above. All ECED courses must be successfully completed with a grade of C- or better. Developmental coursework will not count towards the degree requirements and/or elective credits, but may be needed in order to take the necessary English and Mathematics coursework.

Bachelor of Science (Educational Leadership) 

The Bachelor of Science (BS) in Educational Leadership prepares students to work at the bachelor’s level in areas such as university or community college career services, admissions, financial aid, and advising. This program develops educational leaders who are passionate about strengthening their leadership to improve student achievement and helps foster positive and sustained relationships with students, institutions, school districts and surrounding communities. This is a social justice-driven program geared to strengthen leadership skills for individuals involved in various educational disciplines. The non-licensure degree will provide graduates with abilities to lead in all facets of higher education. The program offers an innovative, structured approach to leadership in higher educational programs.

Undergraduate Minors

In addition to the Bachelor degrees, the School of TPAL also offers the following three undergraduate minors:

School of TPAL Graduate Programs

The School of TPAL offers numerous graduate programs and pathways for post-baccalaureate students. The following programs are listed in the order of Master of Arts degrees, Graduate Certificates, and Doctoral degrees. 

Master of Arts Degrees

Master of Arts in Education 

  • MA/MAT in Education Programs Page (General information)
    • Master of Arts in Education Plus Licensure Concurrently (earn a teaching license in the areas of Early ChildhoodElementary or Secondary Education while earning a Master of Arts in Education degree)
    • Alternative Licensure
    • Master of Arts in Education (For licensed PK-12 teachers)
    • Master of Arts in Education (Non-Licensure)
      • Concentrations (for Non-Licensure):
        • Bilingual Education (BLED)
        • Early Childhood Education (ECED)
        • Education and Design with Learning Technology (EDLT)
        • Elementary Mathematics & Science Specialist (EMSS)
        • Multicultural Education (MCED)
        • Language, Literature and Culture (LLAC)
        • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

Master of Arts in Special Education

  • Master of Arts in SPED

Master of Arts in Educational Administration

  • Master of Arts (M.A.) PLUS Licensure Program in Educational Administration- PK-12 program
  • Master of Arts (M.A.) in Educational Administration – Community College and University Administration program

Master of Arts in Teaching
Concentration:

  • Spanish

Graduate Certificates

 Alternative Licensure

 Graduate Certificate in Education and Design in Learning Technology

 Visual Impairment Program

 Graduate Certificate in Autism

 Graduate Certificate in Autism 

 PK-12 licensure program

Doctoral Degrees

Doctor of Education

  • Educational Administration (with concentration areas):
    • PK-12
    • Higher Education & University / Community College

Doctor of Philosophy

  • Curriculum and Instruction (with concentration areas):
    • Bilingual Education
    • Multicultural Education
    • Early Childhood Education
    • Education and Design in Learning Technology
    • Language, Literature and Culture
    • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
    • Special Education
  • Educational Administration (with concentration areas):
    • PK-12
    • Higher Education & University / Community College

Degrees for the Department

Bachelor Degree(s)

Master Degree(s)

Doctorate Degree(s)

School of Teacher Preparation, Administration, and Leadership (TPAL):

Associate Professor, Rick Marlatt, M.F.A., Ph.D., Director, School of Teacher Preparation, Administration, and Leadership

Professors: Araujo, Baptiste, Haynes Writer, A. Hernandez, Osanloo; Associate Professors:  Fahrenbruck, Flores Carmona, Guillaume, Huerta-Charles, Marlatt, Parra, Rutledge, Salas; Assistant Professors:  Gray, Ibarra Johnson, Kew, Lucero, Matute-Chavarria, Neville, Pando, Pedraza, Schulz, Thomas, Warr, Wiegand; College Professor: Cifuentes; College Associate Professors:  Gorham-Blanco, Hannan, C. Hernandez; College Assistant Professors: Henderson, Mason, Moreno; College Instructors: Martinez-Griego, Owens; Emeritus Professors: Armendáriz, Cahill, Chavez-Chavez, Dominguez, González, Ivory, Reyes, Torres, Townley, Wiburg

B. Araujo, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University) - teacher education, social studies, bilingual education; H. P. Baptiste, Ed.D. (Indiana University) – science elementary; L. Cifuentes, Ph.D. (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) - learning and instructional design, educational technologies, collaborative learning; M.L. Fahrenbruck, Ph.D. (University of Arizona) – language, reading & culture; J. Flores-Carmona, Ph.D. (University of Utah) - culture and society, sociology of education; T. Gorham Blanco, Ph.D. (University of Wyoming) - mathematics education and pre-service teacher preparation; P. Gray, Ed.D. (University of Texas-San Antonio) - principalship, culturally responsive leadership, race and leadership; R. Guillaume, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University) - student development theory, biracial/multicultural identity development, higher education administration;   J.M. Hannan, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University) – distance education administration, best practices in teaching distance education, student services for distance education students; J.L. Haynes Writer, Ph.D. (University of New Mexico) – critical multicultural & social justice education, Indigeneity, Native American education teacher preparation; V. Henderson, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University)-teacher education; language, literacy, and culture; bilingual education; A. Hernandez, (Stanford University) – elementary literacy, sociolinguistics, biliteracy-multiliteracy, and teacher professional development; C.M. Hernandez, Ph.D. (Kansas State University) – science education; L. Huerta-Charles, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University) – multicultural/bilingual education; S. Ibarra-Johnson, Ph.D. (University of New Mexico) - bilingual education, bi/multilingual development, translanguaging pedagogy; K. Kew, Ph.D. (Boston College) – educational change and reform, educational leadership, school culture, micro-politics; L. Lucero (University of Texas-El Paso) – teaching, learning, and culture, with a concentration in math/science, technology/LGBTQ+studies; Barbara Martinez-Griego, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University) - Bilingual education/leadership/cultural and linguistic responsive education and practices, intersectionality; R. Marlatt, Ph.D. (University of Nebraska-Lincoln) - language, literacy and culture; L. Mason, Ed.D. (University of Northern Colorado) - visual impairment, orientation and mobility, literacy; M. Matute-Chavarria, Ph.D. (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) - special education, culturally responsive practices, and the intersections of race, disability, and family; Y. Moreno, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University) - low incidence disabilities, Autism, classroom management, and transition:  M. Neville, Ph.D. (Michigan State University) - secondary English, language, and literacy teacher education; equity-oriented curriculum and instruction;  A.F. Osanloo, Ph.D. (Arizona State University) – educational equity, educational leadership and policy, social justice leadership; critical race theory; A. Owens, Ph.D. (University of Texas at El Paso) - literacy/bi-literacy, educational equity in special education awareness for teachers and principals; A. Owens, Ph.D., (New Mexico State University) literacy/bi-literacy, educational equity in special education for learners and caregivers, teacher/administrator preparation related to early childhood/e.elementary, Glass Family Research Institute for Early Childhood Studies Director; M. Pando, Ph.D. (Texas Tech University) - bilingual education; J.L. Parra, Ed.D. (Pepperdine University) – online teaching & learning; technology integration; teacher/ faculty professional development, innovative & transformative education;  C. A. A. Pedraza, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University) - Asians and Asian Americans in higher education, reflexivity and positionality, racial and ethnic identity construction, and master narratives; D. Rutledge, Ph.D. (University of Colorado-Boulder) – learning technologies, international education, bilingual education/TESOL; L. Salas, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University) – bilingual and multicultural special education, early childhood special education; R. Thomas, Ph.D. (University of Missouri-Kansas City) - early childhood education, critical literacy; auto-ethnography; M. Warr, Ph.D. (Arizona State University) - teacher education, design, creativity, and technology; S. Wiegand, Ph.D. (University of Georgia) - autism spectrum disorder, early intervention, and professional development

Emeritus Professors
A.L. Armendáriz, Ph.D. (University of New Mexico - emeritus)– school administration, leadership development, organizational theory; E. Cahill, Ph.D. (Kent State University)– early childhood education, community education; R. Chavez Chavez, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University - emeritus)– curriculum theory, foundations, and multicultural education; R. Dominguez, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University - emeritus)- educational administration, higher education, community college administration, leadership development; M.L. González, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University)– leadership in public school administration, multicultural organizations; L.V. Reyes, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University - emeritus)– early childhood education and critical pedagogy; C.T. Townley, Ph.D. (University of Michigan - emeritus)– knowledge management, higher education; M. Torres, Ph.D. (University of New Mexico - emeritus)– critical theory, research as praxis; K. Wiburg, Ed.D. (International University - emeritus)– technology, learning design, mathematics education.

Early Childhood Education Courses

ECED 1110. Child Growth, Development, and Learning

3 Credits (3)

This basic course in the growth, development, and learning of young children, prenatal through age eight, provides students with the theoretical foundation for becoming competent early childhood professionals. The course includes knowledge of how young children grow, develop and learn. Major theories of child development are integrated with all domains of development, including biological-physical, social, cultural, emotional, cognitive and language. The adult’s role in supporting each child’s growth, development and learning is emphasized. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Incorporate understanding of developmental stages, processes, and theories of growth, development, and learning into developmentally appropriate practice. A.one
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the interaction between maturation and environmental factors that influence physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and cultural domains in the healthy development of each child. A.two
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the significance of individual differences in development and learning.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of how certain differences may be associated with rate of development and developmental patterns associated with developmental delays and/or specific disabilities. A.three
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of the similarities between children who are developing typically and those with diverse abilities. A.four
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of the many functions that language serves in the cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of development in the formative years. A.seven
  7. Demonstrate knowledge of the developmental sequence of language and literacy, including the influence of culture and home factors. A.eight
  8. Demonstrate knowledge of how children acquire and use verbal, non-verbal, and alternative means of communication. A.nine
  9. Demonstrate knowledge of the relationship among emotions, behaviors, and communication skills to assist children in identifying and expressing their feelings in appropriate ways. A.ten 1
  10. Use appropriate guidance to support the development of self-regulatory capacities in young children. A.eleven

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ECED 1115. Health, Safety, and Nutrition

2 Credits (2)

This course provides information related to standards and practices that promote children’s physical and mental well-being sound nutritional practices, and maintenance of safe learning environments. It includes information for developing sound health and safety management procedures for indoor and outdoor learning environments for young children. The course examines the many scheduling factors that are important for children’s total development, healthy nutrition, physical activity, and rest. May be repeated up to 2 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Recognize and respond to each child’s physical health, intellectual and emotional well-being, and nutritional and safety needs. B.one
  2. Articulate an understanding of indoor and outdoor learning environments that provide opportunities for children to put into practice healthy behaviors (physically, socially and emotionally). B.two
  3. Use appropriate health appraisal and management procedures and makes referrals when necessary. B.three
  4. Recognize signs of emotional distress, child abuse, and neglect in young children and use procedures appropriate to the situation, such as initiating discussions with families, referring to appropriate professionals,and, in cases of suspected abuse or neglect, reporting to designated authorities. B.four
  5. Establish an environment that provides opportunities and reinforcement for children’s practice of healthy behaviors that promote appropriate nutrition and physical and psychological well-being. B.five
  6. Provide a consistent daily schedule for rest/sleep, as developmentally appropriate. B.six
  7. Implement health care and educational activities for children and families based on health and a.nutritional information that is responsive to diverse cultures. B.seven
  8. Assist young children and their families, as individually appropriate, in developing decision-making and interpersonal skills that enable them to make healthy choices and establish health-promoting behaviors. B.eight

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ECED 1120. Guiding Young Children

3 Credits (3)

This course explores various theories of child guidance and the practical applications of each. It provides developmentally appropriate methods for guiding children and effective strategies and suggestions for facilitating positive social interactions. Strategies for preventing challenging behaviors through the use of environment, routines and schedule will be presented Emphasis is placed on helping children become self- responsible, competent, independent, and cooperative learners and including families as part of the guidance approach. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Apply knowledge of cultural and linguistic diversity and the significance of socio-cultural and political contexts for development and learning and recognize that children are best understood in the contexts of family, culture and society. A.six
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the many functions that language serves in the cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of development in the formative years. A.seven
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the relationship among emotions, behaviors, and communication skills to assist children in identifying and expressing their feelings in appropriate ways. A.ten
  4. Use appropriate guidance to support the development of self-regulatory capacities in young children. A.eleven
  5. Recognize and respond to each child’s physical health, intellectual and emotional well-being, and nutritional and safety needs. B.one
  6. Demonstrate knowledge and skill in building positive, reciprocal relationships with families. C.one
  7. Demonstrate knowledge of and respect for variations across cultures, in terms of family strengths,expectations, values, and child-rearing practices. C.four
  8. Demonstrate the ability to incorporate the families’ desires and goals for their children into classroom or intervention strategies. C.seven
  9. Demonstrate knowledge and skills in developmentally appropriate guidance techniques and strategies that provide opportunities to assist children in development positive thoughts and feelings about themselves and others through cooperative interaction with peers and adults. E.three 1
  10. Demonstrate understanding of the influence of the physical setting, schedule, routines, and transitions on children and use these experiences to promote children’s development and learning. E.seven 1
  11. Demonstrate knowledge of assessment techniques, interpretation of assessment information in the application of this

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ECED 1125. Assessment of Children and Evaluation of Programs

3 Credits (3)

This basic course familiarizes students with a variety of culturally appropriate assessment methods and instruments, including systematic observation of typically and non-typically developing children. The course addresses the development and use of formative and summative assessment and evaluation instruments to ensure comprehensive quality of the total environment for children, families, and the community. Students will develop skills for evaluating the assessment process and involving other teachers, professionals and families in the process. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 1110 and (ENGL 1110G or ENGL 1110H or ENGL 1110M).

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate ability to choose valid tools that are developmentally, culturally, and linguistically appropriate; use the tools correctly; make appropriate referrals; and interpret assessment results, with the goal of obtaining valid, useful information to inform practice and decision making. F.one
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of maintaining appropriate records of children’s development and behavior that safeguard confidentiality and privacy. F.two
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the educator’s role as a participating member of the assessment process as described and mandated by state and federal regulations for Individual family service plans (IFSP) and individual education plans (IEP). F.three
  4. Demonstrate understanding of the influences of environmental factors, cultural/linguistic differences, and diverse ways of learning on assessment outcomes. F.four
  5. Involve the family and, as appropriate, other team members in assessing the child’s development, strengths, and needs in order to set goals for the child. F.five
  6. Articulate an understanding of the distinctions and definitions of assessment concepts (e.g., screening, diagnostic assessment, standardized, testing, accountability assessment). F.six
  7. Apply understanding of assessment concepts toward selection of appropriate formal assessment measures, critiquing the limitations of inappropriate measures, and discussing assessment issues as part of interdisciplinary teams. F.seven
  8. Articulate an understanding that responsible assessment is legally and ethically grounded and guided by sound professional. It standards is collaborative and open with the goal of supporting diverse children and families. F.eight
  9. Demonstrate knowledge of assessment techniques, interpretation of assessment information in the Application of this data to curriculum development and/or intervention planning. F.nine 1
  10. Demonstrate knowledge of a variety of techniques and procedures to evaluate and modify program goals for young children and their families. F.ten 1
  11. Demonstrate knowledge and use of program evaluation to ensure comprehensive quality of the total Environment for children, families, and the community. F.eleven 1
  12. Use both self and collaborative evaluations as part of ongoing program evaluations. F.twelve

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ECED 1130. Family and Community Collaboration

3 Credits (3)

This beginning course examines the involvement of families and communities from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds in early childhood programs. Ways to establishes collaborative relationships with families in early childhood settings is discussed. Families’ goals and desires for their children will be supported through culturally responsive strategies. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 1110 and (ENGL 1110G or ENGL 1110H or ENGL 1110M).

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate knowledge and skill in building positive, reciprocal relationships with families. C.one
  2. Articulate an understanding of a safe and welcoming environment for families and community members. C.two
  3. Develop and maintain ongoing contact with families through a variety of communication strategies. C.three
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of and respect for variations across cultures, in terms of family strengths, expectations, values, and child-rearing practices. C.four
  5. Articulate understanding of the complexity and dynamics of family systems. C.five
  6. Demonstrate understanding of the importance of families as the primary educator of their child. C.six
  7. Involve families and community members in contributing to the learning environment. C.nine
  8. Demonstrate ability to communicate to families the program’s policies, procedures, and those procedural safeguards that are mandated by state and federal regulations. C.eleven
  9. Apply knowledge of family theory and research to understand family and community characteristics including socioeconomic conditions; family structures, relationships, stressors, and supports (including the impact of having a child with diverse abilities); home language and ethnicity. C.twelve 1
  10. Demonstrate knowledge of and skill to access community resources that assist families and contribute directly or indirectly to children’s positive development such as mental health services, health care, adult education, English language instruction, and economic assistance. C.thirteen 1
  11. Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills when working with children, families, and early care, education, and family support professionals. E.fourteen 1
  12. Demonstrate a commitment to leadership and advocacy for excellence in programs and services for young children and their families. G.six

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ECED 2110. Professionalism

2 Credits (2)

This course provides a broad-based orientation to the field of early care and education. Early childhood history, philosophy, ethics and advocacy are introduced. Basic principles of early childhood systems are explored. Multiple perspectives on early care and education are introduced. Professional responsibilities such as cultural responsiveness and reflective practice are examined. May be repeated up to 2 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Recognize signs of emotional distress, child abuse, and neglect in young children and use procedures appropriate to the situation, such as initiating discussions with families, referring to appropriate professionals, and, in cases of suspected abuse or neglect, reporting to designated authorities. B.four
  2. Demonstrate ability to communicate to families the program’s policies, procedures, and those procedural safeguards that are mandated by state and federal regulations. C.eleven
  3. Use both self and collaborative evaluations as part of ongoing program evaluations. F.twelve
  4. Demonstrate ability to adhere to early childhood professional codes of ethical conduct and issues of confidentiality. G.one
  5. Demonstrate awareness of federal, state, and local regulations, and public policies regarding programs and services for children birth through eight years of age. G.two
  6. Demonstrate understanding of conditions of children, families, and professionals; the historical and current issues and trends; legal issues; and legislation and other public policies affecting children, families, and programs for young children and the early childhood profession. G.three
  7. Demonstrate critical reflection of one’s own professional and educational practices from community, state, national, and global perspectives. G.four
  8. Demonstrate understanding of the early childhood profession, its multiple historical, philosophical, and social foundations, and how these foundations influence current thought and practice. G.five
  9. Demonstrate knowledge in technology resources to engage in ongoing professional development. G.seven

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ECED 2115. Introduction to Language, Literacy, and Reading

3 Credits (3)

This course is designed to prepare early childhood professionals for promoting children’s emergent literacy and reading development. Through a developmental approach, the course addresses ways in which early childhood professionals can foster young children’s oral language development, phonemic awareness, and literacy problem solving skills, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. . This course provides the foundation for early childhood professionals to become knowledgeable about literacy development in young children. Instructional approaches and theory-based and research based strategies to support the emergent literacy and reading skills of native speakers and English language learners will be presented. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 1110 and (ENGL 1110G or ENGL 1110H, or ENGL 1110M).

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the many functions that language serves in the cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of development in the formative years. A.seven
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the developmental sequence of language and literacy, including the influence of culture and home factors. A.eight
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of how children acquire and use verbal, non-verbal, and alternative means of communication. A.nine
  4. Develop partnerships with family members to promote early literacy in the home. C.eight
  5. Establish partnerships with community members in promoting literacy. C.ten
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of the reading and writing components of emergent literacy at each developmental level. D.four
  7. Provide and use anti-bias materials/literature and experiences in all content areas of the curriculum. D.seven
  8. Create and manage a literacy-rich environment that is responsive to each child’s unique path of development. E.nine
  9. Use a variety of strategies during adult-child and child-child interactions and facilitate communication and dialogue of expressive language and thought. E.ten 1
  10. Demonstrate a variety of developmentally appropriate instructional strategies that facilitate the development of literacy skills. E.eleven

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ECED 2120. Curriculum Development through Play Birth through Age 4 (PreK)

3 Credits (3)

The beginning curriculum course places play at the center of curriculum in developmentally appropriate early childhood programs. It addresses content that is relevant for children birth through age four in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IFSPs is included. Curriculum development in all areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children, birth through age four, is emphasized. Consent of instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 1110 and (ENGL 1110G or ENGL 1110H or ENGL 1110M).

Corequisite: ECED 2121.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Use appropriate guidance to support the development of self-regulatory capacities in young children. A.eleven
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of relevant content for young children and developmentally appropriate ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences for children from birth to four years of age. D.one
  3. Demonstrate the integration of knowledge of how young children develop and learn with knowledge of the concepts, inquiry tools, and structure of content areas appropriate for different developmental levels. D.two
  4. Adapt content to meet the needs of each child, including the development of individualized family service plans (IFSP) or individualized education plans (IEP) for children with diverse abilities through the team process with families and other team members. D.six
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of varying program models and learning environments that meet the individual needs of all young children, including those with diverse abilities. E.one
  6. Create environments that encourage active involvement, initiative, responsibility, and a growing sense of autonomy through the selection and use of materials and equipment that are suitable to individual learning, developmental levels, diverse abilities, and the language and cultures in New Mexico. E.two
  7. Create and manage inclusive learning environments that provide individual and cooperative opportunities for children to construct their own knowledge through various strategies that include decision-making, problem solving, and inquiry experiences. E.four
  8. Demonstrate understanding that each child’s creative expression is unique and can be encouraged through diverse ways, including creative play. E.five
  9. Plan blocks of uninterrupted time for children to persist at self-chosen activities, both indoors and outdoors. E.six 1
  10. Demonstrate understanding of the influence of the physical setting, schedule, routines, and transitions on children and use these experiences to promote children’s development and learning. E.seven 1
  11. Use and explain the rationale for developmentally appropriate methods that include play, small group projects, open-ended questioning, group discussion, problem solving, cooperative learning and inquiry experiences to help young children develop intellectual curiosity, solve problems, and make decisions. E.eight 1
  12. Demonstrate a variety of developmentally appropriate instructional strategies that facilitate the development of emergent literacy skills. E.eleven 1
  13. Demonstrate knowledge of assessment techniques, interpretation of assessment information in the application of this data to curriculum development of intervention planning. F.

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ECED 2121. Curriculum Development through Play Birth through Age 4 (PreK) Practicum

2 Credits (2)

The beginning practicum course is a co-requisite with the course Curriculum Development through Play – Birth through Age 4. The field based component of this course will provide experiences that address curriculum content that is relevant for children birth through age four in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IFSPs is included. Curriculum development in all areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children, birth through age four, is emphasized. Consent of instructor required. May be repeated up to 2 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 1110 and (ENGL 1110G or ENGL 1110H or ENGL 1110M).

Corequisite: ECED 2120.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Provide a variety of activities that facilitate development of the whole child in the following areas: Physical/motor, social/emotional, language/cognitive and adaptive/living skills. A.five
  2. Develop, implement and evaluate an integrated curriculum that focuses on children’s development and interests, using their language, home experiences, and cultural values. D.five
  3. Provides and uses anti-bias materials and literature, and experiences in all content areas of the curriculum. D.seven
  4. Create and manage inclusive learning environments that provide individual and cooperative opportunities for children to construct their own knowledge through various strategies that include decision-making, problem solving, and inquiry experiences. E.four
  5. Demonstrate understanding that each child’s creative expression is unique and can be encouraged through diverse ways, including creative play. E.five
  6. Plan blocks of uninterrupted time for children to persist at self-chosen activities, both indoors and outdoors. E.six
  7. Demonstrate understanding of the influence of the physical setting, schedule, routines, and transitions on children and use these experiences to promote children’s development and learning. E.seven
  8. Use and explain the rationale for developmentally appropriate methods that include play, small group projects, open-ended questioning, group discussion, problem solving, cooperative learning and inquiry experiences to help young children develop intellectual curiosity, solve problems, and make decisions. E.eight

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ECED 2130. Curriculum Development and Implementation Age 3 (PreK) through Grade 3

3 Credits (3)

The curriculum course focuses on developmentally appropriate curriculum content in early childhood programs, age 3 through third grade. Development and implementation of curriculum in all content areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health and emotional wellness, science, motor and social skills, is emphasized. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IEP’s is included. Consent of instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 1110, ECED 2120 and ECED 2121 (ENGL 1110G or ENGL 1110H or ENGL 1110M).

Corequisite: ECED 2131.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Use appropriate guidance to support the development of self-regulatory capacities in young children. A.Eleven
  2. Demonstrate the integration of knowledge of how young children develop and learn with knowledge of the concepts, inquiry tools, and structure of content areas appropriate for different developmental levels. D.Two
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of what is important in each content area, why it is of value, and how it links with early and later understandings within and across areas. D.Three
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the language, reading and writing components of emergent literacy at each developmental level. D.Four
  5. Adapt content to meet the needs of each child, including the development of individualized family service plans (IFSP) or individualized education plans (IEP) for children with diverse abilities through the team process with families and other team members. D.Six
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of varying program models and learning environments that meet the individual needs of all young children, including those with diverse abilities. E.One
  7. Create environments that encourage active involvement, initiative, responsibility, and a growing sense of autonomy through the selection and use of materials and equipment that are suitable to individual learning, developmental levels, diverse abilities, and the language and cultures in New Mexico. E.Two
  8. Create and manage inclusive learning environments that provide individual and cooperative opportunities for children to construct their own knowledge through various strategies that include decision-making, problem solving, and inquiry experiences. E.Four
  9. Demonstrate understanding that each child’s creative expression is unique and can be encouraged through diverse ways, including creative play. E.Five 1
  10. Plan blocks of uninterrupted time for children to persist at self-chosen activities, both indoors and outdoors. E.Six 1
  11. Demonstrate understanding of the influence of the physical setting, schedule, routines, and transitions on children and use these experiences to promote children’s development and learning. E.Seven 1
  12. Demonstrate knowledge of developmentally appropriate uses of technology, including assistive technology. E.Twelve 1
  13. Demonstrate knowledge of assessment techniques, interpretation of assessment information in the application of this data to curriculum development of intervention planning. F.Nine

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ECED 2131. Curriculum Development and Implementation Age 3 (PreK) through Grade 3 Practicum

2 Credits (2)

The beginning practicum course is a co-requisite with the course Curriculum Development and Implementation: Age 3 through Grade 3. The field based component of this course will provide experiences that address developmentally appropriate curriculum content in early childhood programs, age 3 through third grade. Development and implementation of curriculum in all content areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health and emotional wellness, science, motor and social skills is emphasized. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IEPs is included. Consent of instructor required. May be repeated up to 2 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 1110 (ENGL 1110G or ENGL 1110H or ENGL 1110M), ECED 2120, and ECED 2121.

Corequisite: ECED 2130.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Provide a variety of activities that facilitate development of the whole child in the following areas: Physical/motor, social/emotional, language/cognitive and adaptive/living skills. A.Five
  2. Develop, implement and evaluate an integrated curriculum that focuses on children’s development and interests, using their language, home experiences, and cultural values. D.Five
  3. Provides and uses anti-bias materials and literature, and experiences in all content areas of the curriculum. D.Seven
  4. Create and manage inclusive learning environments that provide individual and cooperative opportunities for children to construct their own knowledge through various strategies that include decision-making, problem solving, and inquiry experiences. E.Four
  5. Demonstrate understanding that each child’s creative expression is unique and can be encouraged through diverse ways, including creative play. E.Five
  6. Plan blocks of uninterrupted time for children to persist at self-chosen activities, both indoors and outdoors. E.Six
  7. Demonstrate understanding of the influence of the physical setting, schedule, routines, and transitions on children and use these experiences to promote children’s development and learning. E.Seven
  8. Use and explain the rationale for developmentally appropriate methods that include play, small group projects, open-ended questioning, group discussion, problem solving, cooperative learning and inquiry experiences to help young children develop intellectual curiosity, solve problems, and make decisions. E.Eight

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ECED 2140. Effective Program Development for Diverse Learners and their Families

3 Credits (3)

This course addresses the role of a director/administrator in the implementation of family-centered programming that includes individually appropriate and culturally responsive curriculum in a healthy and safe learning environment for all children and their families. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe important aspects of leadership that an administrator in an early childhood setting must demonstrate.
  2. Identify and describe ways in which classrooms can have a multicultural environment.
  3. Observe a classroom and identify, using photographs good practice with classroom environment.
  4. Describe important aspects of a good early childhood curriculum
  5. Describe how culture and socioeconomic factors influence classroom environment.

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ECED 2141. Effective Program Development for Diverse Learners and their Families Practicum

2 Credits (2)

Provides opportunities for students to apply knowledge gained from Curriculum for Diverse Learners and their Families in a practicum setting. Consent of instructor required. Restricted to ECED majors. May be repeated up to 2 credits.

Corequisite: ECED 2140.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the requirements to maintain and enhance the physical and mental health, safety, and nutrition components of a program: Demonstrate knowledge of facility management to include evaluation, maintenance, security, and meeting applicable codes; Demonstrate knowledge of planning for appropriate indoor and outdoor environments; Identify ways to support early childhood educators in the selection of appropriate materials and equipment for the environment; Demonstrate knowledge of the impact of the environment on children’s learning and development.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of early care and education curriculum that is individually, culturally, linguistically, and developmentally responsive: Describe a variety of curriculum goals and teaching strategies; Describe the importance of ongoing curriculum assessment and planning, and collaboration with teachers, families and community entities; Identify ways to support early childhood educators in curriculum assessment and planning.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of family/community involvement in effective program development: Describe the importance of supporting families as partners in early care and education program development; Describe both informal and formal communication systems with families that encourage information sharing and joint decision making; Identify strategies for resolving conflicts and supporting families with diverse backgrounds and parenting expectations; Identify the range of family needs including transitional periods; Identify within the community the network to support families with their special needs; Describe a “family friendly” inclusive philosophy
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of a director’s role as an educational leader in an inclusive setting: Describe what a director does in supporting the instructional component of the program for children, staff, and families; Identify resources that a director might use to keep current with information relating to the instructional component of the program; Describe ways to involve teachers in instructional decision making.

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ECED 2215. Program Management

3 Credits (3)

This course emphasizes the technical knowledge necessary to develop and maintain an effective early care and education program. It focuses on sound financial management and vision, the laws and legal issues that affect programs, and state and national standards such as accreditation. Consent of instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop a comprehensive program philosophy.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to develop systems that are effective for quality program operation.
  3. Create a program budget and understand the Income and Expense sides and what affects each part.
  4. Model best practices that integrate various leadership styles.

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ECED 2280. Professional Relationships

3 Credits (3)

This course addresses staff relations that will foster diverse professional relationships with families, communities and boards. Topics of staff recruitment, retention, support and supervision will lay the foundation for positive personnel, family and community relationships. Consent of instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Corequisite: ECED 2281.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Interview an administrator and write a paper describing personnel management, staff support, supervision, and professional development.
  2. Identify and describe ethical and legal requirements in maintaining a professional relationship with subordinates, the community, clients, and fellow administrators.
  3. Identify and describe technologies which may be used in an early childhood setting.
  4. Identify and describe legal and ethical considerations in the employment of others.

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ECED 2281. Professional Relationships Practicum

2 Credits (2)

Practical experience in the development of staff relationship that will foster professional relationships with families, communities and boards. Issues of staff recruitment, retention, support and supervision will lay a foundation for positive personnel management. Consent of instructor required. Restricted to ECED majors.

Corequisite(s): ECED 2280.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate knowledge of personnel management, staff support, supervision, and professional development within a diverse and inclusive organization: Describe methods for recruiting and retaining a diverse staff; Describe job descriptions for each position; Review a sampling of personnel policies and procedures; Review a variety of staff handbooks; Explain why on-going system of supervision should include regular meetings for professional goal setting, self-assessment, and feedback; Review program needs to effectively manage the work of the program including scheduling, covering ratios, initial orientation, in-service, staff meeting, etc.
  2. Demonstrate an awareness of appropriate communication and collaboration skills: Improve written and oral communication skills; Describe strategies for resolving conflicts; Explain how to promote consensus building as a decision making process.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge that promotes effective professional relationships with families, communities, and board members: Describe methods for demonstrating respect, understanding, and appreciation for all people; Identify the aspects of culture that facilitate relationship building among people; Describe how to build a common vision and develop long range program plans with parents, staff, board, and the community; Communicate program goals to visitors, prospective parents, volunteers, and board members; Describe how public relations and marketing strategies can impact programs; Review assessment tools that identify needs for early care, education and family support; Develop a personal professional development plan; Describe methods to work effectively with a board and advisory group.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of technology uses and skill acquisition: Describe how to use technology resources to engage in ongoing professional development and lifelong learning; Describe how you will use technology to communicate and collaborate in your leadership role

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ECED 3110. Research in Child, Growth, Development and Learning

3 Credits (3)

This advanced course in child growth, development, and learning builds upon the foundational material covered in the basic course in child growth, development, and learning. An integration of major theories of child development is provided by focusing on contemporary research in all aspects of development, including bio-ecological, social-affective, cognitive, language, and the methodological aspects of research in early childhood development and education. Restricted to ECED majors (TEP and Zero-to-Four) and ECED minors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 1110;.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Incorporate understanding of developmental stages, processes and theories of growth, development, and learning into developmentally appropriate practice. (I.A)
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the interaction between maturation and environmental factors that influence physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and cultural domains in the healthy development of each child

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ECED 3120. Family, Language, and Culture

3 Credits (3)

This course analyzes the interrelationships between family, language, and culture as connected to children's development and learning. In this course, language is understood as a human activity and higher mental process which build on the children's families, community, and cultural background. Restricted to: ECED majors (TEP and Zero-to-Four) and ECED minors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 1130.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Apply knowledge of cultural and linguistic diversity and the significance of socio-cultural and political contexts for development and learning and recognize that children are best understood in the contexts of family, culture, and society. A.6
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the many functions that language serves in the cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of development in the formative years. A.7

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ECED 3210. Emergent Literacy

3 Credits (3)

This advanced course is designed to prepare early childhood professionals to study literacy development, specifically oral language, writing and reading. This course focuses on children from birth through age 4, including children with special needs. Through a developmental approach, the course addresses: 1) recent theory and research that translates into practical strategies, assessment materials and preparation of rich literacy environments, 2) the socio-cultural contexts in which children develop literacy, 3) culturally, linguistically and developmentally appropriate literacy curricula, 4) processes used to determine the appropriateness of various literacy strategies, 5) assessment, evaluation, and accountability and 5) literacy leadership. Restricted to: Zero-to-Four majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 2115.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the developmental sequence of language and literacy, including the influence of culture and home factors. A. eight
  2. Knowledge of how children acquire and use verbal, non-verbal and alternative means of communication. A. nine
  3. Develop partnerships with family members to promote early literacy in the home. C. eight
  4. Establish partnerships with community members in promoting literacy. C.ten
  5. Knowledge of the language, reading and writing components of emergent literacy at each developmental level. D. four
  6. Create and manage a literacy-rich environment that is responsive to each child’s unique path of development. E. nine
  7. Use a variety of language strategies during adult-child and child-child interactions and facilitate dialogue of expressive language and thought. E. ten
  8. A variety of developmentally appropriate instructional strategies that facilitate the development of emergent literacy skills. E. eleven
  9. Demonstrate and facilitate conceptual understanding of family roles in the development of their infant and toddler, including support for family acquisition of knowledge concerning infant and toddler’s growth, learning and development and cultural and linguistic diversity represented within the home setting. H. one 1
  10. Apply theoretical knowledge f and ability to provide screening and assessment unique for infants and toddlers. H. two 1
  11. Articulate and demonstrate conceptual understanding of respectful, responsive, and reciprocal interactions that serve as basis for infant/toddler curriculum and learning environments. H. five 1
  12. An understanding and applications of flexible teaching approaches that span a continuum from child-initiated to adult-directed and from free exploration to scaffolded support or teacher modeling. I. three 1
  13. Link child characteristics, needs, and interests with informal opportunities to build children’s language, concept development, and skills. I. five 1
  14. Establish priorities for high-quality and meaningful language and pre-literacy experiences across the developmental continuum, using language, pre-reading and pre-writing to facilitate skill development while strengthening children’s cultural identity. I. eleven 1
  15. Knowledge of second- language acquisition and bilingualism including the diversity of home language environments. I. tweleve Conceptual knowledge of the principles and standards derived from professional organizations for curriculum decision- making. I. fifteen

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ECED 3996. Special Topics

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Each course will be identified by a qualifying subtitle. A maximum of 3 credits in any one semester and a grand total of 6 credits. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of an ECED topic.

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ECED 4110. Young Children with Diverse Abilities

3 Credits (3)

Addresses competencies for working with young children with exceptionalities, ages three-eight, and their families. Public school, private school, Head Start and other models are included. Taught with ECED 5110. Restricted to ECED majors (TEP and Zero-to-Four) and ECED Minors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 3105.

Corequisite: ECED 4120.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the significance of individual differences in development and learning.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of how certain differences may be associated with rate of development and developmental patterns associated with developmental delays or specific disabilities.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the similarities between children who are developing typically and those with diverse disabilities.

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ECED 4120. Assessment of Young Children, Birth-Eight

3 Credits (3)

Covers instruments and procedures for assessing young children and their families in order to determine atypical development. Screening, diagnosis, program planning, placement and evaluation issues are covered. Restricted to ECED Majors (TEP and Zero-to-Four) and ECED Minors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 3105.

Corequisite: ECED 4110.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the technical aspects of early childhood assessments
  2. Conduct and utilize assessments
  3. Collaborate with other professionals

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ECED 4210. Integrated Early Childhood Curriculum

4 Credits (4)

This advanced course focuses on developmentally appropriate content, learning environments, and curriculum implementation for children birth through age 4. It emphasizes integration of content areas (the arts, literacy, math, health/emotional wellness, science, social studies, motor, and adaptive living skills) and the development of rich learning environments for infants, toddlers, and preschool children. Restricted to: Zero-to-Four majors. May be repeated up to 4 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 1115, ECED 2120, ECED 2121, ECED 2130, ECED 2131, ECED 2110, and ECED 1120.

Corequisite: ECED 4211.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop, implement and evaluate an integrated curriculum that focuses on children’s development and interests, using their language, home experiences, and cultural values. D.five
  2. Create and manage inclusive learning environments that provide individual and cooperative opportunities for children to construct their own knowledge through various strategies that include decision-making, problem solving, and inquiry experiences. E.four

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ECED 4211. Integrated Curriculum Practicum

2 Credits (2)

The advanced practicum course is a field based course that will provide opportunities for the integration of content areas (the arts, literacy, math, health/emotional wellness, science, social studies, motor, and adaptive living skills) and the development of rich learning environments for infants, toddlers, and preschool children. Restricted to Zero-to-Four majors. May be repeated up to 2 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 1115, ECED 2120, ECED 2121, ECED 2130, ECED 2131, ECED 2110, ECED 1120.

Corequisite: ECED 4210.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop, implement and evaluate an integrated curriculum that focuses on children’s development and interests, using their language, home experiences, and cultural values. D.five
  2. Create and manage inclusive learning environments that provide individual and cooperative opportunities for children to construct their own knowledge through various strategies that include decision-making, problem solving, and inquiry experiences. E.four
  3. Demonstrate understanding of the influence of the physical setting, schedule, routines, and transitions on children and use these experiences to promote children’s development and learning. E.seven
  4. Use and explain the rationale for developmentally appropriate methods that include play, small group projects, open-ended questioning, group discussion, problem solving, cooperative learning and inquiry experiences to help young children develop intellectual curiosity, solve problems, and make decisions. E.eight
  5. Demonstrate an understanding and application of flexible teaching approaches that span a continuum from child-initiated to adult-directed and from free exploration to scaffolded support or teacher modeling. I.three

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ECED 4220. Advanced Caregiving for Infants and Toddlers

3 Credits (3)

The advanced field-based course is intended to assist students to define and implement advanced elements of quality programming for all infants, toddlers in safe, healthy, responsive caring environments. The experiences in the approved setting will support strong nurturing relationships, cultural competence, diverse learning needs and styles of every child, appropriate guidance techniques and partnership with the families, cultures, and community represented. Students are assisted through the course in advancing their ability to observe, discuss, and implement elements of quality programming for infants and toddlers in home, small-group or whole-group care situations. Restricted to: Zero-to-Four majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 2120 and ECED 2121; ECED 2130 and ECED 2131.

Learning Outcomes
  1. The primary goal of your participation in this course is to develop an increased understanding of infant/toddler (Birth through age three) development and developmentally appropriate care/education practices.

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ECED 4250. Teaching and Learning Math and Science

4 Credits (4)

Standards, principles, and practices in teaching mathematics and science to young children in preschool through grade 3. An emphasis is placed on developing a content-rich integrated math and science curriculum that focuses on children's development and interests, includes appropriate content, processes, environment, and materials with an emphasis on problem-solving as the major means of constructing basic concepts. Field experience required. Restricted to: TEP-ECED majors. May be repeated up to 4 credits.

Corequisite: ECED 4310, ECED 4260, ECED 4320.

Learning Outcomes
  1. The arithmetic of real numbers and their subsets of rational numbers, integers, and whole numbers including a large repertoire of interpretations of the four basic operations and ways they can be applied, and an understanding of place value and its implications for ordering numbers and estimation. H.two.a.i
  2. Three dimensional geometry based on the concept of distance, and two dimensional geometry as a method of drawing plans and representing three dimensional objects H.two.a.ii
  3. Measurement of length, perimeter, area, time, weights, and temperature H.two.a.iii
  4. Handling money problems such as cost and unit price. H two.a.iv
  5. Demonstrate understanding and skill in the constructions of solids, measurements of their volumes and surface areas, drawing their projections, and making plans for their construction; defining relevant variables and writing formulas describing their relationships in problem-solving activities; and using measurement tools and appropriate techniques for recording data and displaying results. H two.b
  6. Facilitate curriculum with open-ended activities that promote children’s expansion of the material learned, and in which children learn to use a variety of mathematical skills and concepts, including problem solving, reasoning, and logic. H.two.c
  7. Provide opportunities for children to learn how to use tools, technology, and manipulatives in problem solving. H two.d
  8. Establish a classroom environment of respect for cultural diversity and gender equity in which all children develop skills in communicating, discussing, and displaying mathematical ideas. H two.e
  9. Demonstrate understanding and apply the fundamental concepts in the subject matter of science including physical, life, and earth and space sciences as well as concepts in science and technology, science in personal and social perspectives, the history and nature of science, the unifying concepts of science, and the inquiry process scientists use in discovery of new knowledge to build a base for scientific inquiry. H two.a 1
  10. Apply the scientific method to develop children’s abilities to identify and communicate a problem, and to design, implement, and evaluate a solution. H three.b 1
  11. Demonstrate the ability to integrate a variety of technologies into planned science activities. H three.c 1
  12. Establish a classroom environment of respect for cultural diversity and gender equity where all children participate fully in science learning. H three.d Support play in young children’s learning and development from age Pre-K-grade three. I.six 1
  13. Demonstrate sound knowledge and skills in using technology as a teaching and learning tool. I.seven 1
  14. Demonstrate the ability to analyze and critique early childhood curriculum experiences in terms of the relationship of the experiences to the research base and professional standards. I.nine 1
  15. Facilitate family involvement so that families are engaged with curriculum planning, assessing of children’s learning, and planning for children’s transitions to new programs. I.twelve 1
  16. Demonstrate conceptual knowledge of the principles and standards derived from professional content organizations (zero to three, NAEYC, DEC) for curriculum-decision making. I.thirteen 1
  17. Demonstrate the use of reflective practice. I.fourteen

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ECED 4260. Teaching and Learning Social Studies, Fine Arts and Movement

3 Credits (3)

The course focuses on the aims, scope, and integration of methods of teaching social studies, the fine arts and movement across the curriculum. This course emphasizes an integrated approach to teaching the what and why of social studies; assessing student learning; planning units, lessons, and activities; effective instructional strategies; and knowledge of social studies content. Concepts of expressive art include the visual arts, music, movement and drama. Restricted to: TEP-ECED majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Corequisites: ECED 4310, ECED 4250, ECED 4320.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of teaching and learning processes that underscore social studies concepts and can translate these into meaningful learning activities focusing on inquiry, authenticity, and collaboration. H.four.a
  2. Demonstrate understanding that social studies encompass history, geography, anthropology, archeology, economics, political science, psychology, sociology, and the interdisciplinary relationship of all facets of social studies. H.four.b
  3. Demonstrate understanding that the definition of social studies requires that children be socially aware of and are active participants in local, state, national, and global issues; and that children recognize and respect diverse local and global perspectives concerning cultures other than their own. H.four.c
  4. Implement a variety of teaching strategies to assist children to use multiple resources including primary (e.g., documents, artifacts/regalia, direct observation, human resources, personal background) and secondary (e.g., books, newspapers, internet) as part of the inquiry/research process. H.four.d
  5. Create curriculum experiences that provide opportunities for children to appreciate the historical development of democratic values, institutions, nations, and cultures. H.four.e
  6. Demonstrate the ability to plan for and engage children in activities that require them to formulate, analyze, synthesize, and critique issues by using well-reasoned, clearly supported arguments, policies, and positions. H.four.f
  7. Demonstrate the ability to plan for and engage children in the presentation of social studies knowledge using a variety of sign systems including writing, charts, graphs, maps, art, music, drama, dance, and technology. H.four.g
  8. Demonstrate an understanding and implementation of arts activities such as history, art making, appreciation, and criticism through dance, music, theater, and the visual arts, appropriate to young children’s developmental levels interests. H.five.
  9. Demonstrate knowledge of the distinctions, connections, and integration between arts disciplines and arts experiences and encourages study and active participation that leads to skill development and appreciation. H.five.b 1
  10. Facilitate curriculum in which children communicate at a basic level in the four (4) art disciplines of dance, music, theater, and visual arts, including knowledge and skills in the use of basic vocabularies, materials, tools, techniques, and thinking processes of each discipline. H.five.c 1
  11. Create a classroom environment with exemplary works of art from a variety of cultures and historical periods and provide opportunities for students to discuss and respond to them. H.five.d 1
  12. Demonstrate an understanding of motor skill development in young children and apply knowledge of age and developmentally appropriate psychomotor and cognitive activities. H.five.e 1
  13. Create and use appropriate instructional cues and prompts for motor skills, rhythms, and physical activity. H.five.f 1
  14. Apply an understanding of child development knowledge coupled with child performance data to make informed instructional decisions. H.five.g 1
  15. Support play in young children’s learning and development from age Pre-K - grade three. I.six 1
  16. Demonstrate sound knowledge and skills in using technology as a teaching and learning tool. I.seven 1
  17. Demonstrate the ability to analyze and critique early childhood curriculum experiences in terms of the relationship of the experiences to the research base and professional standards. I.nine 1
  18. Facilitate family involvement so that families are engaged with curriculum planning, assessing of children’s learning, and planning for children’s transitions to new programs. I.tweleve 1
  19. Demonstrate conceptual knowledge of the principles and standards derived from 139 professional content organizations (zero to three, NAEYC, DEC) for curriculum decision making. I.thirteen 2
  20. Demonstrate the use of reflective practice. I.fourteen

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ECED 4310. Early Primary Field Placement

2 Credits (4P)

The field practicum is a co-requisite course with Teaching and Learning Reading and Writing; Teaching and Learning Math and Science; Teaching and Learning Social Studies, Fine Arts and Movement. The field based component will provide experiences that address curriculum content and practice teaching that is relevant for early primary children in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways. Graded: S/U Grading (S/U, Audit). Restricted to: TEP-ECED majors. May be repeated up to 2 credits.

Corequisite: ECED 4250, ECED 4260, ECED 4320.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively with educational assistants, volunteers, and others to individualize the curriculum and to meet program goals.
  2. Demonstrate skill in collaboration with professionals from other disciplines (e.g., mental health, psychology, speech and language) when planning curriculum and teaching strategies for young children with diverse abilities.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding and application of flexible teaching approaches that span a continuum from child-initiated to an adult-directed and from free exploration to scaffolded support or teacher modeling.
  4. Apply an understanding of young children’s need for balance, order, depth, variety, and challenge through curriculum planning, routines, and scheduling (e.g., daily, weekly, and longer-term).
  5. Link child characteristics, needs, and interests with informal opportunities to build children’s language, concept development, and skills.
  6. Apply knowledge to create environments that enrich and extent children’s play including intervention strategies (i.e., questioning), respect of cultural diversity and gender equity. Support play in young children’s learning and development from age Pre-K - grade three.
  7. Demonstrate the ability to promote positive social interactions and engage children in learning activities while actively working to increase social and emotional competence of all children.
  8. Demonstrate the ability to analyze and critique early childhood curriculum experiences in terms of the relationship of the experiences to the research base and professional standards.
  9. Facilitate family involvement so that families are engaged with curriculum planning, assessing of children’s learning, and planning for children’s transitions to new programs. 1
  10. Demonstrate conceptual knowledge of the principles and standards derived from professional content organizations (zero to three, NAEYC, DEC) for curriculum-decision making. Demonstrate the use of reflective practice.

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ECED 4320. Teaching and Learning Reading and Writing

3 Credits (3)

The foundation of this course is on understanding the reading process including the relationship between reading, writing, listening, and speaking; individual needs and abilities in reading instruction; and how to organize classrooms and select materials to support literacy development. Concepts of phonemic awareness, phonic instruction, vocabulary development, fluency and comprehension are integrated with the developmentally appropriate use of authentic assessment techniques, language/literacy immersion, and multicultural children's literature. Restricted to: TEP-ECED majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 2115.

Corequisite: ECED 4310, ECED 4250, ECED 4260.

Learning Outcomes
  1. This course will focus on the following New Mexico early childhood teacher education competencies and New Mexico State University’s conceptual framework for teacher preparation.
  2. Articulate an understanding of developmental theories and processes and their implications for appropriate methods of teaching reading in the K-third grade classroom.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of various instructional approaches and strategies for promoting literacy within an integrated curriculum framework.
  4. Provide and use anti-bias literacy materials and experiences, including primary language materials.
  5. Plan appropriate whole group, small group, and individual activities that include appropriate accommodations for working with children with special needs.
  6. Understand and articulate the concept of emergent literacy and the processes toward becoming an authentic reader and writer.
  7. Understand the role of family in literacy development.
  8. Respect and promote the use of the child’s home language for learning.
  9. Demonstrate knowledge of, and use effectively, a wide range of literacy assessment strategies and instruments to determine a child’s strengths and areas of need. 1
  10. Engage in reflection on current theoretical perspectives on the reading process and the role of print literacy in schools and our society. Our focus will be on rigorous inquiry about literacy education in U.S. schools and methods of literacy instruction. We will be examining how invisible cultural, historical, political, and social contexts have influenced and continue to influence teachers and schools. In your observations of reading and literacy education in your field experience it is critical that you become aware of these subtle but pervasive influences. To achieve this, we will focus our inquiry this semester on the following questions: What is literacy in early childhood education? ; Is that different from literacy outside of school?; How do young children use and pursue literacy? How do I promote literacy for all the children with whom I work?

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ECED 4810. Student Teaching/Seminar Early Childhood

3 Credits (3)

Discussion of early childhood school issues related to student teaching. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Synthesis of knowledge and skills appropriate to teaching in PreK - 3rd grade educational settings.

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ECED 4996. Topics

3 Credits (3)

Offered under various subtitles which indicate the subject matter to be covered. May be repeated up to 9 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of an ECED topic.

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ECED 4998. Field Experience (Infants Pre-K)

1 Credit (1)

Supervised field experiences in early childhood settings: infants, toddlers, and pre-K programs. May be repeated up to 1 credit.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in an ECED field experience.

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ECED 5110. Working with Young Children with Special Needs, Ages 3-8

3 Credits (3)

Addresses competencies for working with young children with exceptionalities, ages three eight, and their families. Public school, private school, Head Start and other models are included. Taught with ECED 4110 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the significance of individual differences in development and learning.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of how certain differences may be associated with rate of development and developmental patterns associated with developmental delays or specific disabilities. A.three
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the similarities between children who are developing typically and those with diverse disabilities. A.four
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of how children acquire and use verbal, non-verbal, and alternative means of communication. A.nine
  5. Demonstrate understanding of the importance of families as the primary educator of their child. C.six
  6. Demonstrate the ability to incorporate the families’ desires and goals for their children into classroom or intervention strategies. C.seven
  7. Demonstrate ability to communicate to families the program’s policies, procedures, and those procedural safeguards that are mandated by state and federal regulations. C.eleven
  8. Apply knowledge of family theory and research to understand family and community characteristics including socioeconomic conditions, family structures, relationships, stressors, and supports (including the impact of having a child with divers abilities), home language, and ethnicity. C.tweleve
  9. Adapt content to meet the needs of each child, including the development of individualized family service programs (IFSP) or individualized education programs (IEP) for children with diverse abilities through the team process with families and other team members. D.six 1
  10. Create environments that encourage active involvement, initiative, responsibility, and a growing sense of autonomy through the selection and use of materials and equipment that are suitable to individual learning, developmental levels, diverse abilities, and the language and cultures in New Mexico. E.two 1
  11. Create and manage inclusive learning environments that provide individual and cooperative opportunities for children to construct their own knowledge through various strategies that include decision-making, problem solving, and inquiry experiences. E.four 1
  12. Demonstrate knowledge of developmentally appropriate uses of technology, including assistive technology. E.tweleve 1
  13. Demonstrate knowledge of maintaining appropriate records of children’s development and behavior that safeguards confidentiality and privacy. F.two 1
  14. Demonstrate knowledge of the educator’s role as a participating member of the assessment process as described and mandated by state and federal regulations for individual family service programs (IFSP) and individual service programs (IEP). F.three 1
  15. Articulate an understanding that responsible assessment is legally and ethically grounded and guided by sound professional standards. It is collaborative and open with the goal of supporting diverse children and families. F.eight 1
  16. Demonstrate knowledge of a variety of techniques and procedures to evaluate and modify program goals for young children and their families. F.ten 1
  17. Demonstrate ability to work collaboratively as an advocate with families and IFSP and IEP team members to provide developmentally supportive environments. H.three 1
  18. Demonstrate content knowledge (e.g., art, music, movement, science, math, literacy, social studies, and technology) and familiarity with a wide variety of resources in academic disciplines and apply that knowledge in the development, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum. I.one

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ECED 5120. Assessment of Young Children, Birth Eight

3 Credits (3)

Covers instruments and procedures for assessing young children and their families in order to determine atypical development. Screening, diagnosis, program planning, placement and evaluation issues are covered. Same as ECED 4120. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ECED 5110 or consent of instructor.

Learning Outcomes
  1. UNDERSTAND THE TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF EARLY CHILDHOOD ASSESSMENTS -Define and understand the benefits and concerns of assessment, types of assessment, and best practices for early childhood assessments and their targeted populations.
  2. CONDUCT AND UTILIZE ASSESSMENTS- Demonstrate proficiency in using a variety of assessment tools to: screen children; assess current skill levels; determine strengths and weaknesses; supplement assessments when warranted; and incorporate data for instructional plans.
  3. COLLABORATE WITH OTHER PROFESSIONALS – Utilize transdisciplinary practices with all vested participants when conducting screenings, evaluations, and making recommendations.
  4. COLLABORATE WITH FAMILIES- Demonstrate proficiency in obtaining information from parents about their expectations, needs, and priorities when assessing and making early childhood instructional recommendations.
  5. EVALUATE PROGRAMS- Implement best practices in program design, advocate for children’s services, and articulate/safeguard student IFSP/IEPs according to each child’s developmental needs.

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ECED 5130. Working with Parents of Young Children

3 Credits (3)

Techniques for setting up home and classroom visitations, communicating with parents, and establishing special programs. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate a deep understanding of the theory, philosophy and goals of multicultural education
  2. Develop a knowledge base of the essential concepts to address language, culture, class, gender, and exceptionalities within the theoretical constructs of multicultural education.
  3. Develop a personal and social astuteness to the characteristics of culturally, linguistically, and ethnically distinct students while keeping in mind the uniqueness of their persona within a contextually rich school and community milieu.
  4. Explore multicultural education strategies that well enhance one's future pedagogical repertoire.
  5. Provide learning opportunities to develop multicultural and cross-cultural perspectives for application into future learning environments.
  6. Develop an active sense of commitment to collaborative efforts in order to best meet our goals as committed learners and educators who will teach with and facilitate multicultural curriculum in a variety of pluralistic settings.
  7. Develop an array of perspective skills in order to accommodate the dynamics of culture change, pluralism, cultural sensitivity, and cultural democracy that occur within classrooms.
  8. Demonstrate growth in the dispositions identified in the “Teacher Candidate Disposition” document.

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ECED 5210. Leadership and Advocacy in Early Childhood

3 Credits (3)

The course explores a multidisciplinary approach to early childhood educational leadership, advocacy and change. The course focuses on leadership in its many forms: in teaching, administration, policy, research, and ethics. In addition, we will examine the theory and practice of change to gain an understanding of what contributes to advocating for policy and community change. Students will gain a deeper understanding of themselves as leaders, and ways to improve early education to promote social justice in programs and systems serving families and young children. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Examine and evaluate a multidisciplinary approach to early childhood educational leadership.
  2. Examine leadership in its many forms: in teaching, administration, policy, research, and ethics.
  3. Utilize theory and practice of advocacy leadership for policy and community change.
  4. Develop a statement of leadership philosophy.

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ECED 5220. Play in the Early Childhood Curriculum

3 Credits (3)

Advanced exploration of the development of curriculum based on children's play. A means of exploring and learning the patterns of human living, communications, and experiences congruous with developing interests and capacities. Restricted to majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Incorporate understanding of play stages, development, and theories of play in early childhood education into developmentally appropriate practice. (I.A)
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the different types of play (sociodramatic, constructive, rough tumble, games with rule) and their uses in classrooms to promote learning. (I.B)
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the significance of guiding young children’s play to enhance learning in early childhood classrooms. (I.C)
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of social influences on play and young children’s development of gender identity. Provide and use anti-bias materials and experiences in all areas of the curriculum. (I.D)
  5. Provide a variety of play activities that facilitate development of the whole child in all areas, physical/motor, social/emotional, language/cognitive and adaptive/living skills. (I.E)
  6. Apply knowledge of cultural and play diversity and the significance of socio-cultural political contexts for development and learning and recognize that children are best understood in the contexts of family, culture, and society. (I.F)
  7. Demonstrate knowledge of the many functions play serves in the cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of development in the formative years.
  8. Develop and demonstrate skills in selecting quality play activities for young children. (I.G)
  9. Demonstrate knowledge of the developmental sequences of play development, including the influence of culture and home factors. (I.H) 1
  10. Demonstrate knowledge of how young children acquire and use technology play to promote learning. (I.I) 1
  11. Demonstrate knowledge of how play is used to support standards and assessment in early childhood education. (I.J)

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ECED 5230. Curriculum in Early Childhood Education

3 Credits (3)

Development and implementation of curriculum and materials for teaching young children. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and implement appropriate ECED curriculum.

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ECED 5310. Issues in Early Childhood Education

3 Credits (3)

Examines current trends and problems through readings of theoretical, empirical, and applied literature. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Examine the foundations of literacy development in early childhood.
  2. Analyze sociocultural and critical perspectives in early literacy research, theory, and practice.
  3. Apply grounded perspectives on topical issues in literacy development in early childhood.
  4. Evaluate the literacies embedded in your own teaching/learning and the ones embedded in the communities in which they work.
  5. Create sound theoretical and methodological frameworks in an early literacy project. Identify and use various genres in children’s literature.

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ECED 5410. Seminar on Child Development, Assessment and Well-being of Young Children

3 Credits (3)

This course will reintroduce you to the world of young children in a variety of early childhood settings. It focuses on early childhood development, observation of young children and evaluation of classrooms, child well-being, and the many ways in young children learn. Sessions will bridge theory to practice as we explore your internship experiences and gain deeper understanding of your role as an early care and education professional. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Incorporate understanding of developmental stages, process, and theories of growth, development, and learning into developmentally appropriate practice.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the interaction between maturation and environmental factors that influence physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and cultural domains in the healthy development of each child.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the similarities between children who are developing typically and those with special needs.
  4. Provide a variety of activities that facilitate development of the whole child in the following areas: physical/motor, social/emotional, language/cognitive, and adaptive/living skills. (I.E)
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of the many functions that language serves in the cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of development in the formative years. (I.G)
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of the developmental sequence of language and literacy, including the influence of culture and home factors. (I.H)
  7. Recognize signs of emotional distress, child abuse, and neglect in young children and use procedures appropriate to the situation, such as initiating discussions with families, referring to appropriate professionals, and, in cases of suspected abuse or neglect, reporting to designated authorities. B.four
  8. Demonstrate ability to adhere to early childhood education professional codes of ethical conduct and issues of confidentiality. G.one
  9. Demonstrate awareness of federal, state, and local regulations, and public policies regarding programs and services for children birth through eight years of age. G.two 1
  10. Demonstrate critical reflection of one's own professional and educational practices from community, state, national, and global perspectives. G.four 1
  11. Demonstrate knowledge in technology resources to engage in ongoing professional development. G.seven 1
  12. Articulate an understanding of indoor and outdoor learning environments that provide opportunities for children to put into practice healthy behaviors (physically, socially, and emotionally). B.two 1
  13. Use appropriate health appraisal and management procedures and make referrals when necessary. B.three 1
  14. Establish an environment that provides opportunities and reinforcement for children’s practice of healthy behaviors that promote appropriate nutrition and physical and psychological well-being. B.five 1
  15. Implement health care and educational activities for children and families based on health and nutritional information that is responsive to diverse cultures. B.seven

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ECED 5420. Science/Math Curriculum

3 Credits (2+2P)

Methods and materials for developmentally appropriate practices in teaching science and math for young children. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Synthesis of knowledge and skills appropriate to teaching in PreK - third grade educational settings.

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ECED 5510. Advanced Teaching and Learning of Literacy

3 Credits (3)

This advanced graduate early literacy course reviews the reading process including the relationship between reading, writing, listening, and speaking; individual needs and abilities in reading instruction; and how to organize classrooms and select materials to support literacy development. Concepts of phonemic awareness, phonic instruction, vocabulary development,fluency and comprehension are integrated with the developmentally appropriate use of authentic assessment techniques, language/literacy immersion, and multicultural children's literature.

Learning Outcomes
  1. This course will focus on the following New Mexico early childhood teacher education competencies and New Mexico State University’s conceptual framework for teacher preparation.
  2. Articulate an understanding of developmental theories and processes and their implications for appropriate methods of teaching reading in the K-third grade classroom.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of various instructional approaches and strategies for promoting literacy within an integrated curriculum framework.
  4. Provide and use anti-bias literacy materials and experiences, including primary language materials.
  5. Plan appropriate whole group, small group, and individual activities that include appropriate accommodations for working with children with special needs.
  6. Understand and articulate the concept of emergent literacy and the processes toward becoming an authentic reader and writer.
  7. Understand the role of family in literacy development.
  8. Respect and promote the use of the child’s home language for learning.
  9. Demonstrate knowledge of, and use effectively, a wide range of literacy assessment strategies and instruments to determine a child’s strengths and areas of need. 1
  10. Engage in reflection on current theoretical perspectives on the reading process and the role of print literacy in schools and our society. Our focus will be on rigorous inquiry about literacy education in U.S. schools and methods of literacy instruction. We will be examining how invisible cultural, historical, political, and social contexts have influenced and continue to influence teachers and schools. In your observations of reading and literacy education in your field experience it is critical that you become aware of these subtle but pervasive influences. To achieve this, we will focus our inquiry this semester on the following questions: What is literacy in early childhood education? Is that different from literacy outside of school? How do young children use and pursue literacy? How do I promote literacy for all the children with whom I work?

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ECED 5520. Literacy Development in Early Childhood

3 Credits (3)

Advanced theory, research, and practice relating to early childhood reading. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. This course will focus on the following New Mexico early childhood teacher education competencies and New Mexico State University’s conceptual framework for teacher preparation.
  2. Articulate an understanding of developmental theories and processes and their implications for appropriate methods of teaching reading in the K-third grade classroom.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of various instructional approaches and strategies for promoting literacy within an integrated curriculum framework.
  4. Provide and use anti-bias literacy materials and experiences, including primary language materials.
  5. Plan appropriate whole group, small group, and individual activities that include appropriate accommodations for working with children with special needs.
  6. Understand and articulate the concept of emergent literacy and the processes toward becoming an authentic reader and writer.
  7. Understand the role of family in literacy development.
  8. Respect and promote the use of the child’s home language for learning.
  9. Demonstrate knowledge of, and use effectively, a wide range of literacy assessment strategies and instruments to determine a child’s strengths and areas of need. 1
  10. Engage in reflection on current theoretical perspectives on the reading process and the role of print literacy in schools and our society. Our focus will be on rigorous inquiry about literacy education in U.S. schools and methods of literacy instruction. We will be examining how invisible cultural, historical, political, and social contexts have influenced and continue to influence teachers and schools. In your observations of reading and literacy education in your field experience it is critical that you become aware of these subtle but pervasive influences. To achieve this, we will focus our inquiry this semester on the following questions: What is literacy in early childhood education? Is that different from literacy outside of school? How do young children use and pursue literacy? How do I promote literacy for all the children with whom I work?

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ECED 5810. Student Teaching/Seminar

3 Credits (3)

Provides student teaching experience in a variety of settings with young children ages birth 8. Restricted to: TEP-ECED majors. Students must be Admitted into student teaching to enroll. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Our mission is to serve the people of New Mexico through education, research, extension education, and public service with specific emphasis on innovative practices, overcoming barriers to learning, international activities, technology, and literacy for the diverse populations of New Mexico, surrounding states and border communities.

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ECED 6110. History and Philosophy of Early Childhood Education

3 Credits (3)

Critical analysis of the historical development and philosophical underpinnings of the field of early childhood education as it relates to current practice. Restricted to doctoral-level students of any major. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Examine the historical figures in early childhood education that have influenced current practices and discourses.
  2. Identify theoretical, scientific, and philosophical foundations in early childhood education that have defined childhood learning and development.
  3. Critically examine the history of institutions and federal policies of early childhood education within the context of multiculturalism

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ECED 6996. Selected Topics in Early Childhood Education

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Offered under various subtitles. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of an ECED topic.

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Education Courses

EDUC 1110. Freshman Orientation

1 Credit (1)

Introduction to the university and to the College of Education. Discussion of planning for individualized education program and field experience. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only. May be repeated up to 1 credit.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrates knowledge of and uses theories, approaches, methods, and techniques for teaching, reading, writing, and other academic skills in English and the native language.
  2. Demonstrates knowledge of and applies management techniques appropriate to classrooms containing students who have varying levels of proficiency and academic experience in both languages.
  3. Community/Family Involvement- The bilingual teacher: (a)Recognizes the importance of parental and community involvement for facilitating the learner’s successful integration to his/her school environment. (b) Demonstrates knowledge of the teaching and learning patterns of the students’ home environment and incorporates these into the instructional areas of program.
  4. Assessment- The bilingual teacher: (a) Assesses oral and written language proficiency in academic areas in both languages utilizing the results for instructional placement, prescription, and evaluation. (b) Evaluates the growth of the learner’s native and second language in the context of the curriculum. (c) Continuously assesses and adjusts her or his own language use in the classroom in order to maximize learner comprehension and verbal participation

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EDUC 1120. Introduction to Education

2 Credits (2)

Introduction to the historical, philosophical, sociological foundations of education, current trends, and issues in education; especially as it relates to a multicultural environment. Students will use those foundations to develop effective strategies related to problems, issues and responsibilities in the field of education. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only. May be repeated up to 2 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the teaching and learning of various American education settings including early childhood, elementary, middle school, high school, and special education.
  2. Describe how teachers use educational theory and the results of research of students’ learning.
  3. Explain the techniques for establishing a positive and supportive environment in the classroom
  4. Identify and describe instructional strategies supported by current research to promote thinking skills of all learners.
  5. Recognize the teachers’ role and responsibilities in an increasingly diverse, multicultural society.

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EDUC 1140. Math for Paraprofessionals

3 Credits (3)

Applied math skills for paraprofessionals working with children. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: CCDM 103 N.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will plan developmentally appropriate math activities for young children.
  2. Students will plan adaptations to math activities for children with diverse abilities.
  3. Students will demonstrate understanding of recent research in methods of teaching mathematics.
  4. Students will demonstrate understanding of early childhood theories as they relate to the teaching of mathematics.
  5. Students will demonstrate understanding of unique needs of children from diverse economic or cultural backgrounds.

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EDUC 1150. Math for Paraprofessionals II

3 Credits (3)

Applied math skills for paraprofessionals working under the direction of a teacher. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: EDUC 1140.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will plan developmentally appropriate math activities for young children.
  2. Students will plan adaptations to math activities for children with diverse abilities.
  3. Students will demonstrate understanding of recent research in methods of teaching mathematics.
  4. Students will demonstrate understanding of early childhood theories as they relate to the teaching of mathematics.
  5. Students will demonstrate understanding of unique needs of children from diverse economic or cultural backgrounds.

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EDUC 1185. Introduction to Secondary Education and Youth

3 Credits (3)

Introductory course for students considering a career in secondary education. Includes historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations, program organization, critical dispositions, and understanding the context of schools and youth. Practicum required. Restricted to: Secondary Ed majors. Traditional Grading with RR.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Articulate the attributes of an education professional entering the field.
  2. Differentiate and summarize the major educational philosophies and historical events that have influenced the progression of educational practice.
  3. Describe the role of law in education with emphasis on the rights and responsibilities of teachers and learners.
  4. Develop a preliminary personal philosophy of teaching and learning.
  5. Discuss the characteristics and roles of the teacher, the student, and the school in today’s education.
  6. Identify effective teaching methods, instructional strategies and learning styles.
  7. Evaluate the Lesson Planning Process using various lesson planning templates, formats, and rubrics.
  8. Explain classroom management techniques.
  9. Identify different types of diversity in the classroom environment. 1
  10. Describe how learning differences are manifested in schools. 1
  11. Describe how teachers use multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress 1
  12. Describe how teachers use multiple methods of assessment to modify instruction and inform decision making. 1
  13. Identify the role of Standards and High Stakes Testing in the life of an educational professional 1
  14. Complete 24 hours internship in a classroom, preferably a bilingual classroom. 1
  15. Document and reflect on your observations throughout your internship. 1
  16. Construct an individualized map to teacher licensure in the State of New Mexico.

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EDUC 1995. Field Experience I

1 Credit (1)

Introduction to public school teaching, school visits, classroom observations and discussion seminar. May be repeated up to 1 credit.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of personal attitudes and motivations for entering the field of education.
  2. Identify effective teaching strategies that enhance student learning outcomes.
  3. Identify classroom management techniques and learning styles.
  4. Develop observational skills and reflective thinking skills.
  5. Evaluate instructional methods that enhance upper level thinking skills in children.

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EDUC 1996. Special Topics in Education

1 Credit (1)

Supervised study in a specific area of interest. Each course shall be designated by a qualifying subtitle. May be repeated up to 9 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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EDUC 1998. Internship I

3 Credits (3)

Supervised experience in elementary education settings. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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EDUC 2710. Pre-Teacher Preparation

3 Credits (3)

Assists students in developing the necessary competencies needed for acceptance to the Teacher Education Program. Course content includes basic skill development, test taking skills, and completion of teacher preparation packet. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Investigate the process and requirements of the Teacher Education Program
  2. Read critically about teacher’s experiences and write brief reactions
  3. Discuss philosophies of education and draft a written personal philosophy of education
  4. Discuss the nature of education for students with diverse languages, cultures and abilities
  5. Draft personal position statements concerning education for students with disabilities and diverse cultures

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EDUC 2998. Internship II

3 Credits (3)

Supervised experience in junior high settings. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: must be a co-op student.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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EDUC 3110V. Multicultural Issues in Society

3 Credits (3)

Conceptual manifestations of culture, race, ethnicity, class, gender, exceptionalities, language, and bilingualism within and across society. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand what is meant by “multicultural education” and respond to the issues and challenges involved as learners, educators, and education stakeholders;
  2. Reflect on definitions of power and privilege, critique understandings of difference, and examine the multi-faceted ways in which multicultural education can be enacted in pedagogy, curriculum, and educational organizations;
  3. Examine the intersections between race, class, gender, sexuality, language, and citizenship status and try to assess their impact on teaching and learning;
  4. Evaluate their own identities, biases, and position in the curricula and schooling experience.

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EDUC 3120. Multicultural Education

3 Credits (2+2P)

The conceptual manifestations of culture, race and ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, exceptionalities, language, bilingualism, and global citzenship within the schooling process. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand what is meant by “multicultural education” and respond to the issues and challenges involved as learners, educators, and education stakeholders;
  2. Reflect on definitions of power and privilege, critique understandings of difference, and examine the multi-faceted ways in which multicultural education can be enacted in pedagogy, curriculum, and educational organizations;
  3. Examine the intersections between race, class, gender, sexuality, language, and citizenship status and try to assess their impact on teaching and learning;
  4. Evaluate their own identities, biases, and position in the curricula and schooling experience.

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EDUC 3210. Sheltered English Instruction for the ESL Classroom

3 Credits (3)

Addresses the acquisition of English proficiency by speakers of other languages. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

EDUC 3220. Language, Literacy, and Culture in the ESL Classrooms

3 Credits (3)

Framework and strategies for developing the written abilities of second language learners. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

EDUC 3996. Special Topics in Education

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Offered under various subtitles in the Schedule of Classes. May be taken for a maximum of 3 cr. per semester and a total of 6 credits overall. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of a specific education topic.

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EDUC 3997. Secondary Field Experience

3 Credits (2+2P)

Develop professional skills, dispositions, and understanding of secondary bilingual youth, content, and pedagogy through discussion seminar and interactions with public education mentor teachers. Focused observations, study of classroom language and culture, introduction to lesson planning and student assessment. Requires 32 hours of practicum field experience. Taught with: BLED 3110. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and implement effective practices in secondary education.

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EDUC 4310. Methods of Teaching Elementary School Science

3 Credits (2+2P)

Methods and materials for teaching elementary school science. Includes components of lessons and the use of multimedia.Students must complete 9 hours of science from biology, chemistry, physics, and earth sciences, with no more than 3 hours from any one department. Restricted to: TEP-EED majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Create, teach, and assess research based, hands-on, elementary science lessons;
  2. Create, teach, and assess research based, hands-on, elementary science lessons that meet the diverse needs of all learners in all aspects of science instruction;
  3. Develop assessment tools to evaluate learner’s science knowledge;
  4. Identify and use appropriate NMSTEM Ready!State science standards for lesson planning;
  5. Integrate science with all subjects;
  6. Discuss the advantages and the importance of membership in national/international professional organizations(e.g. NSTA) as well as subscribing to professional journals;
  7. Identify science educational resources available using a variety of technological tools to enhance learning;
  8. Demonstrate competence and confidence in teaching science;
  9. Demonstrate basic classroom management skills.

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EDUC 4320. Methods of Teaching Elementary School Mathematics

3 Credits (3)

Content, theories of cognition, and instructional approaches for the teaching of mathematics in the elementary grades.

Prerequisite: MATH 1134.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify what makes a ‘good mathematical task’, and how a good task can support students’ learning;
  2. Understand how children make sense of key mathematics concepts;
  3. Understand how tools (including manipulatives, calculators, and other technology) assist children in their thinking and problem solving;
  4. Identify your role as a teacher in a math classroom;
  5. Practice teaching elementary mathematics activities using a constructivist approach and reflect upon your teaching;
  6. Adjust lessons and instruction based on students’ needs;
  7. Develop a stance of inquiry, explore habits of mind, examine and your own mathematical knowledge and develop the mathematical knowledge needed for effective teaching;
  8. Experience mathematics through thinking, reasoning, discourse/communicating, and developing math ideas with understanding so that as teachers you can facilitate learning as you work with students in this process;
  9. Begin to develop your knowledge and skills to effectively support ALL learners; in particular students with special needs and bilingual/ English Language Learners in mathematics

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 4330. Methods of Teaching Elementary School Social Studies

3 Credits (2+2P)

Focus on social studies curriculum and instruction including student-centered approaches, active learning, educational technology, nontextual curriculum, integration, multicultural education, authentic assessment, and practical applications. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understanding of equity and social justice through Social Studies education;
  2. Navigating the public-schools and how to integrate Social Studies lessons;
  3. Lesson planning and delivering Social Studies instruction;
  4. How to evaluate information found online for quality and truth; and
  5. Critiquing instructional materials and resources.

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 4410. Teaching Science at the Middle and High School Level

3 Credits (2+2P)

Integrating content knowledge and pedagogy for the middle and high school teacher in science. The focus will be on a variety of instructional strategies and pedagogical skills that will enhance the learning of science for students in grades 6-12. Practicum required. Taught with EDUC 5410. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and implement effective practices for teaching and learning in the secondary science classroom.

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 4420. Teaching Mathematics at the Middle and High School Level

3 Credits (2+2P)

Integrating content knowledge and pedagogy for the middle and high school teacher in mathematics. The focus will be on a variety of instructional strategies and pedagogical skills that will enhance the learning of mathematics. Practicum required. Taught with EDUC 5420. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and implement effective practices for teaching and learning in the secondary mathematics classroom.

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 4430. Teaching Social Studies at the Middle and High School Level

3 Credits (2+2P)

Integrating content knowledge and pedagogy for the middle and high school teacher in social studies. The focus will be on a variety of instructional strategies and pedagogical skills that will enhance the learning of social studies. Practicum required. Taught with EDUC 5430. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and implement effective practices for teaching and learning in the secondary social studies classroom.

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 4440. Teaching Language Arts at the Middle and High School Level

3 Credits (2+2P)

Implications of cognition and language development for appropriate secondary instructional practices. Focus on construction of meaning, student-centered response to literature, writing process, print and oral language development, based on socio-psycholinguistic research and theory. Practicum required. Taught with EDUC 5440. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will evaluate ELA and SS resources and synthesize important domains of education, including history, seminal texts, current events/trends, and formative learning theories such as global learning.
  2. Students will summarize classroom literacy, language, and culture of ELA/SS classrooms.
  3. Students will identify authentic assessment and effective instructional strategies and materials that can be used to deliver engaging lessons in ELA/SS reading, writing, and literature study.
  4. Students will justify their personal teaching philosophy in relation to the study of the history of ELA/SS education, literacy learning theories, teaching pedagogy, and field experiences.
  5. Students will assemble a professional, culminating reflective portfolio that demonstrates the ability to self-assess strengths and needs based on the NM-Teach standards.

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EDUC 4510. Data Literacy and Assessment

3 Credits (3)

Methods for selecting, constructing, and using multiple methods of assessment to monitor learner progress and improve student learning. Students will learn to analyze and use classroom and standardized assessment data to understand patterns and gaps in learning, to guide planning and instruction, and employ technology to support practice. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and implement effective data literacy and assessment procedures.

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EDUC 4520. Contemporary Issues in Education

3 Credits (2+2P)

Discussion of contemporary issues including: classroom management, motivation, conferences, professional organizations, professional ethics, community influences, cultural pluralism, reform movements, instructional influences, and educational technology. Requires field experience component in a school or community setting. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand important issues and practices in contemporary education.

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EDUC 4530. Science for Educators

3 Credits (3)

This course will focus on the exploration of key central science concepts and how to connect learners to resources, tools of inquiry, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues in classroom, lab, and digital science environments. Topics include: The nature of science, Physical Science, Life Science, Earth and Space Science.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand primary science content and knowledge for K-12 classrooms.

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EDUC 4810. Elementary Student Teaching

9 Credits (9)

Synthesis of knowledge and skills appropriate to teaching in elementary schools. May be repeated up to 9 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Synthesis of knowledge and skills appropriate to teaching in PreK - 3rd grade educational settings.

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EDUC 4811. Elementary Student Teaching Seminar

3 Credits (3)

Discussion of elementary school issues related to student teaching. Taken concurrently with EDUC 4810. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the critical concepts and principles in their discipline and of the pedagogical content knowledge necessary to engage students’ learning of concepts and principles in the discipline;
  2. Candidates create and implement learning experiences that motivate K-8 students, establish a positive learning environment, and support K-8 students’ understanding of the central concepts and principles in the content discipline;
  3. Candidates design, adapt, and select a variety of valid and reliable assessments and employ analytical skills necessary to inform ongoing planning and instruction, as well as to understand, and help students understand their own, progress and growth;
  4. Candidates engage students in reasoning and collaborative problem solving related authentic local, state, national, and global issues, incorporating new technologies and instructional tools appropriate to such tasks. Candidates use research and evidence to continually evaluate and improve their practice, particularly the effects of their choices and actions on others, and they adapt their teaching to meet the needs of each learner;
  5. Candidates design and implement appropriate and challenging learning experiences, based on an understanding of how children learn and develop. They ensure inclusive learning environments that encourage and help all K-8 students reach their full potential across a range of learner goals;
  6. Candidates work with K-8 students and families to create classroom cultures that support individual and collaborative learning and encourage positive social interaction, engagement in learning, and independence;
  7. Candidates build strong relationships with students, families, colleagues, other professionals, and community members, so that all are communicating effectively and collaborating for student growth, development, and well-being;
  8. Candidates reflect on their personal biases and access resources that deepen their own understanding of cultural, ethnic, gender, sexual orientation, language, and learning differences to build stronger relationships and to adapt practice to meet the needs of each learner.

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 4820. Secondary Student Teaching

9 Credits (9)

Synthesis of knowledge and skills appropriate to teaching in secondary schools. May be repeated up to 9 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Carry out effective student teaching in a secondary classroom.

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EDUC 4821. Middle and High School Student Teaching Seminar

3 Credits (3)

Discussion of secondary school issues related to student teaching. Taken concurrently with EDUC 4820. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Carry out effective student teaching in a secondary classroom.

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EDUC 4992. Directed Study Courses in Education

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Each course shall be identified by a qualifying subtitle. Maximum of 3 credits in any one semester and a grand total of 6 credits. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of a specific education topic.

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 4996. Topics

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Offered under various subtitles which indicate the subject matter to be covered. A maximum of 3 credits in any one semester and a grand total of 3 credits. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of a specific education topic.

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EDUC 5110. Exploration in Education

3 Credits (3+3P)

Overview of elementary and secondary schooling. Includes opportunities to gain teaching experience in diverse settings.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Explore important concepts and knowledge necessary to carry out effective practices in K-12 classroom settings.

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EDUC 5120. Multicultural Education

3 Credits (2+2P)

Conceptual manifestations of culture, race, and ethnicity, class, gender, exceptionalities, language and bilingualism within the schooling process. Taught with EDUC 3120 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze the influence on learning of such social identities as race, class, sexual orientation, language, and gender.
  2. Deconstruct tacit knowledges about learners and the learning process.
  3. Distinguish among the structural and discursive forces that hamper particular students’ educational attainment.
  4. Evaluate one’s own personal response to oppression in educational settings.
  5. Support a pedagogical perspective and school level strategies targeted towards a more just and equitable education in your classroom.

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EDUC 5130. Technology and Pedagogy

3 Credits (3)

Critical analysis, design, and evaluation of computer-based technologies in teaching and learning for diverse communities. Students must be in Graduate standing. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the relationship between curriculum and pedagogy.

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EDUC 5140. Research in Curriculum and Pedagogy

3 Credits (3)

An introduction to qualitative and quantitative designs for research in curriculum and instruction, with emphasis on action research. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Locate metrics useful for evaluating the quality of published research;
  2. Identify the claims and supportive evidence presented in published empirical research;
  3. Weigh the evidence presented in published empirical research;
  4. Analyze the alignment of methods used in published empirical research with associated frameworks and research questions;
  5. Synthesize a narrow body of literature in their field of interest.

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EDUC 5150. Classroom Management

3 Credits (3)

Strategies for managing classroom settings and determining appropriate modification of instructional approaches to meet changing classroom situations. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand effective practices in K-12 classroom management.

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EDUC 5160. Curriculum and Pedagogy

3 Credits (3)

Introduction, reconstruction, and other connections among historical, philosophical, sociocultural, psychological, and theoretical foundations of curriculum and pedagogy and their application to culturally and linguistically diverse teaching and learning settings. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the historical development of standards, curriculum, and assessment in the USA;
  2. Critically analyze the major influences on the historical development of standards, curriculum, and assessment:
  3. Explain the positive and negative impacts these major influences have had on current standards, curriculum, and assessment;
  4. Students will be able to express attainable planned actions to advocate for socially just and equitable systems within their school, district, community, and profession;
  5. Construct a coherent pedagogical perspective that draws on the theories and perspectives discussed throughout the course;
  6. Create a plan for a lesson that puts into action the curricular and pedagogical perspectives that place value in, and make space for, the diversity of individual social development within and between cultures.

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EDUC 5170. Action Research Projects

3 Credits (3)

Deeper explorations and connections among foundations of curriculum and pedagogy and their application to culturally and linguistically diverse teaching and learning settings through action research projects, approaches to assessment, and agency. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: EDUC 5120, EDUC 5140.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understanding of Action Research
  2. Develop an Action Research plan: Question Development; Data collection plan; Analysis
  3. Analysis to Action for teaching: Applying data results to planning; Decision-making for changes in teaching
  4. Presentation of Research: Research writing process

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EDUC 5210. Sheltered English Instruction for the ESL Classroom

3 Credits (3)

Addresses the acquisition of English proficiency vie the SIOP (Sheltered Instruction Observational Protocol)a research validated model for lesson planning and implementation that provides English learners with access to grade-level standards.

EDUC 5220. Language, Literacy and Culture in the ESL Classrooms

3 Credits (3)

Framework and strategies for developing the written abilities of second language learners. Explore different theories of language, culture and literacy by analyzing the interconnections between language, culture and literacy.

EDUC 5310. Methods of Teaching Elementary School Science

3 Credits (2+2P)

Methods and materials for teaching elementary school science. Includes components of lessons, planning and teaching lessons in schools, and multimedia. Students should have 9 hours of science from biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science with no more than 3 hours from any one department to enroll in this course. Taught with EDUC 4310 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Corequisite: ECED 5810; EDUC 5320; READ 5310.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Create, teach, and assess research based, hands-on, elementary science lessons;
  2. Create, teach, and assess research based, hands-on, elementary science lessons that meet the diverse needs of all learners in all aspects of science instruction;
  3. Develop assessment tools to evaluate learner’s science knowledge;
  4. Identify and use appropriate NMSTEM Ready!State science standards for lesson planning;
  5. Integrate science with all subjects;
  6. Discuss the advantages and the importance of membership in national/international professional organizations(e.g. NSTA) as well as subscribing to professional journals;
  7. Identify science educational resources available using a variety of technological tools to enhance learning;
  8. Demonstrate competence and confidence in teaching science;
  9. Demonstrate basic classroom management skills.

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EDUC 5320. Methods of Teaching Elementary School Mathematics

3 Credits (2+2P)

Content, theories of cognition, and instructional approaches for the teaching of mathematics in the elementary grades. Taught with EDUC 4320 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: MATH 1134.

Corequisite: ECED 5810; EDUC 5310; READ 5310.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify what makes a ‘good mathematical task’, and how a good task can support students’ learning;
  2. Understand how children make sense of key mathematics concepts;
  3. Understand how tools (including manipulatives, calculators, and other technology) assist children in their thinking and problem solving;
  4. Identify your role as a teacher in a math classroom;
  5. Practice teaching elementary mathematics activities using a constructivist approach and reflect upon your teaching;
  6. Adjust lessons and instruction based on students’ needs;
  7. Develop a stance of inquiry, explore habits of mind, examine and your own mathematical knowledge and develop the mathematical knowledge needed for effective teaching;
  8. Experience mathematics through thinking, reasoning, discourse/communicating, and developing math ideas with understanding so that as teachers you can facilitate learning as you work with students in this process;
  9. Begin to develop your knowledge and skills to effectively support ALL learners; in particular students with special needs and bilingual/ English Language Learners in mathematics

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 5330. Methods of Teaching Elementary School Social Studies

3 Credits (2+2P)

Focus on social studies curriculum and instruction including student-centered approaches, active learning, educational technology, nontextual curriculum, integration, multicultural education, authentic assessment, and practical applications. Taught with EDUC 4330 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Corequisite: READ 5320.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understanding of equity and social justice through Social Studies education;
  2. Navigating the public-schools and how to integrate Social Studies lessons;
  3. Lesson planning and delivering Social Studies instruction;
  4. How to evaluate information found online for quality and truth; and
  5. Critiquing instructional materials and resources.

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 5410. Teaching Science at the Middle and High School Level

3 Credits (2+2P)

Integrating content knowledge and pedagogy for the middle and high school teacher in science. The focus will be on a variety of instructional strategies and pedagogical skills that will enhance the learning of science for student in grades 6-12. Practicum required. Same as EDUC 463 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. TEP required May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: EDUC 5120 & EDUC 5110.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and implement effective practices for teaching and learning in the secondary science classroom.

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 5420. Teaching Mathematics at the Middle and High School Level

3 Credits (2+2P)

Integrating content knowledge and pedagogy for the middle and high school teacher in mathematics. The focus will be on a variety of instructional strategies and pedagogical skills that will enhance the learning of students in 6-12 setting settings for mathematics. Same as EDUC 4420 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. TEP required May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: EDUC 5120 & EDUC 5110.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and implement effective practices for teaching and learning in the secondary mathematics classroom.

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 5430. Teaching Social Studies at the Middle and High School Level

3 Credits (2+2P)

Integrating content knowledge and pedagogy for the middle and high school teacher in social studies. The focus will be on a variety of instructional strategies and pedagogical skills that will enhance the learning of social studies for student in grades 6-12. Practicum required. Same as EDUC 4430 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. TEP required May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: EDUC 5120 & EDUC 5110.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and implement effective practices for teaching and learning in the secondary social studies classroom.

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 5440. Teaching Language Arts at the Middle and High School Level

3 Credits (2+2P)

Implications of cognition and language development for appropriate secondary instructional practices. Focus on construction of meaning, student-centered response to literature, writing process, print and oral language development, based on socio-psycholinguistic research and theory. Practicum required. Same as EDUC 4440 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. TEP required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: EDUC 5120 & EDUC 5110.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will evaluate ELA and SS resources and synthesize important domains of education, including history, seminal texts, current events/trends, and formative learning theories such as global learning.
  2. Students will summarize classroom literacy, language, and culture of ELA/SS classrooms.
  3. Students will identify authentic assessment and effective instructional strategies and materials that can be used to deliver engaging lessons in ELA/SS reading, writing, and literature study.
  4. Students will justify their personal teaching philosophy in relation to the study of the history of ELA/SS education, literacy learning theories, teaching pedagogy, and field experiences.
  5. Students will assemble a professional, culminating reflective portfolio that demonstrates the ability to self-assess strengths and needs based on the NM-Teach standards.

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 5510. Elementary Science Development

3 Credits (3)

Understanding of the research on elementary development of science and its application in the classroom. Focus on how elementary students come to understand topics in the physical sciences, life sciences, and earth and space sciences. Includes applications to engineering and technology. Course assignments require working with elementary students. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to: Master of Arts in Education: Elementary Mathematics and Science majors.

Learning Outcomes
  1. To put current research on elementary students’ development of science into practice.
  2. To analyze student thinking to construct models of cognitive structures.
  3. To select, sequence, and administer tasks to test models of students’ cognitive structures.
  4. To develop and facilitate a classroom lesson plan to build on models of students’ cognitive structures.
  5. To reflect on observations of student learning in relation to current research on elementary students’ development of science.

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EDUC 5520. Elementary Mathematics Development I

3 Credits (3)

Understanding of the research on elementary development of mathematics and its application in the classroom. Focus on how elementary students come to understand counting, the base 10 number system, and connections between early number understanding, geometric representations, fractions, and operations in later grades. Course assignments require working with elementary students. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to: Master of Arts in Education: Elementary Mathematics and Science majors.

Learning Outcomes
  1. To put current research on elementary students’ development of mathematics into practice.
  2. To analyze student thinking to construct models of cognitive structures.
  3. To select, sequence, and administer tasks to test models of students’ cognitive structures.
  4. To develop and facilitate a classroom lesson plan to build on models of students’ cognitive structures.
  5. To reflect on observations of student learning in relation to current research on elementary students’ development of mathematics.

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EDUC 5530. Elementary Mathematics Development 2

3 Credits (3)

Understanding of the research on elementary development of mathematics and its application in the classroom. Focus on how elementary students develop multiplicative reasoning from a foundation of additive reasoning, connections to geometric representations, and how multiplicative reasoning supports development of understanding of fractions, ratios, and rate—which leads to proportional reasoning. Course assignments require working with elementary students. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to: Master of Arts in Education: Elementary Mathematics and Science majors.

Learning Outcomes
  1. To put current research on elementary students’ development of science into practice.
  2. To analyze student thinking to construct models of cognitive structures.
  3. To select, sequence, and administer tasks to test models of students’ cognitive structures.
  4. To develop and facilitate a classroom lesson plan to build on models of students’ cognitive structures.
  5. To reflect on observations of student learning in relation to current research on elementary students’ development of science.

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 5540. Leadership Advocacy in Elementary Mathematics and Science

3 Credits (3)

This course focuses on development of elementary mathematics and science specialists’ leadership qualities necessary to promote and advocate for positive change through active participation with other professionals and in their own professional growth that draws upon current research in their respective fields, development of professional development programs, evaluation of educational structures that impact equitable access to high quality instruction, and communication with stakeholders directly and indirectly associated with education institutions. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to: Master of Arts in Education: Elementary Mathematics and Science majors.

Learning Outcomes
  1. To leverage current research on elementary students’ development of mathematics science to enact change in teaching practice and education policy.
  2. To make use of leadership skills to facilitate discussion with education stakeholders, school and district administrators, and teaching professionals.
  3. To make use of leadership skills to collaborate with education stakeholders, school and district administrators, and teaching professionals.
  4. To examine current mathematics and science teaching practice within a school or district and create a professional development plan that aligns with current research on best practices.
  5. To examine current mathematics and science teaching practice within a school or district and create a professional development plan that aligns with district and/or school mission and vision.

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EDUC 5810. Student Teaching

6 Credits (6)

Integrated with EDUC 5811. Student is assigned to an elementary or secondary classroom for 14-16 weeks. Elementary or secondary.

Corequisite: EDUC 5811.

Learning Outcomes
  1. The teacher candidate seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.
  2. The teacher candidate uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
  3. The teacher candidate works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
  4. The teacher candidate understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content.
  5. The teacher candidate understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
  6. The teacher candidate understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues
  7. The teacher candidate understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision making.
  8. The teacher candidate plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context.
  9. The teacher candidate understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways. 1
  10. The teacher candidate engages in ongoing professional learning and uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.

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EDUC 5811. Teaching Methods Laboratory

3 Credits (3)

Practical application of previously learned content. Students must have a Bachelors degree and admission to the Graduate School and departmental special program. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the critical concepts and principles in their discipline and of the pedagogical content knowledge necessary to engage students’ learning of concepts and principles in the discipline;
  2. Candidates create and implement learning experiences that motivate K-8 students, establish a positive learning environment, and support K-8 students’ understanding of the central concepts and principles in the content discipline;
  3. Candidates design, adapt, and select a variety of valid and reliable assessments and employ analytical skills necessary to inform ongoing planning and instruction, as well as to understand, and help students understand their own, progress and growth;
  4. Candidates engage students in reasoning and collaborative problem solving related authentic local, state, national, and global issues, incorporating new technologies and instructional tools appropriate to such tasks. Candidates use research and evidence to continually evaluate and improve their practice, particularly the effects of their choices and actions on others, and they adapt their teaching to meet the needs of each learner;
  5. Candidates design and implement appropriate and challenging learning experiences, based on an understanding of how children learn and develop. They ensure inclusive learning environments that encourage and help all K-8 students reach their full potential across a range of learner goals;
  6. Candidates work with K-8 students and families to create classroom cultures that support individual and collaborative learning and encourage positive social interaction, engagement in learning, and independence;
  7. Candidates build strong relationships with students, families, colleagues, other professionals, and community members, so that all are communicating effectively and collaborating for student growth, development, and well-being;
  8. Candidates reflect on their personal biases and access resources that deepen their own understanding of cultural, ethnic, gender, sexual orientation, language, and learning differences to build stronger relationships and to adapt practice to meet the needs of each learner.

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 5990. Master's Thesis

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Thesis. A minimum of four credits and a maximum of six credits (thesis hours) can be counted toward the MA degree. The thesis hours require the permission of the course instructor. May be repeated up to 15 credits. May be repeated up to 15 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Graduate students at the Master of Arts level pursuing a research focus degree learn how to prepare for basic research study.
  2. Graduate students at the Master of Arts level pursuing a research focus degree learn how to submit IRB for a research study.
  3. Graduate students at the Master of Arts level pursuing a research focus degree learn how to conduct a comprehensive study.
  4. Graduate students at the Master of Arts level pursuing a research focus degree learn how to summarize the research and write the results in a thesis.
  5. Graduate students at the Master of Arts level pursuing a research focus degree learn how to present results from research and defend the results.

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EDUC 5991. Special Research Programs

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Individual investigations either analytical or experimental. Maximum of 3 credits per semester and a total of 6 credits overall. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in a specific research topic.

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EDUC 5992. Directed Study Courses in Education

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Each course will be identified by a qualifying subtitle. Maximum of 3 credits in any one semester and a total of 6 credits overall. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in a specific education topic.

View Learning Outcomes

EDUC 5996. Special Topics

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Course subtitled in the Schedule of Classes. A maximum of 3 credits per semester and a total of 6 credits overall. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of a specific education topic.

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EDUC 5997. Capstone Research Project

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Capstone project. Maximum of 3 credits per semester and a total of 6 credits overall. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to: Admittance into the Master of Arts in Education: Elementary Mathematics and Science program.

Learning Outcomes
  1. To investigate a problem or issue in education.
  2. To communicate results of the investigation in a scholarly manner.

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EDUC 5998. Social Studies/Language Arts Methods Internship

3 Credits (3)

Elementary alternative licensure process course designed to introduce intern licensed teachers to methods of instruction of social studies and language arts. University supervision provided simultaneously with EDUC 5998. Restricted to CI and HSS non-degree students. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Carry out a successful intership in social studies and language arts teaching methods.

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EDUC 6110. Curriculum for a Diverse Society

3 Credits (3)

Builds upon knowledge of the foundations of curriculum and professional experience in an educational setting. Focus on the role of the curriculum leader in understanding curriculum theory, designing curriculum, and implementing curriculum in various settings. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Reflect on the significance of the teachers’ professional role in schools;
  2. Analyze the notion of curriculum in a broader sense along with the concepts of culture and diversity;
  3. Develop understanding of the fundamental theoretical constructs in organizing the way we interact and live in our society;
  4. Assume the commitment to challenge the taken for granted assumptions that have led schools to be places where inequities have been perpetuated;
  5. Take on the challenge of transforming schools into public social spheres where hope is promoted, looked for, and risks are taken and faced.

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EDUC 6120. Pedagogy of Learning in a Diverse Society

3 Credits (3)

Builds upon knowledge of the foundations of instruction and professional experience in teaching and learning. Focus on diverse theories of instruction with relevant practices in pluralistic settings and multicultural interactions of teaching and learning. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Instill a personal discipline that will establish clarity into your plan of studies to operationalize the direction of your research project;
  2. Develop a deeper and thicker knowledge base, language facility, and chronological understanding that impact contemporary theoretical/philosophical paradigms;
  3. Create a critical reflection on many of the contemporary issues/findings of recent brain research, its implications for pedagogy and andragogy and central to teaching and learning;
  4. Articulate several of the diverse historical forces that legitimate certain teaching and learning practices, theories/issues in contemporary schooling life, and delegitimize other theories/issues just as easily;
  5. Create a sense of collegiality and community with your seminar colleagues inside and outside of this course

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EDUC 6210. Curricular Mediation for Democratic Communities

3 Credits (3)

Problematization of the various relationships, roles, and leadership considerations which emerge within educational institutions, their structures, and their culturally democratic practices in the classroom, community, and society. Restricted to doctoral-level students of any major. Same as BLED 6210. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

EDUC 6220. Praxis and Reflexivity

3 Credits (3)

The cyclical research processes of continuous self and systemic (re)evaluation vis-a-vis classroom, community, and society with an eye toward reflection, growth, change, and larger forms of social agency. Restricted to doctoral-level students of any major. Same as BLED 6220, READ 6220. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

EDUC 6230. Research as Praxis

3 Credits (3)

Alternative community-or-school-based research aimed at investigating and transforming educational realities, with the participants for their own benefit. Students will experience the dynamic between research theory and practice in education. Restricted to: EDUC,C I,C ID majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: EDUC 6420.

EDUC 6310. Critical Theory and Pedagogy

3 Credits (3)

Covers the various schools of thought on pedagogy, the historical and philosophical foundations embedded in these schools, and their impact on educational settings. Restricted to doctoral-level students of any major. Same as BLED 6310. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

EDUC 6320. Social Justice Issues in Education

3 Credits (3)

Covers the systems of oppression located within the constructs of power and hegemony and their impact on schooling. Restricted to doctoral-level students of any major. Same as BLED 6320. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

EDUC 6330. Critical Race Theory & Storytelling in Educational Spaces

3 Credits (3)

An upper-level doctoral course focusing on the philosophical, theoretical, and methodological origins and practices of CRT and the sister frameworks that emerged from CRT, i.e., AsianCrit, BlackCrit, FemCrit, LatCrit, QueerCrit, TribalCrit, and WhiteCrit within educational spaces. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Articulate the major tenets and assumptions of critical race theory (CRT);
  2. Evaluate CRT's usefulness in educational research and what makes a CRT analysis unique or different from other analyses;
  3. Synthesize research conduced by CRT scholars and the effect of racial injustice on students of color;
  4. Analyze and disrupt majoritarian narratives (stories) that perpetuate racial injustice in the U.S., with a focus on institutions that intersect with educational systems.

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EDUC 6410. Current Research in Educational Practice

3 Credits (3)

A seminar for doctoral and education specialist students emphasizing current research and educational practices. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of a specific education research topic.

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EDUC 6420. Evaluation of Quantitative Research in Education

3 Credits (3)

A doctoral-level exploration of a broad range of quantitative research designs and methodologies for collection and analysis of data as applied to critical review of the literature. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify the tasks and processes required to formulate appropriate research problems within educational settings, design relevant qualitative research strategies; for examining such problems, select pertinent data sources, data collection methods, and data analysis methods, and assess the results of such efforts.

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EDUC 6430. Advanced Statistics

3 Credits (3)

An intermediate course focusing on more advanced theories and techniques of inferential statistics as applied to education and psychology. Includes ANOVA, planned contrasts, ANCOVA, simple regression, and non-parametrics. A computer package will be the primary tool for data analysis.

Prerequisite: EDUC 6420 or equivalent course work.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrates knowledge of and uses theories, approaches, methods, and techniques for research in education.
  2. Demonstrates knowledge of and applies research techniques appropriate to a research problem.

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EDUC 6440. Qualitative Research I

3 Credits (3)

This course offers an examination of qualitative research approaches used in educational and social settings, with a focus upon research design, field relations, data collection and analysis, and writing from a qualitative perspective. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify the tasks and processes required to formulate appropriate research problems within educational settings, design relevant qualitative research strategies; for examining such problems, select pertinent data sources, data collection methods, and data analysis methods, and assess the results of such efforts.

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EDUC 6910. Dissertation Seminar

3 Credits (3)

Dissertation seminar course for doctoral students utilizing a qualitative research design. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. To investigate a problem or issue in education.
  2. Prepare the first three chapters of a dissertation.

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EDUC 6990. Practicum

2-6 Credits (2-6)

Provision for field inquiries and experiences designed to prepare the doctoral student for assuming responsibilities in the areas of curriculum and instruction. Students must be in post-master's standing. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Plan course of study with with faculty advisor or instructor.
  2. Set practicum expectations for semester.

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EDUC 6991. Doctoral Research

1-15 Credits (1-15)

Research. May be repeated up to 88 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in a specific research topic.

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EDUC 6996. Selected Topics

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Offered under various subtitles which indicate the subject matter to be covered. A maximum of 6 credits per semester and a total of 6 credits overall. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of an ECED topic.

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EDUC 6997. Independent Study Topics

1-3 Credits (1-3)

A problem and seminar course for those pursuing an advanced graduate degree. Course subtitled in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated up to 99 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Plan course of study with with faculty advisor or instructor
  2. Set course expectations.

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EDUC 6998. Internship in Curriculum and Instruction

3-6 Credits (3-6)

For those pursuing an advanced graduate degree to meet the requirement for field work. Each course to bear an appropriate subtitle. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Complete an educational internship.

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EDUC 6999. Ed.S. Thesis

1-15 Credits (1-15)

Offered primarily for those pursuing the research requirements for the Ed.S. degree. Course may be repeated up to a maximum allowed for this degree. Each research project will be designated by a qualifying subtitle. May be repeated up to 88 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. To investigate a problem or issue in education.
  2. Prepare the a complete doctoral project.

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EDUC 7000. Doctoral Dissertation

1-15 Credits (1-15)

Dissertation. May be repeated up to 88 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Complete all phases of dissertation.
  2. Defend dissertation

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Educational Learning Technology Courses

EDLT 2110. Integrating Technology with Teaching

3 Credits (3)

Considers impact of technology on communication and knowledge development; engages students in the design of technology-integrated lessons with a constructivist approach.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1110G.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will demonstrate a sound understanding of technology operations and concepts.
  2. Students will plan and design effective learning environments and experiences supported by technology.
  3. Students will implement curriculum plans that include methods and strategies for applying technology to maximize learning.
  4. Students will apply technology to facilitate a variety of effective assessment and evaluation strategies.
  5. Students will use technology to enhance their productivity and professional practice.
  6. Students will better understand the social, ethical, legal, and human issues surrounding the use of technology on PreK-12 schools and apply that knowledge into future practice.

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EDLT 3110. Integrating Technology with Teaching

3 Credits (3)

Considers impact of technology on communication and knowledge development; engages students in the design of technology-integrated lessons with a constructivist approach. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will demonstrate a sound understanding of technology operations and concepts.
  2. Students will plan and design effective learning environments and experiences supported by technology.
  3. Students will implement curriculum plans that include methods and strategies for applying technology to maximize learning.
  4. Students will apply technology to facilitate a variety of effective assessment and evaluation strategies.
  5. Students will use technology to enhance their productivity and professional practice.
  6. Students will better understand the social, ethical, legal, and human issues surrounding the use of technology on PreK-Tweleve schools and apply that knowledge into future practice.

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EDLT 5110. Foundations of Learning Design & Technology

3 Credits (3)

This course covers how to access, use, design, and evaluate instructional resources on the Internet, for blended and online learning environments. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Provide a rationale for using a systematic approach to learning design. Identify and summarize the major elements commonly included in instructional development models.
  2. Define terms used to describe the phases and strategies of the learning design process.Conduct a needs assessment.
  3. Demonstrate the following competency in the completion of an instructional development project: a) identify an instructional problem, b) analyze learners and learning contexts, c) plan and implement a goal analysis, d) specify terminal and enabling learning objectives, e) design criterion measures, f) prepare appropriate testing instruments and procedures, g) select appropriate instructional strategies, h) select appropriate instructional media (delivery systems), i) construct a prototype product, j) plan and conduct formative evaluations, and k) specify revisions resulting from formative evaluation.
  4. Compare and contrast various instructional design perspectives and philosophies. Develop effective and efficient instructional products.

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EDLT 5120. Critical Digital Literacy

3 Credits (3)

Explore, evaluate and use a variety of multimedia authoring tools including website, video, audio, image editing and apps (iOS/Android) for educational applications. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Considers impact of technology on communication and knowledge development; engages students in the design of technology-integrated lessons with a constructivist approach.

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EDLT 5130. Technology and Language Learning

3 Credits (3)

Use of technology to enhance second language and dual language programs. Organized around technology enhanced communicative and interactive language learning environments. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Considers use of technology to enhance second language and dual language programs. Organized around technology enhanced communicative and interactive language learning environments

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EDLT 5140. Fostering Online Learning Communities

3 Credits (3)

Examines theoretical and practical aspects of communication and collaboration and their impact on the formation of online learning communities for those teaching adults in higher education, business, or government settings. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Examine theoretical and practical aspects of communication and collaboration and their impact on the formation of online learning communities for those teaching adults in higher education, business, or government settings.

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EDLT 5210. Social Media in Blended and Online Learning Environments

3 Credits (3)

This course will explore the role of social media in online and blended learning environments through practical hands-on activities, critical dialogue, and collaborative projects which will prepare you to utilize social media personally and pedagogically. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe and give examples of social media for use in your blended and online learning environments.
  2. Actively engage, communicate and collaborate using social media, both inside the classroom and in appropriate social media-based learning environments.
  3. Evaluate, analyze, and synthesize readings, research, and other information about social media in education.
  4. Access, utilize, design, evaluate, and assess learning activities using social media.

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EDLT 5220. Culturally Responsive Teaching with Technology

3 Credits (3)

Use of inquiry and problem-based learning supported by computer-based applications. Critical analysis of multiple forms of electronic media. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in culturally responsive teaching with technology.

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EDLT 5230. Designing and Organizing Online Learning Environments

3 Credits (3)

Explores the theories, models, approaches, technologies, and methods of online teaching and adult learning. Provides a foundation for examining the roles and characteristics of the online teacher and learner for those teaching adults in higher education, business, or government settings. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Design and organize effective online learning.

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EDLT 5240. Online Teaching and Learning

3 Credits (3)

This course provides a survey of theories, models and methods used to design and deliver online education through the use of technologies in K-12, higher education, business/industry, and continuing education. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate an awareness of equity social justice issues related to online education.
  2. Critique and reflect upon diverse design frameworks,
  3. Develop online resources for use in your professional and personal educational pursuits,
  4. Explore and participate in the use of emerging technologies for online education.
  5. Identify and discuss the impact of different technological innovations on society with particular emphasis on education,
  6. Analyze and evaluate the use of technologies for teaching and learning in culturally relevant and responsive ways.

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EDLT 5250. Tools and Techniques for Online Teaching

3 Credits (3)

Examines the theoretical and practical implications of various asynchronous and synchronous tools and their impact on teaching and learning through research and hands-on experience. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Implement effective online teaching.

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EDLT 5310. Design and Delivery of Webconferences and Webinars

3 Credits (3)

This course provides hands-on experiences with web conferencing and examines the theory and research of webconferencing's impact on teaching and learning. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate the skillful use of the technology tools for a synchronous webconferencing system.
  2. Evaluate best practices of interaction and engagement in the design and delivery webconferencing events.
  3. Develop a variety of webconferencing strategies to engage and manage webconferencing attendees.
  4. Design, develop, and implement the delivery of a web conference, first with a partner or team and individually by the end of the course.
  5. Use self- and peer-evaluation for continuous improvement of web conferencing sessions.

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EDLT 5320. Universal Design in Online Course Design

3 Credits (3)

Examines theory, practical application of strategies, and global and policy implications of universal design (UD)in online learning environments. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and implement universal design.

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EDLT 5330. Emerging Technology Tools and Techniques

3 Credits (3)

This course examines the theory, research, and practice of emerging technologies for educational practice and their impact on online teaching and learning. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Implement effective techniques.

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EDLT 5992. Directed Study

3 Credits (3)

Supervised academic work. Consent of Instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of an EDLT topic.

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EDLT 5999. Capstone

3 Credits (3)

The capstone course provides an opportunity to demonstrate teaching and learning in blended and fully online environments. Demonstrate competencies with best practices in culturally responsive teaching, learning/educational technology, online pedagogy, portfolio creation, and curriculum development for blended and online delivery using emerging technologies. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Apply teaching and learning standards to review blended or online courses for learning environments.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency using the tools of learning management systems.
  3. Apply best practices in instructional design for blended/online courses
  4. Explain how research and practice inform your course instructional design decisions.
  5. Create a blended or online learning course that meets online teaching standards
  6. Demonstrate participation in an online learning community.

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EDLT 6110. Foundations of Learning Design & Technology

3 Credits (3)

This course covers how to access, use, design, and evaluate instructional resources on the Internet, for blended and online learning environments. Includes a theoretical and research component for doctoral students. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Provide a rationale for using a systematic approach to learning design. Identify and summarize the major elements commonly included in instructional development models.
  2. Define terms used to describe the phases and strategies of the learning design process. Conduct a needs assessment.
  3. Demonstrate the following competency in the completion of an instructional development project: a) identify an instructional problem, b) analyze learners and learning contexts, c) plan and implement a goal analysis, d) specify terminal and enabling learning objectives, e) design criterion measures, f) prepare appropriate testing instruments and procedures, g) select appropriate instructional strategies, h) select appropriate instructional media (delivery systems), i) construct a prototype product, j) plan and conduct formative evaluations, and k) specify revisions resulting from formative evaluation.
  4. Compare and contrast various instructional design perspectives and philosophies. Develop effective and efficient instructional products.

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EDLT 6120. Emerging Models for Learning Design & Technology

3 Credits (3)

Integration of technology into content areas. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand emerging EDLT models.

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EDLT 6210. Current Research in Learning and Technology

3 Credits (3)

Explores models and methods for examining and researching the impact of technology on learning and education. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand current technology research.

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EDLT 6220. Multimedia, Authoring and Curriculum Design

3 Credits (3)

Explore, evaluate and use a variety of multimedia authoring tools including website, video, audio, image editing and apps (iOS/Android) for educational applications. Includes additional theoretical research component for doctoral students. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Facilitate effective technology learning environments.

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EDLT 6230. Technology, Society, and Education

3 Credits (3)

Investigates models of the change process, examines speculations related to the directions and dynamics of change in an era of electronic technologies, explores shifts in the cultural and personal activities and relations of humans, and speculates on concomitant educational implications. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand technology and pedagogy.

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EDLT 6240. Online Teaching and Learning

3 Credits (3)

This course provides a survey of theories; models and methods used to design and deliver online education through the use of technologies in K-12, higher education, business/industry, and continuing education. Topics covered include accreditation, assessment, culturally responsive course design, current trends and best practices, hybrid and blended learning, learning management systems, online support services, social justice issues in online education, learner engagement, and retention.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Implement effective digital pedagogy.

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EDLT 6998. Advanced Fieldwork

3 Credits (3)

Fieldwork in learning technologies provides opportunities to integrate theory and practice through research, teaching and/or development. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Examine the historical figures in early childhood education that have influenced current practices and discourses. Identify theoretical, scientific, and philosophical foundations in early childhood education that have defined childhood learning and development. Critically examine the history of institutions and federal policies of early childhood education within the context of multiculturalism

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Educational Leadership Administration Courses

ELAD 2210. Leadership and Change in Education

3 Credits (3)

This course will introduce students to the challenges and key strategies in initiating, implementing, and sustaining educational change and reform. In the first part of the course, participants will learn about the challenges of educational change in the United States and the role that they as school leaders play in facilitating change and reform. The course continues with an examination of how culture, micro-politics, and power structures support or impede national and global change initiatives. The last part of the course offers suggestions for change agents including community organizing, culture building, and embracing sustainable leadership practices. Participants will learn how to apply the change theories and concepts introduced in the course to practice through course readings, online discussions with the instructor and colleagues, group work, active examination of daily practice in schools, and personal reflection. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to communicate in clear manners that articulate, convey and deepen the understandings others have of issues affecting their communities.
  2. Students will be able to collaborate on democratic processes.
  3. Students will be able to communicate engage in critical social analysis and how the status quo fits into a larger movement for social change.

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ELAD 2340. Multicultural Leadership in Education

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to the social and cultural constructions of gender, class, and race. Students will critically apply theoretical constructs to everyday life and discuss the intersection of gender and race with class inequality in national and global contexts. Using a social justice framework, readings, and assignments integrate a variety of racial/ethnic groups while considering the effects of historically uneven resource distribution, unearned privilege, forms of domination and subordination, immigration status, and cultural representation and ideologies. Participants will learn how to apply the change theories and concepts introduced in the course to practice through course readings, online discussions with the instructor and colleagues, group work, active examination of daily practice in schools, and personal reflection. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will develop awareness of their own social identities.
  2. Students will recognize differences among various communities, perspectives, and world-views.
  3. Students will describe how privilege and biases impact our communities and systems.
  4. Students will create meaningful peer-to-peer relationships.
  5. Students will understand the impact of their actions on community members.
  6. Students will identify their leadership skills to shape social change on and off campus.
  7. Students will act on opportunities to promote social change.
  8. Students will use academic resources including advising, computers, printing, library, and space.

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ELAD 2996. Special Topics in Educational Leadership

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Special topics course in education for undergraduate students. Course will be identified by a subtitle. May be repeated up to 12 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to engage in systems thinking which aids in seeing how individual situations are shaped by a broader contexts
  2. Students will be able to understand how to apply theoretical frameworks for understanding social problems.
  3. Students will be able to help develop leadership capacity in others.
  4. Students will be able to gain an understanding of cultural competence, which recognizes that diverse perspectives strengthen the dialogue and approaches to solving social problems.

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ELAD 3110V. Introduction to Educational Leadership in a Global Society

3 Credits (3)

Multinational educational systems covered through knowledge of the U.S. system of education promoting critical leadership roles every citizen plays in the success of educational systems. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will share reflections on issues of national and global importance in the field of educational leadership.

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ELAD 3210. Current Issues In Educational Leadership

3 Credits (3)

This course addresses issues such as the rise in international education, education's costs, social media's role and influence, changes in state and national funding trends, student and faculty/staff diversity, among others. The focus of this course is centered on the actions and responses of administrators to the current issues they are facing. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will identify the overarching issues that leaders in educational institutions are or will be facing;
  2. Students will articulate a more multicultural perspective through which to view the possible impact of these current issues on both those within the institution and those who are impacted by these institutions;
  3. Students will reconstruct their perspective to allow for a greater awareness of the how these current issues might differentially impact culturally, linguistically, and socio-economically diverse populations;
  4. Students will criticize inequitable examples of unfair educational policy and explore ways in which to develop culturally responsive practices when addressing current issues

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ELAD 3996. Special Topics in Education

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Special topics course in education for undergraduate students. Course will be identified by a subtitle. May be repeated up to 12 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Objectives change based on course content.

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ELAD 4110. Management of Student Services

3 Credits (3)

History and overview of student services (e.g., admissions, counseling, registration, financial aid, housing, food services, student organizations) for early entry level positions. This course will provide students with an examination of foundations and principals of student services. Important theories and essential competencies needed in order to be successful will be explored through a social justice perspective of leadership. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Explain the origins of student services concerning social and historical events programs.
  2. Describe the theoretical foundations and development of student services.
  3. Evaluate the organizational and administrative models for the delivery of student services
  4. Critique inequity issues in student services as they relate to institutions of higher education and how social justice action might improve or eliminate such inequities.
  5. Explain the primary legal foundations, ethical standards, and daily operation of student services programs.

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ELAD 4120. Principles of Education Law and Policy

3 Credits (3)

Overview of the use of law and policy in schools and higher education. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze the options on policy issues using the statutes, cases, regulations, and legislative history as their tools.
  2. Evaluate legal developments in higher education.
  3. Synthesis legal trends in their particular area of professional interest.
  4. Compare and contrast how higher education law differs between private and public higher education.

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ELAD 4130. Principles of Education Budgeting and Finance

3 Credits (3)

Analysis of budget and finance practices in education. Restricted to: E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify opportunities to use research and individual projects to explore issues related to topics of interest to them
  2. Describe ways in which budget and finance skills are important to administrators in college and university settings
  3. Distinguish how financial and budgetary issues vary with respect to state, private, and various funding sources within higher education

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ELAD 4410. Foundation for School Library Specialists

3 Credits (3)

Elements of librarianship. Introduction to the history, purpose, and role of the school library. Overview of current issues and legislation affecting school libraries. Taught with ELAD 5410. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand basic competencies for library specialists.

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ELAD 4420. Administration of the School Library

3 Credits (3)

Principles and practices related to the function, structure, and management of school libraries. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand basic competencies for library administration.

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ELAD 4510. Elements of Research

3 Credits (3)

This course provides students with a foundation for understanding educational research. The course will also provide grounding in proper writing format for use in the education profession. Students will be introduced to various research paradigms and the symbiosis of theory and practice. Besides introducing students to the symbiosis of theory and practice, students will complete assignments and activities that demonstrate the use of that symbiosis. Ultimately, students will be able to use the knowledge they gain through the course to be able to critique educational research. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Define what good research entails
  2. Critique journal articles dealing with educational leadership
  3. Use proper APA format in writing papers and written discussion
  4. Use ethical standards for decision making in research

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ELAD 4998. Internship

3 Credits (3)

The undergraduate Educational Leadership major requires that students complete two internships. Internships provide students with either experience working in an area of administration that is different from the student's regular job or experience conducting research for a program or project. Each internship placement site and scope of work is determined through consultation with the course instructor. Students must complete 120 hours of work with the selected internship site. Student must be an E AD major and be within (at least) one year of graduation. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will gain experience in a work/administrative setting under the supervision of a experienced administrator.

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ELAD 5110. The Principalship

3 Credits (3)

Key issues surrounding the role of school-site leaders. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or better; .

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will examine the complexities of school leadership.
  2. Students will create a school culture representative of their own core values.
  3. Students will assess the role and importance of the principal in facilitating change, managing conflict, promoting an active anti-racist environment, celebrating diversity, and establishing accountability for all students’ learning.

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ELAD 5120. Leadership and Administration of Bilingual Education

3 Credits (3)

Concepts and practical approaches to improving the education of English languages learners through higher education. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or higher; .

Learning Outcomes
  1. Examine the complexity and overarching issues encompassing the role of the school leader as it pertains to the broader and narrower goals of bilingual education
  2. Develop critical understandings of educating equitably, involving the development and sustainability of bilingual education programs which focus on making schooling meaningful and comprehensible for the millions of children whose home languages are different from the dominant language of school and society

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ELAD 5130. Basing Decision on Data: Pk-12

3 Credits (3)

Analysis of accountability data and other evidence to support educational decision making. Disaggregating and interpreting assessment data to guide improvement of instruction. Moving from evidence to plans for action. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of instructor is required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or better.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify various types of data and their uses in decision-making
  2. Identify federal and state assessment programs, as well as local assessment requirements, and the policies that drive them
  3. Explain how data from multiple sources is used to inform decision making about student achievement

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ELAD 5140. Educational Financial Management

3 Credits (3)

Educational finance and business applications. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or better; .

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and be able to use and explain to lay people the technical language used to discuss education finance issues.
  2. Analyze, interpret, and present financial data, trends, and issues to various publics served by the schools and outline possible actions and their implications

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ELAD 5150. Public School Law

3 Credits (3)

Legal processes of education, major court decisions, and the legislative process will be studied. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or better. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or better; .

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the critical issues involved in applying the law fairly and justly
  2. Understand the complex nature of the federal, state, and local authority levels as they relate to applying statutory and constitutional law

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ELAD 5160. Management of Educational Change: Public Schools

3 Credits (3)

Leadership in implementing innovations in education. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or better.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will gain insight into how the structure of schools in the United States impacts the success of failure of educational change and reform.
  2. Students will understand the role of implementing or resisting educational change efforts

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ELAD 5170. Special Education Administration

3 Credits (3)

Competencies for the administration of special education programs with an emphasis upon New Mexico public school standards. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or better. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or better.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Knowledge of interactive systems and sub-systems and the influence of internal and external environments on the supervisory and improvement processes.
  2. Understanding of research and effective professional development practices tied to curriculum, improvement of instructional delivery and student achievement.

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ELAD 5180. Internship Public Schools Part I

3 Credits (3)

First half of a practical internship in Pk-12 schools under supervision of school administrator. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. 3 years of Pk-12 teaching experience required. Restricted to: E AD majors. . May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 18 cr. of ELAD course work; 3.0 GPA or better.

Learning Outcomes
  1. A clear understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the school leader in an adaptive, culturally diverse and changing environment
  2. Provide a platform for prospective leaders to analytically reflect on the complexity of ethical cases in which the school administrator is likely to confront in the scope of his/her administrative career in public education

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ELAD 5185. Internship: Public Schools Part II

3 Credits (3)

Second half of a practical internship in Pk-12 administrative setting under supervision of experienced higher education administrator. Internship site determined by class instructor and graduate student. The class must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to: E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ELAD 5180; 3.0 GPA or better.

Learning Outcomes
  1. A understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the school leader in an adaptive, culturally diverse and changing environment.
  2. Provide a platform for prospective leaders to analytically reflect on the complexity of ethical cases in which the school administrator is likely to confront in the scope of his/her administrative career in public education.

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ELAD 5210. Community College Administration

3 Credits (3)

An overview of the history, role, objectives and patterns governing the effectiveness of the community college. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or better; .

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the purpose of higher education and how this purpose has changed and affected various types of community colleges and universities and groups of people;
  2. Consider how organization, governance, and finance in higher education vary by institutional type, control, and mission;

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ELAD 5215. Higher Education Administration

3 Credits (3)

This course provides an overview of higher education in the United States including history, mission, and governance, in the context of organizational theory. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or better.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the purpose of higher education and how this purpose has changed and affected various types of community colleges and universities and groups of people
  2. Consider how organization, governance, and finance in higher education vary by institutional type, control and mission
  3. Gain familiarity with major issues facing U.S. higher education

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ELAD 5220. Management of Educational Change: Higher Education

3 Credits (3)

Leadership in implementing innovations in education in higher education. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to: E AD majors.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or better.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Student will gain the insight into how the structure of schools in the United States impacts the success or failure of educational change.
  2. Student will understand the role of implementing or resisting educational change efforts

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ELAD 5230. Higher Education Finance and Funding

3 Credits (3)

This course examines the impact and process of financing and funding higher education. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or better.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify opportunities to use research and individual projects to explore issues related to issues of topics of interest
  2. Describe the ways in which budget and finance skills are important to administrators in college and university settings
  3. Distinguish how financial and budgetary issues vary with respect to state, private, and various funding sources within higher education

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ELAD 5240. Management of Student Services in Higher Education

3 Credits (3)

History and overview of student services (e.g., admissions, counseling, registration, financial aid, housing, food services, student organizations) and a review of management components used in student services. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or better.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Explain the origins of student services in relationship to social and historical events
  2. Describe the theoretical foundations and development of student services.
  3. Evaluate the organizational and administrative models for the delivery of student services programs.

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ELAD 5250. Higher Education Law

3 Credits (3)

This course is designed to review the impact of the legal process and the judiciary on higher education. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or better.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze the options on policy issues using the statues, cases, regulations, and legislative history as their tool.
  2. Evaluate legal developments in higher education.
  3. Synthesis legal trends in their particular area of professional interest.

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ELAD 5260. Administration of Adult and Continuing Education

3 Credits (3)

Administration of programs in public schools, higher education, community and nontraditional educational settings. The class must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or higher; .

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze adult education theory and the intersection of social justice to inform adult education program planning.
  2. Assess the needs of specific populations for adult education programming

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ELAD 5270. Basing Decision on Data: Higher Education.

3 Credits (3)

Analysis of accountability data and other evidence to support educational decision making. Disaggregating and interpreting assessment data to guide improvement of instruction. Moving from evidence to plans for action. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or higher; .

Learning Outcomes
  1. Participants will understand the importance of using assessment data in decision-making and identify reasons why these skills are important to educational leaders in college and university settings.
  2. Participants will evaluate the assessment structure of one institution or department in higher education, using a criteria-based measurement tool (rubric).
  3. Participants will reflect on possibilities of using assessment data to further social justice outcomes in higher education.

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ELAD 5280. Internship: Higher Education Part I

3 Credits (3)

First half of practical internship in administrative setting under supervision of experienced higher education administrator. Internship site determined by class instructor and graduate student. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Restricted to: E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 15 credits of ELAD coursework and consent of instructor; .

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the roles and responsibilities of the school leader in an adaptive, culturally diverse and changing environment
  2. Will provide a platform for leaders to analytically reflect on the complexity of ethical cases in which the administrator will confront in the scope of administrative role

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ELAD 5285. Internship: Higher Education Part II

3 Credits (3)

Second half of a practical internship in an administrative setting under supervision of an experienced higher education administrator. Internship placement determined by class instructor and graduate student. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to: E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ELAD 5280; 3.0 GPA or better; .

Learning Outcomes
  1. Enhance knowledge and practice of higher education administration, keeping in mind that experiences should provide opportunities for thoughtful examination of the diversity of the ways and manners in which office supervisors and staff conduct their work.
  2. Provide practical experience and opportunity to examine and apply learned theoretical concepts within a supportive, supervised environment.
  3. Develop skills related to higher education management and leadership.

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ELAD 5310. Leadership for Social Justice and Equity

3 Credits (3)

Examine cultural diversity and how appropriate understanding, leadership and instructional strategies can be used to reach all learners. Enhances understanding of what it means to be an educator in culturally diverse contexts. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or better, .

Learning Outcomes
  1. Acquired knowledge of multicultural issues as they relate to race, ethnicity, class, and gender and how these factors intersect with current educational leadership trends;
  2. Developed a more multicultural perspective which will lead to greater awareness of the needs of culturally, linguistically, and socio-economically diverse students and an ability to develop/enhance an educational leadership lens designed to promote equity and access for all students;

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ELAD 5320. Educational Leadership, Supervision, and Evaluation

3 Credits (3)

Leadership, supervision, and evaluation in Pk-12 and post secondary education. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or better. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or higher; .

Learning Outcomes
  1. To acquire a basic knowledge of the processes, persons, and practices of educational leadership and supervision.
  2. To develop personalized understandings of leadership and supervisory roles.
  3. To relate leadership and supervision theory to practice.
  4. To develop a concept of good administrative/supervisory practice.
  5. To develop a diverse awareness of leadership and supervisory issues and techniques.

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ELAD 5410. Foundation for School Library Specialists

3 Credits (3)

Elements of librarianship. Introduction to the history, purpose, and role of the school library. Overview of current issues and legislation affecting school libraries. Same as ELAD 4410. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand basic competencies for library specialists.

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ELAD 5510. Elements of Research

3 Credits (3)

Survey and analysis of research methods and designs focusing on sound educational research and its presentation. The course must be passed with a grade of "B" or higher. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to E AD majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or better; .

Learning Outcomes
  1. Explain the purpose of research
  2. Analyze the need for research by practicing educational administrators
  3. Describe the differences between qualitative research and quantitative research

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ELAD 5992. Special Problems.

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Offered under various subtitles which indicate the subject matter covered. May be taken for a maximum of 3 credits per semester and a total of 6 credits overall. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Objectives will vary based on course content.

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ELAD 5996. Special Topics

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Offered under various subtitles which indicate the subject matter covered. May be taken for a maximum of 6 credits. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Objectives change based on course content.

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ELAD 5997. Independent Studies

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Individual investigation in special topic areas. Requires prior approval of project advisor. May be repeated up to 9 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Objectives change based on course content.

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ELAD 6110. Organizational Theory

3 Credits (3)

The overarching objectives of this class is to prepare educational leaders who comprehend the complexities of educational organizations, especially those with significant underrepresented populations; to initiate or maintain leaders’ commitment to educational programs that embrace all learners; and to promote within leaders an understanding of the necessity of upholding social justice, primarily as it applies to issues, such as race, ethnicity, class, ability, religion, and gender. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to: E AD majors.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and implement organizational theory.

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ELAD 6120. Elements of Research

3 Credits (3)

Advanced survey and analysis of research methods and designs focusing on sound educational research and its presentation. Consent of Instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Evaluate self within educational research, Analyze what good research entails
  2. Use proper APA (7th ed.) format in writing papers and in written discussions
  3. Synthesize scholarly literature, Understand social justice in research and practice
  4. Work on small pieces of active research to gain an understanding of what it entails

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ELAD 6210. Quantitative Research I

3 Credits (3)

Explores quantitative research methods, the rationale and assumptions that guide statistical decisions, beginning level statistical analyses, and how all of these are applied in the field of educational leadership. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify the tasks and processes required to formulate appropriate research problems within educational settings, design relevant qualitative research strategies; for examining such problems, select pertinent data sources, data collection methods, and data analysis methods, and assess the results of such efforts.

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ELAD 6220. Qualitative Research I

3 Credits (3)

Explores qualitative research methods and models and their application in the field of educational leadership. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify the tasks and processes required to formulate appropriate research problems within educational settings, design relevant qualitative research strategies; for examining such problems, select pertinent data sources, data collection methods, and data analysis methods, and assess the results of such efforts.

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ELAD 6310. Concepts of Leadership in Education

3 Credits (3)

Survey of concepts of leadership in general and educational leadership in particular. Consideration of implications for practice. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and implement important concepts central to effective educational leadership

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ELAD 6320. Foundations of Educational Administration

3 Credits (3)

Advanced course about the political, economic, and social forces on policy making and governance of Pk-12 and postsecondary education. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will gain an understanding of the concepts of school leadership, and the political, social and economic contexts that impact schools.

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ELAD 6410. Quantitative Research II

3 Credits (3)

Intermediate quantitative methods of research, statistical analyses, and their application in the field of educational leadership. Restricted to Doctoral students only. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ELAD 6210.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify the tasks and processes required to formulate appropriate research problems within educational settings, design relevant qualitative research strategies; for examining such problems, select pertinent data sources, data collection methods, and data analysis methods, and assess the results of such efforts in more detail than in Qualitative Research I.
  2. Students will conduct a mini study to prepare for dissertation seminar.

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ELAD 6510. Qualitative Research II

3 Credits (3)

Advanced qualitative methods of research and implementation in the field of educational leadership. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: ELAD 6220.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify the tasks and processes required to formulate appropriate research problems within educational settings, design relevant qualitative research strategies; for examining such problems, select pertinent data sources, data collection methods, and data analysis methods, and assess the results of such efforts in more detail than in Qualitative Research I.
  2. Students will conduct a mini study to prepare for dissertation seminar.

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ELAD 6520. Public School Law

3 Credits (3)

Advanced course in which the legal processes of education, major court decisions, and the legislative process will be studied. Consent of Instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. The student will articulate an understanding of basic legal concepts through examination and discussion of relevant court cases.

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ELAD 6525. Higher Education Law

3 Credits (3)

This advanced course is designed to review the impact of the judiciary on higher education. The legal standing of institutions of higher education on issues of staff rights, student rights, and tort liability will be addressed. In addition, the impact of local ordinances, state and federal laws and regulations will be examined. Consent of Instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Consider CRT’s usefulness in educational research and what makes a CRT analysis unique or different from other analyses.

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ELAD 6610. Scholarly Writing and the Southwest Border

3 Credits (3)

This course is designed to provide doctoral-level students with an opportunity to engage with scholarly and academic writing in a meaningful manner. Scholarly writing and academic writing are often used interchangeably. They will be used in that manner for this course. Generally defined, academic writing refers to a particular style of expression that researchers use to define the intellectual boundaries of their disciplines and their areas of expertise. Scholarly writing is the specific genre of writing that is used in all academic fields. For this course, the scholarly writing is contained to the context of the Southwest Border and Borderland issues. This is designed in consideration of and relates to the Department and Program's mission, which takes into account social justice and border education issues. Additionally, the course will cover topics associated with scholarly writing that include, but not limited to: formal language, tone, precision, clarity, word choice, and assumptive statements versus research-supported rationale. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to: E AD majors.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and implement place-based writing through and about the Southwest Border.

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ELAD 6620. Evaluation Design in Education

3 Credits (3)

Advanced course that focuses on evaluation and accountability models; application to educational programs. Consent of Instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Objectives change based on course content.

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ELAD 6630. Educational Financial Management

3 Credits (3)

This advanced course offers an overview of economic and financial concerns relating to the public school system of the United States. Consent of Instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will gain an understanding of the basic concepts of school budgeting and finance practices.

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ELAD 6635. Higher Education Finance and Funding

3 Credits (3)

This advanced course examines the impact and process of financing and funding higher education. The course is an examination of higher education finance as it relates to operational budgets, capital budgets, and policy issues which impact the financing of higher education. Consent of Instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will study the impact of the higher education budget on various departments and services at the university level.

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ELAD 6710. The Professoriate

3 Credits (3)

The purpose of this course is to explore the body of scholarly knowledge and research appropriate for the study of American higher education, the context in which teaching and learning occurs, and faculty's roles in the process. We will discuss the number, variety, and purpose of the various types of institutions; the different roles that faculty members play within these institutions; how faculty work is assessed and valued within the outside of the university; administrative regulations related to faculty work; current issues related to the general state of the professoriate; as well as how does one prepare to enter the professoriate.

ELAD 6910. Dissertation Seminar

3 Credits (3)

Same as CEPY 6450. Non-majors may be permitted to enroll in this course under limited circumstances with the permission of the course instructor, department head, and graduate school dean. Consent of Instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Formulate a research purpose and driving question about a specific topic.

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ELAD 6991. Doctoral Research

1-15 Credits (1-15)

Research. Consent of Instructor required. Thesis/Dissertation Grading. May be repeated up to 88 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Objectives for this course include submitting a pre-proposal, proposal, and final copy of the dissertation for committee consideration.

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ELAD 6996. Selected Topics

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Offered under various subtitles which indicate the subject matter covered. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Objectives change based on course content.

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ELAD 6998. Advanced Internship

1-6 Credits (1-6)

For those pursuing an advanced degree to meet the field work requirement. To bear an appropriate subtitle. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will gain experience in a work/administrative setting under the supervision of a experienced administrator.

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ELAD 7000. Doctoral Dissertation

1-9 Credits (1-9)

Dissertation. Minimum of 3 credits per regular semester. May be taken for a maximum of 36 credits. Consent of instructor required. May be repeated up to 36 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Objectives for this course include submitting a pre-proposal, proposal, and final copy of the dissertation for committee consideration.

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Reading Courses

READ 3110. Instruction for Special Reading Needs

3 Credits (3)

Emphasizes appropriate techniques for teaching reading to learners with special needs. Restricted to: TEP: EED, ECED, SED, and SPED majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will demonstrate basic knowledge of the five domains of reading;
  2. Students will demonstrate knowledge of characteristics of reading disabilities (including dyslexia) and the cognitive and linguistic difficulties that may underlie these disabilities;
  3. Students will recognize the cultural, environmental and social factors that can impact reading success;
  4. Students will explore instructional practices in phonological awareness, phonics, spelling, vocabulary and comprehension that are consistent with current scientific research findings;
  5. Students will use or analyze informal and/or criterion-based assessments for determining students’ skills in phonological awareness, word identification, and reading fluency and for determining appropriate instructional goals for students;
  6. Students will be able to develop a Professional Learning Community by researching and sharing the effectiveness of various strategies/methods/commercial programs for different domains of reading.

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READ 3996. Special Topics

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Each course will be identified by a qualifying subtitle. A maximum of 3 credits in any one semester and a grand total of 6 credits. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of a specific literacy topic.

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READ 4310. Elementary School Literacy I

3 Credits (2+2P)

Reading development, curriculum, and instruction in the elementary grades. Required of all elementary education majors. Restricted to: TEP-EED majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Articulate an understanding of developmental theories and processes and their implication for appropriate methods of teaching reading;
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of various instructional approaches and strategies for promoting literacy within an integrated curriculum framework;
  3. Provide and use anti-bias literacy materials and experiences, including primary language materials;
  4. Plan appropriate whole group, small group and individual activities that include culturally and linguistically responsive instruction and appropriate accommodations for working with children with special needs;
  5. Understand and articulate the concept of emergent literacy and the processes toward becoming an authentic reader and writer;
  6. Understand the role of family and community in literacy development and respect and promote the use of the child’s home language for learning;
  7. Engage in reflection on current theoretical perspectives on the reading process and the role of print literacy in schools and our society;
  8. Demonstrate knowledge of and use effectively, a wide range of literacy assessment strategies and instruments to determine a child’s strengths and areas of need.

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READ 4320. Elementary School Literacy II

3 Credits (2+2P)

Reading development in curriculum and instruction with assessment and evaluation in the elementary grades (K 8). Restricted to: TEP-EED majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: READ 4310.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in reflection on current theoretical perspectives on the reading process, such as understanding linguistics, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics and their relationships in the reading process,and the role of literacy in schools and our society;
  2. Apply knowledge of various instructional approaches and strategies for promoting literacy within an integrated curriculum framework to include culturally and linguistically responsive instruction and appropriate accommodations for working with children with special needs;
  3. Evaluate instructional materials in terms of their approach to reading, consider their possible use with children, and adapt the materials so that they reflect an appreciation for child-centeredness and cultural diversity in learning;
  4. Use miscue analysis and other literacy assessment tools to understand, describe, and evaluate students’ reading strategies and formulate an instructional plan tied to assessment;
  5. Utilize children’s literature, including multicultural, multilingual children’s literature to plan, implement and reflect on innovative strategies for literacy scaffolding;
  6. Define oneself as a literate person and revalue readers and writers, and users of language.

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READ 4330. Content Area Literacy

3 Credits (2+2P)

Surveys integrated reading/writing/discursive practices in middle/secondary content areas. Taught with READ 5330. Restricted to: TEP-SED majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze literacy processes, as they pertain to adolescent learners.
  2. Discuss current trends and issues in content area literacy instruction with a specific focus on practices that promote achievement and equity.
  3. Evaluate instructional practices that help students use reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and visually representing to learn the content areas.
  4. Illustrate ethical reasoning and decision making in your approach to content area literacy education.
  5. Integrate research, reflection, and best practices that positively impact students in a diverse society.

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READ 5210. Language and Literacy Acquisition

3 Credits (3)

Framework and strategies of language and literacy acquisition with attention to bilingual learners and the interrelationship among reading, writing, and oral language. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

READ 5220. Sociopsycholinguistics of Reading

3 Credits (3)

Examines current research on reading process, learning to read, and teaching children to read and evaluates current programs and materials. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

READ 5310. Elementary School Literacy I

3 Credits (2+2P)

Reading development, curriculum, and instruction in the elementary grades. Same as READ 4310 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Corequisite: ECED 5810, EDUC 5310, and EDUC 5320.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Articulate an understanding of developmental theories and processes and their implication for appropriate methods of teaching reading;
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of various instructional approaches and strategies for promoting literacy within an integrated curriculum framework;
  3. Provide and use anti-bias literacy materials and experiences, including primary language materials;
  4. Plan appropriate whole group, small group and individual activities that include culturally and linguistically responsive instruction and appropriate accommodations for working with children with special needs;
  5. Understand and articulate the concept of emergent literacy and the processes toward becoming an authentic reader and writer;
  6. Understand the role of family and community in literacy development and respect and promote the use of the child’s home language for learning;
  7. Engage in reflection on current theoretical perspectives on the reading process and the role of print literacy in schools and our society;
  8. Demonstrate knowledge of and use effectively, a wide range of literacy assessment strategies and instruments to determine a child’s strengths and areas of need.

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READ 5320. Elementary School Literacy II

3 Credits (2+2P)

Reading development in curriculum and instruction with assessment and evaluation in the elementary grades (K-8). Same as READ 4320 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: READ 5310.

Corequisite: EDUC 5330.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in reflection on current theoretical perspectives on the reading process, such as understanding linguistics, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics and their relationships in the reading process,and the role of literacy in schools and our society;
  2. Apply knowledge of various instructional approaches and strategies for promoting literacy within an integrated curriculum framework to include culturally and linguistically responsive instruction and appropriate accommodations for working with children with special needs;
  3. Evaluate instructional materials in terms of their approach to reading, consider their possible use with children, and adapt the materials so that they reflect an appreciation for child-centeredness and cultural diversity in learning;
  4. Use miscue analysis and other literacy assessment tools to understand, describe, and evaluate students’ reading strategies and formulate an instructional plan tied to assessment;
  5. Utilize children’s literature, including multicultural, multilingual children’s literature to plan, implement and reflect on innovative strategies for literacy scaffolding;
  6. Define oneself as a literate person and revalue readers and writers, and users of language.

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READ 5330. Content Area Literacy

3 Credits (3)

Surveys integrated reading/writing/discursive practices in middle/secondary content areas. "Master' plus Secondary Licensure students Only" and "TEP admission required" May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 5105, EDUC 5120, EDUC 5110.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Define the purpose of schooling begin to articulate the implications for the teacher, youth, teaching, and learning.
  2. Explore the historical dimensions of reading instruction in secondary education.
  3. Explore the quality and character of life in schools along with the implications for all stakeholders.
  4. Explore the roles of reading, writing, listening, and speaking in the content areas.
  5. Discuss general pedagogical considerations that extend across all subject matter.
  6. Promote the concept that learning in all areas is more authentic and meaningful when knowledge of diverse youth and their communities, content, and pedagogy are valued.
  7. Practice strategies that integrate literacy, content, and knowledge of youth.
  8. Explore literature in the content area.
  9. Develop lesson plans that combine reading, writing, listening, and speaking in the content area that support diversity, integrate technology, and promote effective communication 1
  10. Examine the needs of struggling readers. 1
  11. Examine the Common Core Standards. 1
  12. Engage in research and writing that supports the development of your professional identity as an educator and graduate-level student.

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READ 5340. Literacy Assessment and Evaluation

3 Credits (3)

Theoretical and practical aspects of using formal and informal assessment and evaluation procedures in literacy curriculum and instruction. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to understand and implement various strategies for assessing and evaluating the literacy practices and knowledge of students.

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READ 5350. Adult and Family Literacy

3 Credits (3)

Principles, practices, and instructional materials for adult and family literacy. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to understand and implement various strategies for engaging students and their families through literacy practices in a variety of classroom and home settings.

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READ 5360. Digital Literacies

3 Credits (3)

Digital Literacies study focuses on the multiple relationships between how we express ourselves to one another and the multiple technological systems and networks that provide context, meaning, and shape to those expressions in both social and academic spaces. This course is designed to examine new literacies theory as it applies to teaching applications and current research on digital literacies within K-12 education. As 21st Century practitioner scholars, we are concerned with both the social aspects of literacy practices, understanding that school-based operations are inseparable from the sociocultural contexts in which they are enacted. Must be an NMSU graduate student to participate in this course.

Prerequisite: READ 5340 with a B- or better.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Critically assess K-12 implementation of digital literacies across content area curriculum and instruction.
  2. Examine seminal and current research on digital literacies’ theory, pedagogy, and practice.
  3. Determine the level of cultural relevance in schools and pedagogies for 21st Century students.
  4. Interpret how social categories relevant to digital literacy contribute to construction of identity.
  5. Develop a critical digital pedagogy that addresses the literacy practices of all learners.

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READ 5410. Theory and Pedagogy of Literature for Children and Adolescents

3 Credits (3)

This course provides an in-depth exploration of pedagogy and theory related to literature for adolescents. Students must be in Graduate Standing. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze literacy processes, as they pertain to adolescent learners.
  2. Discuss current trends and issues in content area literacy instruction with a specific focus on practices that promote achievement and equity.
  3. Evaluate instructional practices that help students use reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and visually representing to learn the content areas.
  4. Illustrate ethical reasoning and decision making in your approach to content area literacy education.
  5. Integrate research, reflection, and best practices that positively impact students in a diverse society.

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READ 5420. Theory and Pedagogy of Writing

3 Credits (3)

This course is designed to examine critical writing theory and pedagogy for K-12 teaching and learning, including inclusive and multicultural approaches, with an emphasis in constructive, collaborative practices, and the integration of digital tools across several genres of writing. Through sequential, thematic units, coursework will emphasize: 1) the study of formative theories along with the development of instructional practices to promote achievement and equity in writing education; 2) the application of these skills through pedagogy and curriculum building, and 3) the construction of broad understandings of craft within the context of the current policies and standards which impact education both regionally and nationally.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Critically assess writing curriculum and instruction in K-12 learning environments.
  2. Develop a critical writing pedagogy that addresses the literacy practices of all learners.
  3. Measure the alignment of writing structures in schools with students’ cultural literacies.
  4. Interpret how social categories relevant to education contribute to construction of identity.
  5. Formulate engaging strategies that develop writers who are competent in multiple genres.

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READ 5990. Practicum in Literacy Education

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Supervised laboratory experience with children with reading difficulties. The student implements a program of specific procedures to aid the disabled reader. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Prerequisite: READ 5340.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to understand and implement various strategies for assessing and evaluating the literacy practices and knowledge of students.

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READ 5992. Special Studies in Literacy

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Each study will be designated by a qualifying subtitle. Taught with READ 6992. May be repeated up to 99 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in a specific literacy topic.

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READ 5996. Selected Topics in Literacy

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Offered under different subtitles in the Schedule of Classes. Taught with READ 6996 with differentiated subjects for doctoral students. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of a specific literacy topic.

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READ 6110. Critical Issues in Literacy Education

3 Credits (3)

Critical issues from historical to current perspectives. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the multiple critical issues central to literacy education from both a historical and contemporary perspective.

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READ 6120. Multiple Critical Literacies

3 Credits (3)

An exploration of the multiple literacies that operate on the individual, classroom, community, cultural and societal levels. Same as BLED 6120. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

READ 6130. Multiculturalism, Literature, and Inquiry

3 Credits (3)

Advanced exploration and examination of critical multicultural language education vis-a-vis children's adolescent, young adult, and adult literature, with an eye toward problematizing assumptions about literacy, articulating issues of social justice and enacting transactive, transformative pedagogy. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the theories and approaches necessary for conducting inquiry reading and writing.

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READ 6210. Ethnography of Reading and Writing

3 Credits (3)

Covers the dynamics of data interpretation and critical analysis in the study of literacy. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the theories and approaches necessary for conducting ethnographic studies in reading and writing.

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READ 6320. Praxis and Reflexivity

3 Credits (3)

The cyclical research processes of continuous self and systemic (re)evaluation vis-a-vis classroom, community, and society with an eye toward reflection, growth, change, and larger forms of social agency. Restricted to doctoral-level students of any major. Same as BLED 6220, EDUC 6220. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

READ 6991. Doctoral Research in Literacy

1-15 Credits (1-15)

Research on topic of interest. May be repeated up to 88 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of a specific literacy topic at the doctoral level.

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READ 6992. Special Studies in Literacy

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Offered under different subtitles in the Schedule of Classes. Taught with READ 5992 with differentiated assignments for doctoral students. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of a specific literacy topic at the doctoral level.

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READ 6996. Selected Topics in Literacy

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Offered under various subtitles that indicate the subject matter. Same as READ 5996. May be repeated up to 99 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of a specific literacy topic at the doctoral level.

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READ 6997. Independent Study Topics in Reading

1-6 Credits (1-6)

A problem and seminar course for those pursuing an advanced degree. Each course will have an appropriate subtitle. May be repeated up to 99 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of a specific literacy topic at the doctoral level.

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READ 6999. Research Project

1-15 Credits (1-15)

Offered primarily for those pursuing the research requirement for the Ed.S. degree. Each research project will be designated by a qualifying subtitle. May be repeated up to 88 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage in the study of a specific literacy topic at the doctoral level.

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Special Education Courses

SPED 2996. Topics

3 Credits (3)

Offered under various subtitles that indicate the subject matter to be covered. May be repeated up to 9 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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SPED 3105. Introduction to Special Education in a Diverse Society

3 Credits (3)

Characteristics, identification, and educational needs of exceptional learners. Attention is given to the various types of programs serving exceptional learners. Designed for all professional personnel who work with exceptional learners. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Discuss historical and current legislation pertaining to exceptional learners and their families and its impact on professional practice in the field.
  2. Discuss historical and current legislation pertaining to exceptional learners and their families and its impact on professional practice in the field.
  3. Explain the major components of an IEP and its processes, as well as the roles of learners, families and professionals on the team.
  4. Discuss the different service delivery models and discuss the principles, practices, and pragmatics of inclusion co-teaching.
  5. Analyze the disability categories under (IDEA, 2004), (characteristics, etiology, and diagnostic criteria).
  6. Examine educational considerations for exceptional learners (educational approaches [Universal design and differentiated instruction], assistive technology, accommodations/modifications, and related supports and services).
  7. Employ culturally responsive evidence-based practices to create family/school/community partnerships to promote academic achievement and prepare students for their post-school transitions.
  8. Evaluate and synthesize research literature on a selected topic from current special education research.

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SPED 3110. Bilingual/Multicultural Special Education

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to issues related to the provision of services to culturally and linguistically diverse students with exceptionalities.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will identify implicit and explicit biases.
  2. Students will discuss the cultural characteristics of families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and the barriers of parent engagement in their child’s education.
  3. Students will identify how privilege, power, and inequities exist in the school system and how it impacts the academic achievement of students from culturally linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds.
  4. Students will identify culturally relevant strategies to employ in the classroom to meet the individual learner needs of students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
  5. Students will develop a lesson plan that embeds culturally responsive pedagogy that addresses the individual needs of students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

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SPED 3120. Elementary Curriculum, Methods, and Materials for Special Education in a Diverse Society

3 Credits (3)

Curriculum theory and development for special education programs. Various teaching methods utilized with elementary exceptional learners and techniques involved in identifying, adapting, and developing materials will be addressed. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Evaluate historical and current legislation pertaining to exceptional learners and their families and its impact on professional practice in the field.
  2. Describe the RTI process and its role in determining eligibility for special education services.
  3. Discuss learner diversity (ability, exceptionality, developmental level, learning style, language, gender, ethnicity, etc.) and employ individualized evidence-based culturally responsive instructional practices that build on learners’ strengths and interests.
  4. Create safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments to engage learners with exceptionalities in meaningful learning activities and social interactions that develop communication, emotional well-being, positive social interactions, and self-determination.
  5. Apply classroom management techniques that support learners and focus, on routines, procedures, rules, and positive behavior supports to address behavior.
  6. Apply culturally responsive instructional practices to individualize learning for learners with exceptionalities; taking into consideration individual abilities, interests, learning environments, and cultural and linguistic factors in the planning, selection, development, and adaptation of learning experiences for learners with exceptionalities.
  7. Design differentiated lesson plans that employ the tenets of universal design.

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SPED 4110. Low Incidence Disabilities in a Diverse Society

3 Credits (3)

Examines those disabilities that occur less frequently in the special education population, including hearing loss, visual disorders, autism, and other severe manifestations. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Low Incidence Disabilities (characteristics, etiology, and diagnostic criteria) (IDEIA, 2004).
  2. Identify the types of related supports and services—assistive technology, environmental and Instructional accommodations/modifications, and related services—available to students with low incidence disabilities to maximize participation in inclusive settings.
  3. Apply culturally responsive instructional practices to individualize learning for learners with low incidence disabilities, taking into consideration individual abilities, interests, learning environments, and cultural and linguistic factors in the planning, selection, development, and adaptation of learning experiences of learners with low incidence disabilities in inclusive environment.
  4. Employ culturally responsive strategies for creating effective family, school, community partnerships.
  5. Discuss culturally responsive strategies that promote collaboration between families, schools, and community agencies/organizations during the student’s transition planning process.
  6. Identify current educational issues impacting students with low incidence disabilities.

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SPED 4120. High Incidence Disabilities in a Diverse Society

3 Credits (3)

Examines those areas of disability that most frequently occur in the special education population, including intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, communication disorders, and behavioral and emotional disorders. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe and compare the major approaches to identifying, placement, assessing, planning for instruction, and classifying high incidence disabilities.
  2. Identify and discuss school-based, sociological, cultural, and economic differences as they relate to etiology and identification of mild disabilities.
  3. Describe and critically evaluate classroom instructional practices that can improve the educational success of students with high incidence disabilities.
  4. Describe and critically evaluate classroom management practices that can improve the educational success of students with high incidence disabilities.
  5. Describe how the educational experiences of persons with mild disabilities is shaped by their cognitive, perceptual, language, academic, and social / emotional characteristics.

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SPED 4130. Reading for Elementary Exceptional Learners in a Diverse Society, K-6

3 Credits (3)

Emphasizes reading diagnosis and materials for students with special developmental and learning problems. Taught with SPED 5130. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Evaluate the sources of reading difficulty
  2. Evaluate the characteristics exhibited by children with reading difficulties and reading disabilities.
  3. Demonstrate how to use non-biased, culturally responsive assessments and progress monitoring data to monitor and evaluate reading performance to drive instruction.
  4. Discuss the stages in literacy development and the factors that influence development of student literacy in reading, writing, speaking, viewing, and listening, including phonological, orthographic, semantic, and syntactic processing.
  5. Implement research-based reading strategies and instruction to promote the development of print awareness, phonological and phonemic awareness, fluency, vocabulary, spelling, comprehension, reading, and writing for learners with reading difficulties.
  6. Evaluate research-based strategies, methods, and commercial programs for different domains of reading.
  7. Create a lesson plan and teach an elementary level reading lesson.

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SPED 4140. Reading for Elementary Exceptional Learners in a Diverse Society, 7-12

3 Credits (3)

Extends information covered in SPED 5130, which covers grades K 6. Strategies and materials are addressed. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate a knowledge of the major component of the reading process.
  2. Increase their repertoire of reading instruction procedures which may be used with students of differing reading abilities and from diverse backgrounds at the middle and secondary levels.
  3. Increase their knowledge of theory and related discipline-specific learning strategies designed to assist middle and secondary students in reading and learning through research based practices.
  4. Participate in discussion of current literacy issues.
  5. Explore the presentation of new teaching and learning strategies as they are related to content area literacy.

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SPED 4150. Secondary Curriculum, Methods, and Materials for Special Education in a Diverse Society

3 Credits (3)

Curriculum theory and development for elementary special education programs. Various teaching methods utilized with secondary exceptional learners and techniques for identifying, adapting, and developing materials will be addressed. Taught with SPED 5150. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Discuss learner diversity (ability, exceptionality, developmental level, learning style, language, gender, ethnicity, etc.)
  2. Apply effective methods for planning and implementing culturally responsive secondary differentiated content area instruction for exceptional learners in inclusive settings.
  3. Identify demands of learning environments of secondary exceptional learners.
  4. Identify basic classroom management theories and strategies for individuals with diverse learning needs in secondary environments.
  5. Employ culturally responsive evidence-based practices to create family/school/community partnerships to promote academic achievement and prepare students for their post-school transitions.

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SPED 4210. Introduction to Assessment of Diverse Exceptional Learners

3 Credits (3)

Theory and use of norm and criterion-referenced instruments and learning theories in the classroom; planning of prescriptive instructional programs. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Compare and contrast the different types of assessment and their purposes.
  2. Identify legislation and litigation, which has impacted assessment.
  3. Explain the applications and uses of assessments results.
  4. Identify widely used (common) measures of psycho-educational assessment and their appropriate application.
  5. Identify a variety of techniques for obtaining information regarding students’ academic functioning and learning techniques.
  6. Identify techniques for assessing students’ socio-emotional functioning.
  7. Outline the process for identifying exceptional learners and subsequent educational planning utilizing learning theories.
  8. Analyze and identify assessment strategies for specific populations (Culturally and Linguistically Diverse, Preschool, Elementary School, etc.)
  9. Integrate information gathered through comprehensive assessment procedures into a whole picture of the student’s areas of strength, weakness and needs.

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SPED 4220. Classroom Management for Diverse Learners

3 Credits (3)

Behavior-change strategies for exceptional learners. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Plan the organization of a classroom illustrating optimum use of instructional resources (computers, books, writing materials, reference material, manipulatives, creative constructive materials, etc.) that facilitates efficiency and effectiveness of access, use, maintenance, and storage of such resources.
  2. Manage student progress data electronically for visual representation of performance for individual students and whole class averages.
  3. Design the organization of the physical aspects of a classroom (furniture, areas, etc) for ease of transition, use, safety and traffic flow based on effective designs presented in the literature.
  4. Establish classroom procedures and expectation (rules) to promote a positive, effective and efficient learning environment.
  5. Construct the organization of a classroom schedule/time management plan that includes various content areas, instructional strategies, grouping strategies, levels of energy use, etc. Within large blocks of time or for an entire day school day.
  6. Demonstrate knowledge and skill of affective domain-based theoretical models for (1) setting and managing the emotional tone of a classroom, (2) managing the psycho-social atmosphere of the classroom and individual students, and (3) managing motivation of students to succeed in learning academic content, social skills, self-responsibility skills, and inter-relationship skills with other class members.
  7. Analyze a given classroom situation for legal, ethical and professional issues and concerns, by applying legal, ethical, and professional reactions to the situation and provide resolutions to align the classroom legally, ethically, and professionally. This will include all legal bases (state and federal) involving all students, including students with disabilities, ESL and at-risk students.
  8. Observe, analyze and document student behavior to match an appropriate intervention strategy to change behavior in a desired direction. This will also include the successful implementation of behavior management strategies for entire classes, small groups, and individual students along with development and maintenance of electronic data collection graphing and analysis.

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SPED 4310. Introduction to Autism

3 Credits (3)

This course will provide an overview of autism spectrum disorders as a triad of impairments, including historical and theoretical perspectives, assessment issues, characteristics of autism, intervention programs, and family issues. Taught with SPED 5310 and SPED 6310. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Autism Spectrum Disorders ASD (characteristics, etiology, co-morbid conditions, differential diagnosis).
  2. Describe the criteria used to screen and diagnose ASD.
  3. Examine evidence-based practices used to effectively support students with ASD in accessing general education and grade level standards (classroom structure, differentiated instruction, peer mediated supports, structured teaching, and emotional supports).
  4. Describe strategies related to promoting a successful transition from school to adult life for individuals with ASD.
  5. Examine the strategies for effective collaboration and communication with families of children with ASD and key stakeholders for the purpose of information sharing and collaborative planning with families.
  6. Identify and investigate current educational issues impacting students with ASD.

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SPED 4320. Behavior and Autism

3 Credits (3)

This course will cover the first of the triad of impairments. Students will gain an understanding of the behaviors of children with autism. Students will examine several behavior management philosophies and research based interventions and how they can be applied in the educational setting. Attention will also be given to play skills. The family perspective and participation in the proactive behavior management process will be incorporated throughout the course. Taught with SPED 532 with differentiated assignments. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: SPED 4310 or SPED 5310 or SPED 6310.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Explain the definition of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and associated characteristics of students with ASD as measured by required readings, discussions, and article reviews.
  2. Explain behavior impairments and characteristics associated with students with ASD as measured by required readings, discussions, and article reviews
  3. Explain Applied Behavior Analysis strategies as measured by completion of required paper(s) summarizing peer-reviewed journal article related to diversity, behavior management interventions, and/or behavior analysis.
  4. Explain information related to individuals with ASD and behavior challenges as measured by participation in online chat with instructor or group power point presentation.
  5. Discuss evidence-based treatment approaches that are useful in improving behavior management skills of students with ASD as measured by participation in required readings and discussions

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SPED 4330. Social Skills and Autism

3 Credits (3)

This course will cover the second of the triad of impairments. As a blend of researched based models and evidenced based practical applications, students will gain an understanding of the social skill deficits often associated with autism spectrum disorders. Review a variety of social cognition theories and explore effective social skill interventions for children functioning at a variety of levels along the autism spectrum. Taught with SPED 5330 and SPED 6330 with differentiated assignments. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: SPED 4310 or SPED 5310 or SPED 6310.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Autism Spectrum Disorders ASD (definition, characteristics, etiology).
  2. Evaluate Social Skills characteristics and difficulties often associated with ASD.
  3. Appraise current tools and strategies used to assess Social Skills problems in children with ASD.
  4. Use assessment results to identify the Social Skills needs of children with ASD
  5. Analyze the types of evidence-based practices used to address the Social Skills needs of children with ASD.
  6. Design an intervention plan to address the Social Skills needs of a child with ASD.
  7. Incorporate family preferences and values into the educational process of students with ASD.
  8. Employ data collection procedures to evaluate the effectiveness of evidence-based practices for students with ASD.

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SPED 4340. Communication and Autism

3 Credits (3)

This course will cover the third of the triad of impairments. Students will gain an overview of communication characteristics and difficulties often associated with autism spectrum disorders. Review current tools and strategies used to assess speech, language, and interaction skills. Use assessment results to identify needs and implement appropriate interventions. Explore a variety of intervention strategies aimed at building receptive, expressive, and pragmatic language of children functioning at a variety of levels along the autism spectrum. Taught with SPED 5340 and SPED 640 with differentiated assignments. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 4310 or SPED 5310 or SPED 6310.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Autism Spectrum Disorders ASD (definition, characteristics, etiology).
  2. Evaluate communication characteristics and difficulties often associated with ASD.
  3. Appraise current tools and strategies used to assess communication problems in children with ASD.
  4. Analyze the types of interventions used to address the communication needs of children with ASD.
  5. Design an intervention plan to address the communication needs of a child with ASD.
  6. Employ data collection procedures to evaluate the effectiveness of research-based interventions for students with ASD.
  7. Incorporate family preferences and values into the educational process of students with ASD.

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SPED 4810. Early Childhood SPED Student Teaching

9 Credits (9P)

Synthesis of knowledge and skills appropriate to teaching in PreK - 3rd grade educational settings. Restricted to: TEP-ECED majors. Grading (S/U, Audit). Students must be Admitted into student teaching May be repeated up to 9 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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SPED 4811. Practicum in Education, Equity and Cultural Diversity

3 Credits (3)

This is a supervised experience in providing special education services to local preK-12 students. In the context of the public school classroom, teacher candidates are guided to apply content knowledge from the seminar meetings and from prior coursework. Restricted to: SPED majors.

Prerequisite: SPED 3105 and SPED 3120 or consent of instructor.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the critical concepts and principles in their discipline and of the pedagogical content knowledge necessary to engage students’ learning of concepts and principles in the discipline;
  2. Candidates create and implement learning experiences that motivate K-8 students, establish a positive learning environment, and support K-8 students’ understanding of the central concepts and principles in the content discipline;
  3. Candidates design, adapt, and select a variety of valid and reliable assessments and employ analytical skills necessary to inform ongoing planning and instruction, as well as to understand, and help students understand their own, progress and growth;
  4. Candidates engage students in reasoning and collaborative problem solving related authentic local, state, national, and global issues, incorporating new technologies and instructional tools appropriate to such tasks. Candidates use research and evidence to continually evaluate and improve their practice, particularly the effects of their choices and actions on others, and they adapt their teaching to meet the needs of each learner;
  5. Candidates design and implement appropriate and challenging learning experiences, based on an understanding of how children learn and develop. They ensure inclusive learning environments that encourage and help all K-8 students reach their full potential across a range of learner goals;
  6. Candidates work with K-8 students and families to create classroom cultures that support individual and collaborative learning and encourage positive social interaction, engagement in learning, and independence;
  7. Candidates build strong relationships with students, families, colleagues, other professionals, and community members, so that all are communicating effectively and collaborating for student growth, development, and well-being;
  8. Candidates reflect on their personal biases and access resources that deepen their own understanding of cultural, ethnic, gender, sexual orientation, language, and learning differences to build stronger relationships and to adapt practice to meet the needs of each learner.

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SPED 4820. Student Teaching SPED

9 Credits (9)

Supervised teaching in a special education classroom and participation in a required seminar. Students must be admitted to student teaching program in order to enroll. Restricted to: SPED majors.

Prerequisite: SPED 4811.

Learning Outcomes
  1. The teacher candidate understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
  2. The teacher candidate uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
  3. The teacher candidate works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

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SPED 4830. Special Education/Elementary Student Teaching Seminar

3 Credits (3)

Discussion of elementary Special Education school issues related to student teaching.

Prerequisite: SPED 4811.

Corequisite: SPED 4820.

Learning Outcomes
  1. The teacher candidate understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
  2. The teacher candidate uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
  3. The teacher candidate works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
  4. The teacher candidate understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content.
  5. The teacher candidate understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.
  6. The teacher candidate understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision making.
  7. The teacher candidate plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context.
  8. The teacher candidate understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways.
  9. The teacher candidate engages in ongoing professional learning and uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner. 1
  10. The teacher candidate seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.

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SPED 4840. Special Education/ Secondary Student Teaching Seminar

3 Credits (3)

Discussion of secondary school issues related to student teaching.

Prerequisite: SPED 4821.

Corequisite: SPED 4820.

Learning Outcomes
  1. The teacher candidate understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
  2. The teacher candidate uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
  3. The teacher candidate works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
  4. The teacher candidate understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content.
  5. The teacher candidate understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.
  6. The teacher candidate understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision making.
  7. The teacher candidate plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context.
  8. The teacher candidate understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways.
  9. The teacher candidate engages in ongoing professional learning and uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner. 1
  10. The teacher candidate seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.

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SPED 4992. Directed Study courses in Special Education

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Each course shall be identified by a qualifying subtitle. A maximum of 3 credits per semester and a grand total of 9 credits. May be repeated up to 9 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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SPED 4996. Topics

3 Credits (3)

Offered under various subtitles which indicate the subject matter to be covered. May be repeated up to 9 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

View Learning Outcomes

SPED 5105. Introduction to Special Education in a Diverse Society

3 Credits (3)

This course introduces the field of special education to regular educators. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Discuss historical and current legislation pertaining to exceptional learners and their families and its impact on professional practice in the field.
  2. Discuss historical and current legislation pertaining to exceptional learners and their families and its impact on professional practice in the field.
  3. Explain the major components of an IEP and its processes, as well as the roles of learners, families and professionals on the team.
  4. Discuss the different service delivery models and discuss the principles, practices, and pragmatics of inclusion co-teaching.
  5. Analyze the disability categories under (IDEA, 2004), (characteristics, etiology, and diagnostic criteria).
  6. Examine educational considerations for exceptional learners (educational approaches [Universal design and differentiated instruction], assistive technology, accommodations/modifications, and related supports and services).
  7. Employ culturally responsive evidence-based practices to create family/school/community partnerships to promote academic achievement and prepare students for their post-school transitions.
  8. Evaluate and synthesize research literature on a selected topic from current special education research.

View Learning Outcomes

SPED 5110. Low Incidence Disabilities in a Diverse Society

3 Credits (3)

Examines those disabilities that occur less frequently in the special education population, including hearing loss, visual disorders, autism, and other severe manifestations. Taught with SPED 6110 with differentiated assignments. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Low Incidence Disabilities (characteristics, etiology, and diagnostic criteria) (IDEIA, 2004).
  2. Identify the types of related supports and services—assistive technology, environmental and Instructional accommodations/modifications, and related services—available to students with low incidence disabilities to maximize participation in inclusive settings.
  3. Apply culturally responsive instructional practices to individualize learning for learners with low incidence disabilities, taking into consideration individual abilities, interests, learning environments, and cultural and linguistic factors in the planning, selection, development, and adaptation of learning experiences of learners with low incidence disabilities in inclusive environment.
  4. Employ culturally responsive strategies for creating effective family, school, community partnerships.
  5. Discuss culturally responsive strategies that promote collaboration between families, schools, and community agencies/organizations during the student’s transition planning process.
  6. Identify current educational issues impacting students with low incidence disabilities.

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SPED 5120. High Incidence Disabilities in a Diverse Society

3 Credits (3)

Examines those areas of disability that most frequently occur in the special education population, including intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, communication disorders, and behavioral and emotional disorders. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe and compare the major approaches to identifying, placement, assessing, planning for instruction, and classifying high incidence disabilities.
  2. Identify and discuss school-based, sociological, cultural, and economic differences as they relate to etiology and identification of mild disabilities.
  3. Describe and critically evaluate classroom instructional practices that can improve the educational success of students with high incidence disabilities.
  4. Describe and critically evaluate classroom management practices that can improve the educational success of students with high incidence disabilities.
  5. Describe how the educational experiences of persons with mild disabilities is shaped by their cognitive, perceptual, language, academic, and social / emotional characteristics.

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SPED 5130. Reading for Elementary Exceptional Learners in a Diverse Society, K-6

3 Credits (3)

Emphasizes reading diagnosis and materials for students with special developmental and learning problems. Taught with SPED 4130. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Evaluate the sources of reading difficulty
  2. Evaluate the characteristics exhibited by children with reading difficulties and reading disabilities.
  3. Demonstrate how to use non-biased, culturally responsive assessments and progress monitoring data to monitor and evaluate reading performance to drive instruction.
  4. Discuss the stages in literacy development and the factors that influence development of student literacy in reading, writing, speaking, viewing, and listening, including phonological, orthographic, semantic, and syntactic processing.
  5. Implement research-based reading strategies and instruction to promote the development of print awareness, phonological and phonemic awareness, fluency, vocabulary, spelling, comprehension, reading, and writing for learners with reading difficulties.
  6. Evaluate research-based strategies, methods, and commercial programs for different domains of reading.
  7. Create a lesson plan and teach an elementary level reading lesson.

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SPED 5140. Reading for Secondary Exceptional Learners in a Diverse Society, 7-12

3 Credits (3)

Extends information covered in SPED 5130, which covers grades K 6. Strategies and materials are addressed. Taught with SPED 4140. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate a knowledge of the major component of the reading process.
  2. Increase their repertoire of reading instruction procedures which may be used with students of differing reading abilities and from diverse backgrounds at the middle and secondary levels.
  3. Increase their knowledge of theory and related discipline-specific learning strategies designed to assist middle and secondary students in reading and learning through research based practices.
  4. Participate in discussion of current literacy issues.
  5. Explore the presentation of new teaching and learning strategies as they are related to content area literacy.

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SPED 5150. Curriculum, Methods, and Materials for Secondary Special Education

3 Credits (3)

Curriculum theory and development for elementary special education programs. Various teaching methods utilized with secondary exceptional learners and techniques for identifying, adapting, and developing materials will be addressed. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

SPED 5160. Technology and Exceptionality in a Diverse Society

3 Credits (3)

This class will address the unique educational needs of learners with exceptionalities, and will provide information and practice in addressing those needs through the use of technology-based interventions. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate familiarity in variety of assistive technology devices and services that are abailable for students with diverse range of disabilities
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of functional approaches to the assessment of assistive technology needs.
  3. Describe and implement inter disciplinary approaches to the assessment, selection and the use of technolgy to meet the educational and transitional demands of individuals with diverse range of disabilities.
  4. Identify and describe the function of the range of assistive technology devices and services in diverse settings.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the legal obligations of different entities in providing training and services that are relevant to assistive technologies.

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SPED 5210. Introduction to Assessment of Diverse Exceptional Learners

3 Credits (3)

Required for students seeking licensure at graduate level. Theory and use of norm-and criterion-referenced instruments and learning theories in the classroom; planning of prescriptive instructional programs with differentiated assignments for graduate students. Restricted to: SPED majors.

SPED 5220. Classroom Management for Diverse Learners

3 Credits (3)

Behavior-change strategies for exceptional learners. Taught with SPED 4220 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

SPED 5230. Advanced Curriculum for Diverse Exceptional Learners

3 Credits (3)

Strategies for developing curricula appropriate to handicapped and gifted learners. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Evaluate historical and current legislation pertaining to exceptional learners and their families and its impact on professional practice in the field.
  2. Describe the RTI process and its role in determining eligibility for special education services.
  3. Discuss learner diversity (ability, exceptionality, developmental level, learning style, language, gender, ethnicity, etc.) and employ individualized evidence-based culturally responsive instructional practices that build on learners’ strengths and interests.
  4. Create safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments to engage learners with exceptionalities in meaningful learning activities and social interactions that develop communication, emotional well-being, positive social interactions, and self-determination.
  5. Apply classroom management techniques that support learners and focus, on routines, procedures, rules, and positive behavior supports to address behavior.
  6. Apply culturally responsive instructional practices to individualize learning for learners with exceptionalities; taking into consideration individual abilities, interests, learning environments, and cultural and linguistic factors in the planning, selection, development, and adaptation of learning experiences for learners with exceptionalities.
  7. Design differentiated lesson plans that employ the tenets of universal design.

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SPED 5310. Introduction to Autism

3 Credits (3)

This course will provide an overview of autism spectrum disorders as a triad of impairments, including historical and theoretical perspectives, assessment issues, characteristics of autism, intervention programs, and family issues. Taught with SPED 4310 and SPED 6310. Differentiated Assignments. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Autism Spectrum Disorders ASD (characteristics, etiology, co-morbid conditions, differential diagnosis).
  2. Describe the criteria used to screen and diagnose ASD.
  3. Examine evidence-based practices used to effectively support students with ASD in accessing general education and grade level standards (classroom structure, differentiated instruction, peer mediated supports, structured teaching, and emotional supports).
  4. Describe strategies related to promoting a successful transition from school to adult life for individuals with ASD.
  5. Examine the strategies for effective collaboration and communication with families of children with ASD and key stakeholders for the purpose of information sharing and collaborative planning with families.
  6. Identify and investigate current educational issues impacting students with ASD.

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SPED 5320. Behavior and Autism

3 Credits (3)

This course will cover the first of the triad of impairments. Students will gain an understanding of the behaviors of children with autism. Students will examine several behavior management philosophies and research based interventions and how they can be applied in the educational setting. Attention will also be given to play skills. The family perspective and participation in the proactive behavior management process will be incorporated throughout the course. Taught with SPED 4320 and SPED 6320 with differentitated assignments. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 4310 or SPED 5310 or SPED 6310.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Explain the definition of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and associated characteristics of students with ASD as measured by required readings, discussions, and article reviews.
  2. Explain behavior impairments and characteristics associated with students with ASD as measured by required readings, discussions, and article reviews
  3. Explain Applied Behavior Analysis strategies as measured by completion of required paper(s) summarizing peer-reviewed journal article related to diversity, behavior management interventions, and/or behavior analysis.
  4. Explain information related to individuals with ASD and behavior challenges as measured by participation in online chat with instructor or group power point presentation.
  5. Discuss evidence-based treatment approaches that are useful in improving behavior management skills of students with ASD as measured by participation in required readings and discussions

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SPED 5330. Social Skills and Autism

3 Credits (3)

This course will cover the second of the triad of impairments. As a blend of researched based models and evidenced based practical applications, students will gain an understanding of the social skill deficits often associated with autism spectrum disorders. Review a variety of social cognition theories and explore effective social skill interventions for children functioning at a variety of levels along the autism spectrum. Taught with SPED 4330 and SPED 6330 with differentiated assignments. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 4310 or SPED 5310 or SPED 6310.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and explore the foundations of TESOL instruction.
  2. Analyze the sociocultural theory of teaching English as a second/foreign language.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of culturally responsive pedagogy in language teaching and academic achievement.
  4. Evaluate principles of best practices instruction and applications of TESOL methods.
  5. Explore assessment issues and concepts related to English Language Learners.
  6. Examine the impact of polices, national laws, school and community partnerships, and personal professional development on TESOL instruction.
  7. Develop, select, and implement second language teaching methods.

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SPED 5340. Communication and Autism

3 Credits (3)

This course will cover the third of the triad of impairments. Students will gain an overview of communication characteristics and difficulties often associated with autism spectrum disorders. Review current tools and strategies used to assess speech, language, and interaction skills. Use assessment results to identify needs and implement appropriate interventions. Explore a variety of intervention strategies aimed at building receptive, expressive, and pragmatic language of children functioning at a variety of levels along the autism spectrum. Taught with SPED 4340 and SPED 6340 with differentiated assignments. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 4310 or SPED 5310 or SPED 6310.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Autism Spectrum Disorders ASD (definition, characteristics, etiology).
  2. Evaluate communication characteristics and difficulties often associated with ASD.
  3. Appraise current tools and strategies used to assess communication problems in children with ASD.
  4. Analyze the types of interventions used to address the communication needs of children with ASD.
  5. Design an intervention plan to address the communication needs of a child with ASD.
  6. Employ data collection procedures to evaluate the effectiveness of research-based interventions for students with ASD.
  7. Incorporate family preferences and values into the educational process of students with ASD.

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SPED 5405. Foundations of Visual Impairment

3 Credits (3)

This course provides an overview of the history and theory of teaching students with visual impairments, including those with additional disabilities. The impact of educational, legislative, and societal trends on the psychosocial adjustment, quality of life, and post-school outcomes of individuals with visual impairments is explored. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Differentiate between the impact that visual impairment (both congenital and adventitious) has on a child’s/youth’s cognitive, language, communication, motor, social-emotional, and autonomous development.
  2. Predict the impact that familial, societal, cultural, and professional attitudes have on the self-esteem/self-identity of a child/youth who has a visual impairment and propose culturally responsive strategies to combat low self-esteem/lack of self-acceptance.
  3. Identify appropriate educational adaptations, including universal design for learning principles, for teaching students with visual impairments based on predominant sensory channel(s).
  4. Describe the prevalence and incidence of visual impairment, educational and legal classifications, service delivery options and regulations, and the roles of educational staff.
  5. Analyze how historical foundations shape current issues and trends in the education of students who are visually impaired.
  6. Locate sources of specialized materials, service networks, consumer/parent organizations, and professional associations and publications.

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SPED 5410. Functional Implications of Low Vision

3 Credits (3)

This course examines the structure and function of the visual system in relation to associated diseases and syndromes with an emphasis on measuring functional vision and determining appropriate educational adaptations. Consent of Instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 5405.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Use basic terminology to describe the structure and functions of the visual system and describe how the visual system typically develops.
  2. Identify the etiology and characteristics of the most common eye conditions and their impact on the development and education of individuals who have these conditions.
  3. Describe effects of medications on the visual system and on visual performance, Select, adapt, and use appropriate instruments for assessing functional vision, Follow legal, ethical, and technical procedures while conducting vision screenings or functional vision evaluations in order to determine educational services (including eligibility) and supports.
  4. Interpret the results of vision screenings, eye reports, and functional vision evaluations in ways that help students, families and other members of the educational team understand the impact the visual impairment has on learning, experience, and social-emotional well-being.
  5. Select individualized strategies for the enhancement of visual/sensory efficiency (including the use of environmental modifications, print material adaptations, optical aids, and non-optical aids) based on performance/assessment data

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SPED 5420. Strategies for Teaching Students with Visual and Multiple Impairments

3 Credits (3)

This course defines the roles and responsibilities of the teacher of students with visual impairments as part of the transdisciplinary team that serves students with visual impairments and additional disabilities. Emphasis is on assessment, curricula (both academic and functional), communication, behavior management, assistive technologies, inclusion, transition, and independent living. Consent of Instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 5410.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the impact that a concomitant visual impairment and additional disability has on a child’s/youth’s cognitive, language, communication, motor, social-emotional, autonomous, and sensory development.
  2. Recommend appropriate educational and environmental adaptations, including access technologies, for students with concomitant disabilities (including a visual impairment) related to the core curriculum (especially literacy) that are based on their unique needs, which transcend the effects of each individual disability.
  3. Recommend appropriate educational and environmental adaptations, including access technologies, for students with concomitant disabilities (including a visual impairment) related to the expanded core curriculum that are based on their unique needs, which transcend the effects of each individual disability.
  4. Choose specialized assessment tools appropriate for learners with visual impairments and additional disabilities.
  5. Summarize special considerations related to eligibility determination, educational placement, and service delivery models for students with visual impairments and additional disabilities.
  6. Describe special considerations related to effective collaboration with educators, related service providers, educational assistants, community agencies, and families of students with visual impairments and additional disabilities

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SPED 5430. Braille I: Literacy for Students with Visual Impairments

3 Credits (3)

This course facilitates an in depth study of the Uncontracted and Contracted Literary Braille codes as well as methods of teaching pre-braille, braille reading, and braille writing skills to tactual learners. Consent of Instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 5450.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Transcribe print content into Unified English Braille following appropriate formatting rules.
  2. Read, interline, and proof materials transcribed in Unified English Braille.
  3. Read, interline, and proof materials produced in English Braille American Edition.
  4. Transcribe, print content into a foreign language using the appropriate braille code.
  5. Read, interline, and proof materials produced in foreign language braille.
  6. Transcribe a simple score in music braille.
  7. Read and interline a simple score in music braille.
  8. Produce braille materials using various tools, including a Perkins Brailler, slate and stylus, and six-key keyboard entry.
  9. Delineate the ways that congenital and adventitious visual impairments impact literacy and the unique instructional strategies used with each of these groups. 1
  10. Identify pre-braille activities that develop essential tactual, motor, and reading readiness skills. 1
  11. Compare language arts and braille curricula/assessments for different types of tactual learners. 1
  12. Identify sources for obtaining braille resources, services and supports

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SPED 5440. Braille II: Numeracy for Students with Visual Impairments

3 Credits (3)

This course facilitates an indepth study of the Nemeth Braille Code for Mathematics and Science Notation as well as instructional strategies for using the abacus and developing numeracy. Specialized braile codes for computers, music, and foreign languages will be introduced. Consent of Instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 5430.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Transcribe mathematical and scientific notation into Nemeth Braille following appropriate rules.
  2. Read, and proof materials transcribed in Nemeth Braille
  3. Transcribe, print content into a foreign language using the appropriate braille code.
  4. Read, interline, and proof materials produced in foreign language braille.
  5. Transcribe a simple score in music braille.
  6. Read and interline a simple score in music braille.
  7. Produce braille materials, including tactile graphics, using various tools, including a Perkins Brailler, six-key keyboard entry, braille translation software, and tactile graphics.
  8. Create different task analysis on computational steps for solving problems with the Cranmer abacus using both the counting and indirect methods for beginning abacus users and aligning them to numeracy standards.
  9. Delineate the ways that visual impairment impacts literacy and numeracy and describe adapted instructional and assessment materials and resources that make math meaningfully accessible. 1
  10. Delineate the ways that visual impairment impacts scientific understandings and describe adapted instructional and assessment materials and resources that make science and social studies meaningfully accessible. 1
  11. Delineate the ways that visual impairment impacts understanding of health and sexuality and describe adapted instructional and assessment materials and resources that make health and sex education meaningfully accessible

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SPED 5450. Strategies for Teaching Students with Visual Impairments

3 Credits (3)

This course covers individualized educational programming in both the core and expanded core curriculums for children and youth with visual impairments with an emphasis on assessment, curricular adaptions, IFSP/IEP/ITP planning, and evidence-based practices. Restricted to: SPED majors. Consent of Instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 5410.

Learning Outcomes
  1. The learner will analyze core curriculum standards and benchmarks in order to determine necessary instruction in the expanded core curriculum so that learners with visual impairments can meaningfully participate in the common core curriculum.
  2. The learner will describe professional roles and ethical responsibilities of the teacher of students with visual impairments in relation to effective collaboration with all members of the educational team (particularly families, para educators, and general educators).
  3. The learner will select, adapt, and use appropriate assessments for determining effective and efficient primary and secondary learning modalities, literacy media, and access technologies needed for reading and writing.
  4. The learner will follow legal, ethical, and technical procedures while conducting learning media assessments and access technology evaluations, reporting findings, and making recommendations regarding necessary educational services and supports.
  5. The learner will demonstrate the procurement and use of different access technologies needed to make educational materials and learning activities accessible to learners with visual impairments

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SPED 5460. Introduction to Orientation and Mobility

3 Credits (3)

This course provides an overview of the history and theory of formalized orientation and mobility instruction as it relates to the ability to live independently. The impact of visual impairment and concomittant impairments on the development of spatial concepts and motor skills in relation to independent locomotion is emphasized. Topics covered include mobility aids; navigation, familiarization, and protective techniques; structured pre-cane assessment and instruction; the development and use of tactual maps; and the relationship of orientation and mobility to other areas of the expanded core curriculum. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to: SPED,EDUC majors. Consent of Instructor required. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 5420.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe components of orientation and mobility, the role of the certified orientation and mobility specialist, and the role of the teacher of students with visual impairments/developmental vision specialist in teaching travel skills to students who are blind and visually impaired, including those with additional disabilities.
  2. Describe significant historical events and legal provisions related to the formalized profession of orientation and mobility and how this affects the provision of orientation and mobility services.
  3. Identify the pros, cons, and prerequisite skills related to different modes of mobility and use of different mobility aids and transportation systems.
  4. Describe the impact of impaired vision on cognitive, motor, language, social, and self-help skills and effective interventions that promotes the development of independent locomotion and personal autonomy.
  5. Execute (and teach the execution of) basic orientation and mobility techniques under conditions that simulate various degrees of visual and additional impairments using all available sensory information (with and without optical aids) in a variety of environments.
  6. Task analyze and adapt activities of daily living to allow individuals with visual impairments to lead productive and healthy lifestyles.
  7. Identify sources of adapted products and specialized assessments related to the Expanded Core Curriculum that facilitate participation in home, work, and community activities for employment, self-care, and leisure

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SPED 5470. Beginning Orientation and Mobility

3 Credits (3)

This course provides an overview of the profession of orientation and mobility and how sensory, motor, and psychosocial function affects movement and spatial orientation. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to: SPED majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 5460.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe how perception and movement develops and is used to enhance safe and independent travel
  2. Describe how a traveler is able to acquire, maintain and improve orientation
  3. Describe the most common functional mobility problems for students with low vision and what a COMS should consider when providing OM instruction to students with low vision.
  4. Describe how development impacts movement and describe issues that impact gait and posture. Describe ways to support and improve sensorimotor development.
  5. Describe the psychosocial factors that impact behavior as one learns how to travel and describe ways to teach travelers to deal with
  6. Describe the fundamentals of hearing including principles of sound, audition, localization and traffic sounds. Describe ways to develop and improve orientation using hearing
  7. Describe the origins of the OM profession and its progression into the present, how OM services are provided around the world and the fundamentals of research in the profession.
  8. Evaluate and synthesize literature (publications, research literature) on a selected topic of their choice

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SPED 5480. Intermediate Orientation and Mobility

3 Credits (3)

This course focuses on strategies and methods for conducting assessments and appropriately sequencing skill acquisition for learners across the lifespan who may or may not have additional disabilities. Adaptive technology and other aids that assist with travel in a variety of environmental conditions using different mobility systems will also be covered. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to: SPED majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 5470.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Determine how to modify orientation and mobility instruction, depending on the age of the students, in the following ways: A) describe ways to teach OM to very young children; B) describe ways to teach OM to school age children; C) describe ways to teach OM to adults; and D) describe ways to teach OM to older adults.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of mobility systems and adaptations used by blind and visually impaired travelers in the following ways: A) describe how adaptive technology is used in travel; B) describe how dog guides are used in travel; C) describe orientation aids that can be used for students with vision loss; D) describe issues around environmental accessibility for student with vision loss; and E) describe how to teach OM in adverse weather conditions
  3. Demonstrate understanding of how to teach OM to students who have different disabilities in the following ways: A) describe ways to teach OM to learners with vision and hearing loss; B) describe ways to teach OM to learners with vision, physical and health impairments; C) describe ways to teach OM to learners with cognitive impairments and vision loss; D) describe ways to teach OM to learners with cortical visual impairments; and E) describe how to teach travel skills to learners with nonvisual disabilities
  4. Conduct an OM assessment and teach OM in the following ways: A) describe the components of a comprehensive OM assessment; B) describe creative ways to provide OM instruction; C) describe theories and best practices for teaching orientation and mobility; and D) describe ways to teach concepts creatively

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SPED 5490. Advanced Orientation and Mobility

3 Credits (3)

This course focuses on the development and monitoring of cane skills needed for safe and efficient travel in indoor, residential, and business districts, including the use of public transportation systems. Development, administration, and supervision of orientation and mobility services is also covered. Consent of Instructor required. Restricted to: SPED majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 5480.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Use orientation and mobility techniques to travel independently, safely and efficiently in a variety of environments including indoor, residential, small business and business areas while blindfolded or under low vision simulator.
  2. Provide appropriate and safe orientation and mobility instruction to fellow students, who are blindfolded or wearing low vision simulators, while traveling in indoor, residential, small business and business areas
  3. Describe modifications to traditional OM techniques for diverse learners of various ages with different degrees of visual functioning and with a variety of additional disabilities
  4. Use public transportation while blindfolded or under low vision simulatorand provide instruction to fellow students who are blindfolded or wearing low vision simulators in the use of public transportation
  5. Critically analyze one’s teaching and monitoring through self-observation and reflective practices

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SPED 5810. Student Teaching SPED

6 Credits (6)

Culminating course required for graduate level students seeking initial licensure. Students must have completed a Bachelor's degree and be admitted to student teaching program to enroll. Restricted to: SPED majors.

Prerequisite: SPED 5811.

Learning Outcomes
  1. The teacher candidate understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
  2. The teacher candidate uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
  3. The teacher candidate works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

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SPED 5811. Field Experience in Education, Equity & Cultural Diversity

3 Credits (3)

This is a supervised experience in providing special education services to local preK-12 students. In the context of the public school classroom, teacher candidates are guided to apply content knowledge from the seminar meetings and from prior coursework. This experience is designed for both the practicing general education classroom teacher pursuing special education licensure and for graduate teacher candidates pursuing initial special education licensure. Restricted to: SPED majors.

Prerequisite: SPED 3105 and SPED 3120, or SPED 5105 and SPED 5230, or consent of instructor.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Learners will demonstrate critical thinking skills and critical reflection and use current special education research to make and evaluate instructional decisions across the full range of learning tasks (including identifying appropriate learning objectives, selecting methods and materials, assessing student progress in relation to learning objectives, making classroom management decisions, and evaluating the results of decisions and implementation of lessons).
  2. Learners will create access to grade level general education curriculum for a broad range of students with diverse learning needs. This will be accomplished by using grade level standards and extended standards (as appropriate), following the requirements expressed in IEP’s, and designing and implementing appropriate instruction that addresses students’ needs, learning styles, motivation, and cultural and linguistic differences. Universal design, differentiation, accommodation, and modification will be used to address diverse learning needs.
  3. Learners will further develop, refine, and demonstrate the dispositions necessary to enter student teaching, with the ultimate goal of entering and advancing the teaching profession. This includes a) building rapport, positive communication, and a cooperative work environment with students, families, teachers, supervisors, instructors, educational/instructional assistants, service providers, and others in the school community b) demonstrating respectful and responsive attitudes toward individuals with exceptionalities from diverse backgrounds, as well as their families and service providers c) demonstrating responsible task performance d) adhering to the CEC code of ethics and university/site policies and procedures.
  4. Learners will select and use appropriate technology to support student learning.
  5. Learners will apply knowledge of the historical background and current laws and procedures within the field of special education to contextualize, explain, and evaluate special education services.

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SPED 5820. Masters Degree Seminar

3 Credits (3)

Capstone review of current issues in special education. Each student will participate in a practice comprehensive oral exam. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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SPED 5830. Special Education/Elementary Student Teaching Seminar

3 Credits (3)

Discussion of elementary Special Education school issues related to student teaching.

Prerequisite: SPED 5811.

Corequisite: SPED 5810.

Learning Outcomes
  1. The teacher candidate understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
  2. The teacher candidate uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
  3. The teacher candidate works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

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SPED 5840. Special Education/Secondary Student Teaching Seminar

3 Credits (3)

Discussion of secondary Special Education school issues related to student teaching.

Prerequisite: SPED 5811.

Corequisite: SPED 5810.

Learning Outcomes
  1. The teacher candidate understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
  2. The teacher candidate uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
  3. The teacher candidate works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

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SPED 5850. Current Research in Special Education

3 Credits (3)

Current investigations and research techniques. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Evaluate current research in special Education.
  2. Read and evaluate original research articles published in peer reviewed academic journals.
  3. Describe the elements of research.
  4. Analyze the designs, methods, and applications of quantitative research in special education
  5. Analyze the designs, methods, and applications of qualitative research in special education
  6. Examine ethical issues and guidelines for conducting special education research.
  7. Evaluate the elements of a research proposal.

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SPED 5860. Current Issues in Special Education for Teaching in Culturally Responsive Society

3 Credits (3)

Theoretical and empirical bases for special education practices. Skill development in critical thinking, reading, and writing in relation to contemporary problems. Taught with SPED 6860. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will learn several concepts, issues, and theories in contemporary special education in order to be a more intelligent consumer of information about special education.
  2. Students will analyze, evaluate, and make decisions concerning complex contemporary issues in special education.
  3. Students will demonstrate communications skills, both written and oral, in order to enhance their effectiveness in expressing their view on the issues related to special education.
  4. Students will examine issues related to the human experience as it relates to diversity and a culturally and linguistically diverse world.
  5. Students will debate the pros and cons of current special education issues

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SPED 5870. Early Childhood SPED Student Teaching

6 Credits (6)

A student teaching experience designed for students studying early childhood special education. Restricted to TEP-ECED majors. Students must be admitted to student teaching to enroll. May be repeated up to 9 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Our mission is to serve the people of New Mexico through education, research, extension education, and public service with specific emphasis on innovative practices, overcoming barriers to learning, international activities, technology, and literacy for the diverse populations of New Mexico, surrounding states and border communities.

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SPED 5990. Practicum in Reading Disabilities

3 Credits (3)

Supervised experience in assessing a student with reading disability, developing and intervention plan, and implementing and monitoring the interventions across time. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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SPED 5991. Special Research Problems

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Individual investigation either analytical or experimental. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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SPED 5996. Topics in Special Education

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Offered under various subtitles which indicate the subject matter to be covered. Maximum of 6 credits, 3 credits per semester. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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SPED 5999. Master's Thesis

1-15 Credits (1-15)

Thesis. May be repeated up to 88 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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SPED 6110. Low Incidence Disabilities

3 Credits (3)

Examines those disabilities that occur less frequently in the special education population, including hearing loss, visual disorders, autism, and other severe manifestations. Taught with SPED 5110 with differentiated assignments. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Low Incidence Disabilities (characteristics, etiology, and diagnostic criteria) (IDEIA, 2004).
  2. Identify the types of related supports and services—assistive technology, environmental and Instructional accommodations/modifications, and related services—available to students with low incidence disabilities to maximize participation in inclusive settings.
  3. Apply culturally responsive instructional practices to individualize learning for learners with low incidence disabilities, taking into consideration individual abilities, interests, learning environments, and cultural and linguistic factors in the planning, selection, development, and adaptation of learning experiences of learners with low incidence disabilities in inclusive environment.
  4. Employ culturally responsive strategies for creating effective family, school, community partnerships.
  5. Discuss culturally responsive strategies that promote collaboration between families, schools, and community agencies/organizations during the student’s transition planning process.
  6. Identify current educational issues impacting students with low incidence disabilities.

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SPED 6120. High Incidence Disabilities in a Diverse Society

3 Credits (3)

Examines those areas of disability that most frequently occur in the special education population, including mental retardation, learning disabilities, communication disorders, and behavioral and emotional disorders. Taught with SPED 5120. Master's Degree. Restricted to SPED and C D majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe and compare the major approaches to identifying, placement, assessing, planning for instruction, and classifying high incidence disabilities.
  2. Identify and discuss school-based, sociological, cultural, and economic differences as they relate to etiology and identification of mild disabilities.
  3. Describe and critically evaluate classroom instructional practices that can improve the educational success of students with high incidence disabilities.
  4. Describe and critically evaluate classroom management practices that can improve the educational success of students with high incidence disabilities.
  5. Describe how the educational experiences of persons with mild disabilities is shaped by their cognitive, perceptual, language, academic, and social / emotional characteristics.

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SPED 6160. Technology and Exceptionality in a Diverse Society

3 Credits (3)

This class will address the unique educational needs of learners with exceptionalities, and will provide information and practice in addressing those needs through the use of technology-based interventions. Taught with SPED 5160.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Carry out effective practicum practices for using technology with diverse learners.

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SPED 6170. School Intervention and Organization in a Diverse Society

3 Credits (3)

Introduces public school organization and laws and the psycho-sociological perspective of education. Curriculum and theory, teaching methods and materials will be presented and operationalized through a psycho-educational point of view. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and implement effective interventions in a variety of classroom and organizational settings.

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SPED 6310. Introduction to Autism

3 Credits (3)

This course will provide an overview of autism spectrum disorders as a triad of impairments, including historical and theoretical perspectives, assessment issues, characteristics of autism, intervention programs, and family issues. Differentiated Assignments.Taught with SPED 5310 and SPED 4310. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Autism Spectrum Disorders ASD (characteristics, etiology, co-morbid conditions, differential diagnosis).
  2. Describe the criteria used to screen and diagnose ASD.
  3. Examine evidence-based practices used to effectively support students with ASD in accessing general education and grade level standards (classroom structure, differentiated instruction, peer mediated supports, structured teaching, and emotional supports).
  4. Describe strategies related to promoting a successful transition from school to adult life for individuals with ASD.
  5. Examine the strategies for effective collaboration and communication with families of children with ASD and key stakeholders for the purpose of information sharing and collaborative planning with families.
  6. Identify and investigate current educational issues impacting students with ASD.

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SPED 6330. Social Skills and Autism

3 Credits (3)

This course will cover the second of the triad of impairments. As a blend of researched based models and evidenced based practical applications, students will gain an understanding of the social skill deficits often associated with autism spectrum disorders. Review a variety of social cognition theories and explore effective social skill interventions for children functioning at a variety of levels along the autism spectrum. Taught with SPED 4330 and SPED 5330 with differentiated assignments. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: SPED 4310 or SPED 5310 or SPED 6310.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Autism Spectrum Disorders ASD (definition, characteristics, etiology).
  2. Evaluate Social Skills characteristics and difficulties often associated with ASD.
  3. Appraise current tools and strategies used to assess Social Skills problems in children with ASD.
  4. Use assessment results to identify the Social Skills needs of children with ASD
  5. Analyze the types of evidence-based practices used to address the Social Skills needs of children with ASD.
  6. Design an intervention plan to address the Social Skills needs of a child with ASD.
  7. Incorporate family preferences and values into the educational process of students with ASD.
  8. Employ data collection procedures to evaluate the effectiveness of evidence-based practices for students with ASD.

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SPED 6340. Communication and Autism

3 Credits (3)

This course will cover the third of the triad of impairments. Students will gain an overview of communication characteristics and difficulties often associated with autism spectrum disorders. Review current tools and strategies used to assess speech, language, and interaction skills. Use assessment results to identify needs and implement appropriate interventions. Explore a variety of intervention strategies aimed at building receptive, expressive, and pragmatic language of children functioning at a variety of levels along the autism spectrum. Taught with SPED 4340 and SPED 5340 and differentiated assignments. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite: SPED 4310 or SPED 5310 or SPED 6310.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Autism Spectrum Disorders ASD (definition, characteristics, etiology).
  2. Evaluate communication characteristics and difficulties often associated with ASD.
  3. Appraise current tools and strategies used to assess communication problems in children with ASD.
  4. Analyze the types of interventions used to address the communication needs of children with ASD.
  5. Design an intervention plan to address the communication needs of a child with ASD.
  6. Employ data collection procedures to evaluate the effectiveness of research-based interventions for students with ASD.
  7. Incorporate family preferences and values into the educational process of students with ASD.

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SPED 6810. Doctoral Seminar

1-4 Credits (1-4)

The seminar will engage doctoral students in scholarly dialogue and production. It will assist in preparing them for future careers in leadership roles. May be repeated up to 4 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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SPED 6830. Current Research in Special Education

3 Credits (3)

Required for students seeking the Ed.D./Ph.D. M.A. degree. Restricted to majors. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Evaluate current research in special Education.
  2. Read and evaluate original research articles published in peer reviewed academic journals.
  3. Describe the elements of research.
  4. Analyze the designs, methods, and applications of quantitative research in special education
  5. Analyze the designs, methods, and applications of qualitative research in special education
  6. Examine ethical issues and guidelines for conducting special education research.
  7. Evaluate the elements of a research proposal.

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SPED 6840. Current Issues in Special Education for Teaching in a Culturally Responsive Society

3 Credits (3)

Required for students seeking the Ed.D./Ph.D. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

SPED 6991. Doctoral Research

1-15 Credits (1-15)

Research. May be repeated up to 88 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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SPED 6996. Selected Topics in Special Education

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Offered under various subtitles which indicate the subject matter to be covered. Maximum of 6 credits, 3 credits per semester. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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SPED 6997. Independent Study Topics in Special Education

1-6 Credits (1-6)

A problem and seminar course for those pursuing an advanced graduate degree. Each course to bear an appropriate subtitle. May be repeated up to 99 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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SPED 6998. Internship in Special Education

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Each course bears a qualifying subtitle. Maximum of 6 credits per semester. May be repeated up to 99 credits.

SPED 7000. Dissertation

1-9 Credits (1-9)

Credit may be earned by students who have successfully completed their doctoral comprehensive exams and presented their dissertation proposals to their committees. At least 18 credits are required during the course of dissertation study. May be repeated up to 24 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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Name: School of Teacher Preparation, Administration and Leadership (TPAL)

Office Location: O'Donnell Hall, Suite 302

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 30001, MSC 3TPAL, Las Cruces, NM 88003

Physical Mailing Address: 1220 Stewart Street; O'Donnell Hall Rm 302, Las Cruces, NM 88003

Phone: (575) 646-3825 / 646-4820

Email: schooloftpal@nmsu.edu

Website: http://tpal.nmsu.edu