Chemistry and Biochemistry

Undergraduate Program Information

A degree in chemistry or biochemistry enables a student to pursue a wide variety of careers in: research, production, sales, management and teaching. These degrees are also an excellent preparation for professional studies in medicine, dentistry, forensics, veterinary science, optometry, pharmacology, pharmacy and law.

Chemistry majors who have completed the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree may receive American Chemical Society certification if they take one additional one-semester course which includes 1 credit of laboratory.

Students who complete a Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry and wish to complete the Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry must complete 3 additional upper division chemistry credits that are not counted in the Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry.

All departmental and nondepartmental requirements may not be taken S/U and must earn a C- or better final grade.

This department does not have a foreign language requirement for any of its degrees.

Graduate Program Information

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers programs leading to the MS and Ph.D. degrees in Chemistry in the areas of physical, organic, inorganic, biological, and analytical chemistry. Admission to these programs without deficiency is based on an undergraduate program essentially equivalent to that pursued by a chemistry or biochemistry major at this university. All applying students must submit GRE scores, undergraduate transcripts, a personal statement and CV, and arrange for 3 letters of recommendation. All foreign students from undergraduate programs taught in a language other than English must additionally submit TOEFL or IELTS scores and demonstrate adequate English speaking and writing skills.

The core course work required of students entering with no previous graduate study in chemistry or biochemistry consists of courses exploring the concepts of Energy, Structure, Dynamics, and Measurements as applied to all disciplines of chemistry and biochemistry as well as short courses in Safety, Research Ethics, and Professional Development. Successful completion of a Qualifying Exam taken after the first year of coursework will determine whether a student is qualified to pursue continued study at the M.S. or Ph.D. level. After completion of the qualifying exam, a thesis committee is formed to assist the student in planning a program appropriate to his or her background and goals. Ph.D. candidates must take at least 6 additional credits of specialized coursework chosen in consultation with the thesis committee while M.S. candidates must take at least 3 additional credits. Ph.D. candidates must successfully complete a Comprehensive Exam in order to be eligible to write and defend a Ph.D. thesis. All students are expected to participate in discussion groups and department colloquia.

Since research is central in both the M.S. and Ph.D. programs, the early selection of a research advisor is encouraged. Students may choose to rotate through up to 3 research labs during their first semester before selecting a research advisor. Financial support is provided to all graduate students during their first year through teaching assistantships. Continued support may be provided through a research or teaching assistantship, depending upon individual laboratory funding. All support is contingent upon satisfactory academic and research performance. In addition, numerous traineeships and fellowships are available to qualified students. Inquiries regarding these opportunities should be directed to the graduate program coordinator.

Shelley Lusetti, Department Head

Professors Arterburn, Herndon, Lyons, Johnson, Rayson, Smirnov; Associate Professors Houston, Lara, Lusetti, Maio, Yukl; Assistant Professors Ashley, Mera, Talipov; College Professors Chinnasamy, Dunlavy, Potenza; Emeritus Professor Eiceman, Gopalan, Kuehn, Quintana

S. Lusetti, Department Head, Ph.D. (Wisconsin–Madison)– biochemistry; enzymology of DNA repair; J. B. Arterburn, Ph.D. (Arizona)– organic chemistry; synthetic medicinal and chemical biology; A. K. Ashley, Ph.D. (Colorado State University)– biochemistry and toxicology; DNA replication and repair, cancer; J. W. Herndon, Ph.D. (Princeton)– organic chemistry; organo-transition metal complexes, synthesis of biologically important cyclic compounds; K. D. Houston, Ph.D. (University of Texas- MD Anderson)– biochemistry; molecular mechanisms of hormone action in tumorigenesis; M. D. Johnson, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University)– inorganic chemistry; kinetics, reaction mechanisms of transition metal complexes; A. S. Lara, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University)– analytical chemistry; exploitation of clays for remediation of environmental pollutants; B. A. Lyons, Ph.D. (Cornell University)– physical biochemistry; NMR spectroscopic studies of signal transduction pathways in breast cancer; W. A. Maio, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins University)– organic chemistry; total synthesis of marine natural products and explorations of new chemical methods; P. E. Mera, Ph.D. (Wisconsin–Madison)– biochemistry and microbiology; cell-division cycle of bacteria, DNA replication; G. D. Rayson, Ph.D. (Texas-Austin)– analytical chemistry, spectroscopy; S. N. Smirnov, Ph.D. (Novosibirsk State University)– physical chemistry; photo-induced charge separation; M. R. Talipov, Ph.D. (Bashkir State University)– Theoretical Physical Chemistry; electronic structure calculations, ab initio calculations, density functional theory calculations; E. T. Yukl, Ph.D. (Oregon Health and Science University)– biochemistry; x-ray crystallography and spectroscopy of bacterial metalloproteins

Biochemistry Courses

BCHE 140. Introduction to Biochemistry

1 Credit (1)

A description of the nature of inquiry in biochemistry, especially with respect to the interaction of chemistry and biology. Both historical development and topics of current interest will be discussed. Graded S/U.

BCHE 241. Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

1-3 Credits

Techniques and procedures of biochemical research. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

Prerequisites: 8 credits of chemistry and 3.0 GPA in chemistry.

BCHE 341. Survey of Biochemistry

4 Credits (3+3P)

Basic principles of biochemical processes and the structure/function of the major classes of biomolecules, with introductions to metabolism and the central dogma of biochemistry. The chemical and biological properties of major biomolecules (DNA, proteins, May be repeated up to 4 credits.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in CHEM 2115 or CHEM 314.

BCHE 395. Biochemistry I

3 Credits (3)

Principles governing chemistry and physics of life processes with emphasis on the relationships between molecular structure and cell function. Basic principles of biochemical processes, enzymology, and the structure/function of the major classes of biomolecules with introductions to metabolism. Introduction to catabolic metabolism.

Prerequisite(s): C or better in CHEM 314.

BCHE 396. Biochemistry II

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to anabolic metabolism and hormonal regulation. Biochemical principles of the mechanism and regulation of replication, transcription, recombination and translation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Introduction to DNA-based information technology. Taught with BCHE 396 H.

Prerequisite(s): C or better in BCHE 395.

BCHE 396 H. Biochemistry II Honors

3 Credits (3)

Taught with BCHE 396 with additional work required.

BCHE 424. Experimental Biochemistry I

3 Credits (1.25+6P)

Laboratory techniques required for experimentation with recombinant DNA such as nucleic acid isolation and purification, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequence analysis, and directed mutagenesis using genetic material from both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in BCHE 395, and BCHE 396 or GENE 315.

BCHE 425. Experimental Biochemistry II

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to fundamental techniques used to explore structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acid. Course covers analyzing and reporting experimental data; enzymology; quantitative methods to determine biological molecules; basic principles of electrophoresis, chromatography, and spectroscopic immunochemistry. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in BCHE 424.

BCHE 432. Physical Biochemistry

3 Credits (3)

This course focuses on modern Biophysical techniques used in protein and nucleic acid research. Topics are covered in some detail at the theoretical level. The course content is delivered entirely by podcast. Podcast contributions are from several different faculty from within their particular area(s) of expertise. Topics covered include (but are not limited to): biomolecular NMR, atomic force microscopy, light scattering, circular dichroism, ultracentrifugation, isothermal titration calorimetry, positron emission tomography, computerized tomography, ultrasound, functional MRI, protein fluorescence, mass spec/ proteomics, protein molecular dynamics simulations, and X-ray diffraction. Course credit qualifies for minor degree in chemistry as a physical-analytical chemistry emphasis. CHEM 431, or CHEM 433.

Prerequisite(s): One semester of undergraduate physical chemistry, e.g.

BCHE 440. Biochemistry Seminar

1 Credit (1)

Introduction to current literature in biochemistry and molecular biology. Selected topics in the field will be presented by the faculty. Students will present written and oral reports from literature searches. Restricted to: BCHE majors.

Prerequisite(s): BCHE 395.

BCHE 441. Advanced Research in Biochemistry

1-3 Credits

Investigation of biochemical problems and the development of special techniques. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

Prerequisites: consent of instructor, 16 credits of chemistry and 3.0 GPA in chemistry for nonmajors.

BCHE 446. Biochemistry III

3 Credits (3)

Intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleic acids. Metabolic pathways discussed with emphasis on biochemical regulation and mechanistic, structural, functional, and evolutionary basis for existence.

Prerequisite(s): BCHE 395 and either BCHE 396 or consent of instructor.

BCHE 451. Special Topics

1-3 Credits

Same as CHEM 451. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

BCHE 455. Independent Studies

1-3 Credits

Independent studies directed by consulting faculty.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

BCHE 540. Seminar in Biochemistry

1 Credit (1)

Formal seminar presentation in current topics in biochemical research. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

BCHE 542. Biochemistry I

3 Credits (3)

Relationship between macromolecular structure and function. Basic enzymology. Energy metabolism.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 314 and CHEM 431 or CHEM 433; or BCHE 395 or equivalent.

BCHE 545. Molecular and Biochemical Genetics

3 Credits (3)

An accelerated treatment of the molecular basis of gene expression. Discussion of chemical, enzymological, and genetic techniques of molecular biology. Same as BIOL 545.

Prerequisite: BCHE 542 or equivalent.

BCHE 546. Biochemistry II

3 Credits (3)

Intermediary metabolism: catabolic and anabolic pathways of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleic acids, including their regulation.

Prerequisite: BCHE 542 or BCHE 395 with consent of instructor.

BCHE 590. Discussions in Biochemistry

1 Credit (1)

Current research problems in biochemistry. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Graded: S/U Grading (S/U, Audit).

BCHE 598. Special Research Programs

1-3 Credits

May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Same as CHEM 598. Graded S/U.

BCHE 599. Master's Thesis

15 Credits

May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Same as CHEM 599.

BCHE 600. Research

1-15 Credits

May be repeated for a maximum of 20 credits. PR/U grading. Same as CHEM 600.

BCHE 647. Physical Biochemistry

3 Credits (3)

Fundamental applications of physical chemistry to the investigation of biological metabolites and biological macromolecules, including proteins, oligo-nucleotides, and molecular arrays with an emphasis on understanding biological functions based on chemical structures. Taught with BCHE 451.

Prerequisite(s): 'C' or better in CHEM 431 or CHEM 433 or BCHE 542.

BCHE 649. Topics in Biochemistry

1-3 Credits

Selected topics of current interest designated by title and credit. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

BCHE 650. Advanced Seminar

1 Credit (1)

Discussion of biochemical research in progress that relates to a doctoral candidate's thesis research. Intended for students who have earned a master's degree or the equivalent and has made significant research progress for preparation of the doctoral dissertation. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

BCHE 700. Doctoral Dissertation

20 Credits

May be repeated for a maximum of 20 credits. Graded PR/U. Same as CHEM 700.

Chemistry Courses

CHEM 1111. Basic Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

For students whose preparatory science or math training has been deficient. Does not meet the chemistry requirement in any curriculum.

Prerequisite: Enhanced ACT composite score of at least 18 or a grade of C- or better in CCDM 114 N.

CHEM 1120G. Introduction to Chemistry Lecture and Laboratory (non majors)

4 Credits (3+3P)

This course covers qualitative and quantitative areas of non-organic general chemistry for non-science majors and some health professions. Students will learn and apply principles pertaining, but not limited to, atomic and molecular structure, the periodic table, acids and bases, mass relationships, and solutions. The laboratory component introduces students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment.

Prerequisite: CCDM 114N or A S 103 or MATH 1215 or higher.

CHEM 1121. General Supplemental Instruction I

1 Credit (1)

Collaborative workshop for students in General Chemistry I. Course does not count toward departmental degree requirements. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits.

Corequisite(s): CHEM 1215G.

CHEM 1122. General Supplemental Instruction II

1 Credit (1)

Collaborative workshop for students in General Chemistry II. Course does not count toward departmental degree requirements. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits.

Corequisite(s): CHEM 1225G.

CHEM 1123. Principles of Supplemental Instruction III

1 Credit (1)

Collaborative workshop for students in CHEM 1120G, Principles and Applications of Chemistry. Course does not count toward departmental degree requirements. May be repeated for maximum of 2 credits.

Corequisite(s): CHEM 1120G.

CHEM 1215G. General Chemistry I Lecture and Laboratory for STEM Majors

4 Credits (3+3P)

This course covers descriptive and theoretical chemistry.

Prerequisite: (1) grade of C- or better in MATH 1215 or higher, or a Mathematics Placement Exam Score adequate to enroll in mathematics courses beyond MATH 1215.

CHEM 1216. General Chemistry I Lecture and Laboratory for CHEM Majors

4 Credits (3+3P)

As the first of a two-semester sequence, this course teaches fundamental concepts in chemistry, including the electronic structure of atoms, chemical periodicity, nature of chemical bonds, molecular structure, the three phases of matter, etc. Designed for majors in chemical and other physical sciences, including engineering. May be appropriate for the life science major. It is assumed that the students are familiar with college algebra, chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, and scientific measurements. The laboratory component is designed to complement the theory and concepts presented in lecture, and will introduce students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment.

Prerequisite(s): Eligible to take MATH 1250G and an ACT composite score of 22 or higher.

CHEM 1225G. General Chemistry II Lecture and Laboratory for STEM Majors

4 Credits (3+3P)

This course is intended to serve as a continuation of general chemistry principles for students enrolled in science, engineering, and certain preprofessional programs. The course includes, but is not limited to a theoretical and quantitative coverage of solutions and their properties, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, entropy and free energy, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Additional topics may include (as time permits) organic, polymer, atmospheric, and biochemistry. The laboratory component is designed to complement the theory and concepts presented in lecture, and will introduce students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in CHEM 1215G.

CHEM 1226. General Chemistry II Lecture and Laboratory for CHEM Majors

4 Credits (3+3P)

As the second of a two-semester sequence, this course teaches fundamental concepts in chemistry, including solutions, equilibria, electrochemistry, thermodynamics and kinetics. Designed for majors in chemical and other physical sciences, including engineering. May be appropriate for the life science major. It is assumed that the students are familiar with college algebra, chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, and scientific measurements. The laboratory component is designed to complement the theory and concepts presented in lecture, and will introduce students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in CHEM 1216.

CHEM 2111. Explorations in Chemistry

1 Credit (1)

The major intent of this course is to deepen your interest in chemistry and make you aware of research and career opportunities in the field. During this semester we hope to discuss both old and new developments in chemistry that impact our lives. We also want to build our communication skills that are so necessary in our profession. Graded S/U.

CHEM 2115. Survey of Organic Chemistry and Laboratory

4 Credits (3+3P)

This course is a one -semester survey of organic and biological chemicals. Students will be introduced to nomenclature, molecular structure, properties, and reactions of hydrocarbons, alcohols, carbonyls, organic acids and bases, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. The handling of organic chemicals, simple organic reactions, tests for functional groups, and synthesis will be learned in the laboratory component of this course. May be repeated up to 4 credits.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1225G.

CHEM 2120. Integrated Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry

3 Credits (3)

This course is a one- semester introduction to Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry designed for students in health and environmental occupations. The course surveys organic compounds in terms of structure, physical, and chemical properties, followed by coverage of the chemistry of specific classes of organic compounds in the biological environment. Students will apply course concepts to everyday organic and biological chemistry problems in preparation for careers in health and environmental fields.

Prerequisite: CHEM 1120G or CHEM 1215G.

CHEM 2226. General Chemistry III

3 Credits (2+3P)

Quantitative aspects of general chemistry: solid state structure, equilibrium, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Required of chemical science majors who have taken CHEM 1215G/1225G.

Prerequisite: CHEM 1225G.

CHEM 2991. Introduction to Research

1-3 Credits (3+9P)

Techniques and procedures of chemical research. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

Prerequisites: 8 credits of chemistry and a 3.0 GPA in chemistry.

CHEM 2996. Special Topics in Chemistry

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Specific subjects in Chemistry. These subjects will be announced in the 'Schedule of Classes'. It may be repeated under different topics for a maximum of 12 credits.

CHEM 303. Organic Supplemental Instruction I

1 Credit (1)

Collaborative workshop for students in Organic Chemistry I. Course does not count toward departmental degree requirements. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits.

Corequisite(s): CHEM 313.

CHEM 304. Organic Supplemental Instruction II

1 Credit (1)

Collaborative workshop for students in Organic Chemistry II. Course does not count toward departmental degree requirements. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits.

Corequisite(s): CHEM 314.

CHEM 313. Organic Chemistry I

3 Credits (3)

Nomenclature, uses, basic reactions, and preparation methods of the most important classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in CHEM 1225G or CHEM 1226.

CHEM 314. Organic Chemistry II

3 Credits (3)

An in-depth focus on reactions and mechanisms as they relate to organometallic compounds, alcohols, ethers, ketones, aldehydes, carboxylic acid derivatives, an amines. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in CHEM 313.

CHEM 315. Organic Chemistry Laboratory

2 Credits (6P)

Techniques, preparative and analytical methods in organic chemistry. May be repeated up to 2 credits.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): CHEM 314. Prerequisite(s): C- or better in CHEM 313 or consent of instructor.

CHEM 351. Special Topics

1-3 Credits

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CHEM 356. Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Occurrence and properties of the elements and the chemistry of their compounds.

Prerequisite(s): (CHEM 1225G or CHEM 1226) and (CHEM 2115 or CHEM 313).

CHEM 357. Synthetic Inorganic Laboratory

2 Credits (6P)

Explores synthesis and analysis of main group and transition metal inorganic compounds. Inorganic laboratory and spectroscopic techniques will be used.

Prerequisites: CHEM 356.

CHEM 371. Analytical Chemistry

4 Credits (2+6P)

The fundamentals of quantitative chemical analysis.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in CHEM 1225G or CHEM 1226.

CHEM 422. Environmental Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Chemistry of organic and metal ion pollutants in the environment and principles important to their remediation including bioremediation. Restricted to: Main campus only. Crosslisted with: ENVS 422

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1225G and either CHEM 2115 or CHEM 313.

CHEM 424. Soil Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Same as SOIL/GEOL 424.

CHEM 431. Physical Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Principles that govern the physical and chemical behavior of matter. May not be counted toward Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1226 or CHEM 2226; MATH 1521G; PHYS 1240G or PHYS 2240G or PHYS 2140 or PHYS 1320G.

CHEM 431 H. Physical Chemistry Honors

3 Credits (3)

Same as CHEM 431. Additional work to be arranged.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1226 or CHEM 2226; MATH 1521G or MATH 1521H; PHYS 1240G or PHYS 2240G or PHYS 2140 or PHYS 1320G.

CHEM 433. Physical Chemistry I

3 Credits (3)

Laws and theories underlying chemical phenomena.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1226 or CHEM 2226; MATH 1521G; PHYS 2140 or PHYS 1320G, or consent of instructor.

CHEM 433 H. Physical Chemistry I Honors

3 Credits (3)

Same as CHEM 433. Additional work to be arranged.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1226 or CHEM 2226; MATH 1521G or MATH 1521H; PHYS 2140 or PHYS 1320G, or consent of instructor.

CHEM 434. Physical Chemistry II

3 Credits (3)

Laws and theories underlying chemical phenomena.

Prerequisite: CHME 302 or CHEM 433.

CHEM 435. Physical Chemistry Laboratory

2 Credits (6P)

Prerequisite: concurrent registration in CHEM 434.

CHEM 441. Advanced Research

1-3 Credits (3+9P)

Investigation of chemical problems and the development of special techniques. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

Prerequisites: consent of instructor, 16 credits of chemistry and 3.0 GPA in chemistry for nonmajors.

CHEM 443. Senior Seminar

1 Credit (1)

Discussions of current chemical research, impact of chemistry on society and/or ethics as applied to chemists. Each student will present a written and an oral report on an approved topic.

Prerequisite: CHEM 431 or CHEM 433.

CHEM 451. Special Topics

1-3 Credits

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CHEM 455. Independent Studies

1-3 Credits

Independent studies directed by consulting faculty.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CHEM 456. Inorganic Structure and Bonding

3 Credits (3)

Theoretical principles and a systematic study of the periodic table.

Prerequisite: CHEM 356 or CHEM 431 or CHEM 433.

CHEM 466. Advanced Organic Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Recent developments in synthesis and theoretical principles of organic chemistry.

Prerequisite: CHEM 314.

CHEM 471. Instrumental Methods of Analysis

4 Credits (3+3P)

Analytical techniques, including optical and procedures.

Prerequisites: CHEM 371 and either PHYS 1240G or PHYS 1320G.

CHEM 475. Central Concepts in Chemistry - Safety

1 Credit (1)

Students will obtain university safety training plus departmental-specific safety guidelines for the research laboratory

CHEM 476. Central Concepts in Chemistry - Research Ethics

1 Credit (1)

Students will complete Federal Agency (NSF, NIH, etc.) on-line training modules in responsible conduct in research and discuss relevant case-studies of research misconduct.

CHEM 477. Central Concepts in Chemistry - ProfessionalDevelopment

1 Credit (1)

Students will receive basic instruction in research dissemination strategies (presentations) and career planning.

CHEM 501. Central Concepts in Chemistry - Energy

3 Credits (3)

This course will provide the students with a detailed examination of several topics in chemical energetics. These topics include: (1) basic thermodynamics concepts, (2) statistical thermodynamics (3) chemical equilibria, and (4) intermolecular interactions.

CHEM 502. Central Concepts in Chemistry - Structure

3 Credits (3)

This course will provide the students with a detailed examination of several topics in chemical reactivity. These topics include: (1) principles of chemical bonding and (2) organic, inorganic and biochemical structure determination.

CHEM 503. Central Concepts in Chemistry - Dynamics

3 Credits (3)

This course will provide the students with a detailed examination of several topics in chemical reactivity. These topics include: (1) basic kinetic concepts, (2) fundamental gas phase kinetics (3) organic, inorganic and biochemical reaction mechanisms.

CHEM 504. Central Concepts in Chemistry - Measurements

3 Credits (3)

This course will provide the students with a detailed examination of several topics in chemical measurements. These topics include: (1) spectroscopic, electrochemical and chromatographic techniques, (2) statistical methods of measurement and validation relevant to biomolecules, synthetic polymers and mixtures.

CHEM 507. Chemistry of the Elements

3 Credits (3)

Discussion of the reactions and structures of inorganic compounds.

CHEM 510. Seminar in Organic Chemistry

1 Credit (1)

Current topics. May be repeated.

CHEM 514. Organic Structure Determination

3 Credits (3)

Modern spectroscopic techniques for characterization of organic compounds.

CHEM 515. Modern Organic Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Recent developments in synthesis and theoretical principles of organic chemistry.

CHEM 516. Physical Organic Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Physical organic chemistry.

CHEM 517. Synthetic Organic Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Synthetic methods in organic chemistry.

CHEM 520. Seminar in Analytical Chemistry

1 Credit (1)

Current topics. May be repeated.

CHEM 521. Chemical Instrumentation

3 Credits (2+3P)

Theory and application of electronic devices to chemical analysis.

CHEM 526. Advanced Analytical Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Equilibria, and the theories of gravimetric, volumetric, and instrumental analysis.

CHEM 527. Separations

3 Credits (3)

Covers the fundamentals of separation methods and relationships to modern analytical techniques such as gas chromatography and liquid chromatography.

CHEM 528. Electroanalytical Techniques

3 Credits (3)

Theory and application of modern electrochemical methods of analysis including voltammetry, amperometry, modern cyclic and pulse methods, and stripping analysis.

CHEM 529. Spectrochemical Analysis

3 Credits (3)

Fundamentals, instrumentation, and applications of spectrochemical analysis.

CHEM 530. Seminar in Physical Chemistry

1 Credit (1)

Current topics. May be repeated.

CHEM 536. Chemical Thermodynamics

3 Credits (3)

First, second, and third laws of thermodynamics, and the concepts, interrelations, and applications of thermodynamic state functions.

CHEM 537. Quantum Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Fundamentals of quantum mechanics.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CHEM 538. Chemical Kinetics

3 Credits (3)

Empirical analysis of rate measurements, collision theory, transition state theory, and chain reactions.

CHEM 539. Spectroscopy

3 Credits (3)

Molecular spectroscopy for physical chemistry. Quantum mechanics applied to spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules: UV-VIs, IR, magnetic resonance. CHEM 537 desired but not required. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CHEM 560. Discussions in Organic Chemistry

1 Credit (1)

Current research problems in organic chemistry. May be repeated. Graded S/U.

CHEM 570. Discussions in Analytical Chemistry

1 Credit (1)

Current research problems in analytical chemistry. May be repeated. Graded S/U.

CHEM 580. Discussions in Physical Chemistry

1 Credit (1)

Current research problems in physical chemistry. May be repeated. Graded S/U.

CHEM 598. Special Research Programs

1-3 Credits

Individual investigations, either analytical or experimental. Graded S/U.

CHEM 599. Master's Thesis

15 Credits

Thesis preparation.

CHEM 600. Research

1-15 Credits

Course used for assigning credit for research performed prior to successful completion of the doctoral qualifying examination.

CHEM 609. Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

1-3 Credits

Selected topics of current interest designated by subtitle.

CHEM 619. Topics in Organic Chemistry

1-3 Credits

Selected topics of current interest designated by subtitle.

CHEM 629. Advanced Topics in Analytical Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Discussion of advanced topics in the field of analytical chemistry. May be repeated with different subtitles. Consent of instructor required.

CHEM 639. Topics in Physical Chemistry

1-3 Credits

Selected topics of current interest designated by subtitle.

CHEM 650. Advanced Seminar

1 Credit (1)

Intended for students who have earned a master s degree or the equivalent. A discussion of current topics of interest in chemistry. May be repeated.

CHEM 700. Doctoral Dissertation

17 Credits

Dissertation preparation.

 

Phone: (575) 646-2505

Website: http://www.chemistry.nmsu.edu/