Anthropology

http://anthropology.nmsu.edu

Undergraduate Program Information

Anthropology is the study of humankind, a multidisciplinary endeavor involving the social sciences, the humanities, and the natural sciences. Anthropologists study the human species and the human condition in all its diversity. Anthropologists ask questions such as: "Who are we?" "Where did we come from?" "How did we get here?" "Why are we different from each other?" and, "How can we better understand each other?"

Studies in anthropology might focus, for example, on human paleontology, evolution, contemporary human health and biological variation, the culture of medicine and contemporary health systems, agriculture and foodways, historic archaeology of the Camino Real, Native American visual culture, Indigenous ways of knowing, gender and culture, or archaeology of the American Southwest and Mesoamerica.

Undergraduate education at New Mexico State University covers all four sub-disciplines of the field:

Biological Anthropology - the study of human origins, primate relatives, and human biological diversity

Archaeology - the study of the origin and change of the human past in both historic and prehistoric times, using material remains

Cultural Anthropology - the study of beliefs, values, shared understandings, traditions and modern practices of peoples from around the world

Linguistic Anthropology - the study of human language, linguistic diversity, and speech

Graduate Program Information

The Anthropology M.A. program is designed for students who are interested in the traditional sub-disciplines of anthropology, as well as such related fields as cultural resource management, food studies, medical anthropology, museum studies, and social impact assessment. The program is directed both toward students who intend to take a terminal M.A. degree and students who intend, after NMSU, to enter a Ph.D. program. In addition to the M.A. in anthropology, our program also offers graduate minors in anthropology, archaeology, food studies, and Native American studies, as well as graduate certificates in cultural resource management and museum studies.

An undergraduate anthropology degree is not required for entry into the M.A. program. Students who lack the equivalent of ANTH 301ANTH 315, and ANTH 355 may be required to take these courses. ANTH 350 or the equivalent is recommended.

Degrees for the Department

Bachelor Degree(s)

Anthropology - Bachelor of Arts

Master Degree(s)

Anthropology - Master of Arts

Professor, Rani T. Alexander, Department Head

Professors Alexander, Stanford, Walker; Associate Professors Arakawa, Jenks, Scott; Assistant Professors  Badoni, Batz (Visiting), Olszowy; College Professors  Pepion; Emeritus Professors  Benefit, Chaiken, Conelly, Eber, McCrossin, O'Leary, Rushforth, Staski, Trevathan. 

R. T. Alexander, Department Head, Ph.D. (New Mexico)– Mesoamerican archaeology, historical archaeology of Yucatan, ethnohistory and colonialism, agrarian ecology, zooarchaeology; F. Arakawa, Ph.D. (Washington State)– prehistoric American Southwest, lithic technological organization, pottery in Mesa Verde region, sociopolitical organization in tribal-level societies; G. Badoni (Arizona) - Native American visual culture studies, Native women studies, American Indian studies;  G. Batz, PhD (Texas - Austin) - extractivist industries and megaprojects in Latin America; Central American and Maya migration, displacement and diaspora; Guatemalan history; indigenous social movements; and human rights; K. Olszowy, Ph.D. (Binghamton) - economic development and chronic disease risk, sex/gender-based disparities in obesity risk, mental and physical health outcomes associated with natural disasters, child growth and development, and the biology of poverty; D. Pepion, Ed.D. (Montana State)– Native American studies, ethnohistory, anthropology and education; M. A. T. Scott, Ph.D. (Kentucky)– medical Anthropology, public health, transnational migration, Latin America; L. Stanford, Ph.D. (Florida)– agriculture, organizations, food studies, globalization, sociocultural anthropology, Latin America; W. Walker, Ph.D. (Arizona)– Southwestern archaeology, theory and field method in archaeology, ritual prehistory.

Anthropology Courses

ANTH 1115G. Introduction to Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

Anthropology is the systematic study of the humanity both past and present. The course introduces students to the four subfields of anthropology, which include archaeology, biological, linguistic and cultural anthropology. Students will learn about the concepts and methods that anthropologists use to study our species and gain a broader perspective on the human experience.

ANTH 1135G. Introduction to Biological Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

This course provides a basic introduction to the broad field of biological anthropology. The research interests of biological anthropologists include the history and development of modern evolutionary biology, molecular and population genetics, modern primates, the primate and human fossil record, and modern human biological diversity.

Corequisite(s): ANTH 1135L.

ANTH 1135L. Introduction to Biological Anthropology Lab

1 Credit (2P)

This laboratory course expand on the topics covered in lecture course and uses scientific methods and principles to examine evidence for the process of evolution, the nature of heredity, human evolutionary history and family tree relationships, primate ecology and behavior, and modern human diversity. Hands-on experience with fossil and skeletal material will be an important part of the learning process. Corequisite(s): ANTH 1135G

ANTH 1136. Introduction to Historic Preservation

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to historic preservation, its history, goals, methods, legal basis, and economic importance. Explores public role in decision-making. Community Colleges only.

ANTH 1137G. Human Ancestors

3 Credits (3)

Evolutionary history of the human species from its origin in the primate order, with primary emphasis on the evolution of humankind during the past three million years. Examination of the social lives of apes and consideration of similarities to and differences from them. Biological foundations of human behavior, emphasizing thought, movement, and interaction.

ANTH 1140G. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

This is an introductory course that provides an overview of cultural anthropology as a subfield within the broader discipline of anthropology and as a research approach within the social sciences more generally. The course presents core concepts and methods of cultural anthropology that are used to understand the ways in which human beings organize and experience their lives through distinctive cultural practices. More specifically, this course explores social and cultural differences and similarities around the world through a variety of topics such as: language and communication, economics, ways of making a living, marriage and family, kinship and descent, race, ethnicity, political organization, supernatural beliefs, sex and gender, and globalization. This course ultimately aims to present a broad range of perspectives and practices of various cultural groups from across the globe.

ANTH 1160G. World Archaeology

3 Credits (3)

This course is an exploration of human evolution and cultural development throughout the world. Students will be introduced to basic anthropological methods and theories and will learn how anthropological research has contributed to our understanding of major themes in human prehistory, including human evolution, the origins of culture, migration and colonization, animal and plant domestication, and the rise and fall of civilizations.

ANTH 2140G. Indigenous Peoples of North America

3 Credits (3)

This course is a general survey of the history and ethnology of indigenous groups in North America. The course is designed to give students a comprehensive view of major issues pertaining to the indigenous cultures of North America, such as family structure, social organization, subsistence and contemporary economies, environmental adaptation, Indian-White relations, religious practices, and contemporary issues.

ANTH 2150. Indigenous Peoples of the American Southwest

3 Credits (3)

This course is a study of indigenous cultural groups of the American Southwest. Students will explore historical and contemporary cultural and social patterns of American Indian, Hispanic and Anglo-American groups.

ANTH 2996. Special Topics

1-4 Credits

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

ANTH 301. Cultural Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

Human concepts of culture and life processes.

ANTH 305V. Contemporary Native Americans

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to contemporary native peoples and cultures of North America. Emphasis on sociocultural and socioeconomic history, sociocultural change and persistence, present day reservation life, and current social and economic goals.

ANTH 306V. Peoples of Latin America

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to cultural patterns and diversity of Latin America with emphasis on indigenous groups, peasants, plantation workers, and urban residents throughout South America, the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central America.

ANTH 307V. Japanese Culture and Society: Anthropological Perspectives

3 Credits (3)

This course introduces students to Japanese culture from anthropological and philosophical perspective. Learning about Japanese culture (non-Western) enhances students’ awareness of the diversity of human values, beliefs, and morals and provides an understanding of cultural differences outside of mainstream American culture.

ANTH 312. The Ancient Maya

3 Credits (3)

Archaeological evidence of culture change in the Maya civilizations of Mexico and Central America from 2000 BC to the Spanish Conquest.

ANTH 313V. Ancient Mexico

3 Credits (3)

Archaeological exploration of the development and culture change of the Aztec, Zapotec, and Maya civilizations of Mexico and Central America from 12,000 years ago to the Spanish invasion of 1521.

ANTH 315. Introduction to Archaeology

3 Credits (3)

Concepts and methods for study of prehistoric cultures; history of archaeological research.

ANTH 318. Historical Archaeology

3 Credits (3)

This survey course explores the development of historical archaeology, its methods and theory, and popular research themes within the discipline. Students will be introduced to the ways that archaeologists identify and analyze historical-period documents, oral histories, features, and artifacts, and how they use these data to deepen our understanding of the recent past. Crosslisted with: ANTH 518.

ANTH 320. Anthropological Linguistics

3 Credits (3)

The study of language and culture with particular emphasis on the cultural factors in the communication process.

ANTH 330V. Magic, Witchcraft and Religion

3 Credits (3)

Provides an overview of old and new methods and theories for the study of religion. Exposure to the ways groups of people in diverse cultural systems construct and change their religious traditions to serve practical and meaningful ends. Crosslisted with: HIST 330V and SOCI 330V.

ANTH 345. Introduction to Museology

3 Credits (3)

Museum philosophy, history, administration, and collection management. Emphasis on cataloging, care, and exhibition, as well as ethics and public responsibility.

ANTH 347. Museum Confidential

3 Credits (3)

This course will introduce students to many of the fundamental concepts behind the creation of a museum exhibition. Drawing from the extensive permanent collection of the University Museum, housed in the basement of Kent Hall, students will gain hands-on experience with exhibition development, resulting in the creation of a temporary public exhibition in the west gallery of the Museum. By turning the museum inside-out, this course will be a unique behind-the-scenes experience. Through readings and discussion, we will also examine historic and contemporary interpretations of exhibitions and collections from the cabinet of curiosity and wunderkammer, to readymades and Mark Dion’s re-imagined museums. Crosslisted with: ANTH 547.

ANTH 350. Anthropological Theory

3 Credits (3)

This course introduces students to historical and contemporary theory in anthropology with a focus on understanding why theory matters in our discipline. Key questions the course explores include: How have anthropologists thought about the concept of culture in different ways throughout the history of anthropology? What is the relevance of anthropological theory, both inside and outside the discipline? What new and promising trajectories do we see in anthropological theory today?

ANTH 355. Biological Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

An introduction to the fundamentals of the scientific method and organic evolution specific to the study of human origins and contemporary biological variation. Non-human primate diversity and behavior are also considered.

ANTH 356. Forensic Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

Overview of the field of forensic anthropology. Topics covered include basic human osteology; skeletal examination and documentation; skeletal trauma; personal identification; forensic taphonomy and the process of decomposition; archaeology and scene processing; sex, age, stature, and ancestry estimation; and contemporary issues and limitations in the field of forensic anthropology.

ANTH 357V. Medical Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

This course introduces students to evolutionary, ecological, interpretive, political-economic, and applied anthropological perspectives on health, illness, and healing to address some of the major questions in the field. How do humans adapt to changing environments that bring with them new illnesses and diseases? How do anthropologists understand the multiple meanings of health and illness cross-culturally? How can anthropologists effectively study health inequalities? What can medical anthropological perspectives contribute to addressing the health issues that we face in our current global context?

ANTH 360V. Food and Culture Around the World

3 Credits (3)

Study of the interaction between food and human culture from an anthropological perspective. Examines the traditional role of food in local economies, social relations, and identity around the world. Also examines the impact of globalization on traditional food systems and cultures.

ANTH 362V. Environmental Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

This course examines environmental studies from an anthropological perspective. The class focuses on how cultural values mediate environmental management. The class covers topics such as environmental anthropology, large scale development, biodiversity conservation, sustainable development, indigenous groups, consumption, and globalization.

ANTH 375. Pottery Analysis in Archaeology

3 Credits (3)

This course introduces the basic concepts, methods, and approaches used in the analysis of archaeological pottery. The purpose of the course is first to provide hands-on experience with the full range of analytical techniques routinely applied to ceramic materials recovered from archaeological sites, but to also provide a contextual framework for the interpretation and evaluation of these data. Classes consist of brief introductory lectures, and seminar presentation and discussion of course readings. Lab meetings consist of exercises designed to provide you with practical experience working with the materials and measures covered in lectures and readings. Crosslisted with: ANTH 575.

ANTH 376. Lithic Technology Organization

3 Credits (3)

Advanced seminars and laboratory exercises to learn and develop techniques and methods that will help us determine how to interpret behavioral and cultural information from lithic (stone tool) data.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 315.

ANTH 378. Introduction to Lab Methods in Archaeology

3 Credits (3)

Laboratory techniques used in the analysis of archaeological materials.

ANTH 385. Internship in Anthropology

3-12 Credits (3-12)

Applied or field experience to gain professional expertise. Placements with public agencies, NGOs, or research organizations. Topical focus tailored to student's individual needs through consultation with instructor.

Prerequisite(s): Junior status, consent of instructor and GPA 2.8 or better.

ANTH 388. Intermediate Archaelogical Field School

2-6 Credits (2-6)

Training in archaeological field methods, including excavations of prehistoric sites, record keeping, mapping and analysis of data. Consent of Instructor required.

ANTH 389. Archaeological Mapping

3-6 Credits (3-6)

Techniques for mapping archaeological sites and recording spatial distributions of archaeological data using a variety of surveying equipment and computer mapping software.

ANTH 399. Professionalism & Practice in Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

Capstone course for seniors designed to allow students to synthesize the anthropological knowledge they have acquired and connect theory to application in preparation for entry into a career. Restricted to: ANTH majors.

ANTH 402. Contemporary Medical Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

Contemporary Medical Anthropology This advanced seminar in medical anthropology addresses contemporary issues in the field of medical anthropology through theoretical and ethnographic texts. Topics span a wide range of studies in medical anthropology and may include such issues as the social production of health and illness, medical pluralism, discourses of mental health, the practice of complementary and alternative medicine, health disparities, the political economy of infectious disease, race and biological variation in biomedicine, and implementing biocultural perspectives. Crosslisted with: ANTH 546.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 301 or ANTH 355 or ANTH 357V or consent of instructor.

ANTH 415. Applied Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

Examines the intellectual roots of applied anthropology and early case studies of anthropologists working as administrators. Examines the ethical and methodological approaches that applied anthropologists employ. Examination of case studies that show role of applied anthropologists in improving human service delivery, cultural preservation, planning and implementing programs of participatory change, advocacy, and economic development. Taught with ANTH 515.

ANTH 419. Topics in Prehistoric Archaeology

3 Credits (3)

Specific subjects in prehistoric archaeology as announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

ANTH 431. Nutritional Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

Evolutionary and cross-cultural perspective on human nutrition.

ANTH 433V. Sex, Gender and Culture

3 Credits (3)

This seminar course introduces students to the anthropological study of gender. We take an integrated approach to the subject, considering the ways that that different kinds of anthropological research, including archaeology, biological anthropology, ethnography, etc.,expand our understanding of the various ways gender is defined across space and time, how it is lived, and what it means to us and others. Students will review the historical context and development of this subject within the field, and will explore such topics as sex versus gender, embodiment and gendered performance, gender hierarchies, the politics of reproduction, and globalization. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Crosslisted with: GNDR 433V.

ANTH 434. Human Evolution

3 Credits (3)

Overview of human biological evolution from the emergence of Miocene apes to modern human diaspora. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Crosslisted with: BIOL 434.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 355 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 435. Human Health and Biological Variation

3 Credits (3)

Overview of contemporary human biological variation and adaptability within a scientific evolutionary and biocultural framework. Special emphasis is placed on human adaptation to the environment and the sociocultural, epidemiological, and evolutionary factors that underlay contemporary issues in human health and disease. Crosslisted with: ANTH 535.

ANTH 441. Indigenizing Methodologies in Native American Studies

3 Credits (3)

This course utilizes decolonizing (indigenizing) methodologies and praxis to gain insight into the complex effects of oppression and colonization. The course uses critical and indigenous concepts to identify and analyze hegemonic, ethnocentric, historic and contemporary human rights and social justice issues of indigenous people. Emphasis includes research theory and methodology, such as community participatory action research, that is collaborative, inclusive, and pragmatic to ethics, intellectual property, and cultural boundaries of indigenous people. Crosslisted with: ANTH 541.

ANTH 444. Native American Visual Culture

3 Credits (3)

This course examines the various theoretical and methodological challenges inherent to the study of indigenous art, including the issues of identity, sovereignty, gender, cultural critique, and the role of the artist. In addressing the interdisciplinary nature of the field, students will seek to find strategies in approaching their own research. Crosslisted with: ANTH 544.

ANTH 449. Directed Reading

1-6 Credits

Comprehensive reading on selected topics. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Prerequisite(s): Upper division anthropology majors with consent of instructor.

ANTH 449 H. Directed Reading Honors

1-3 Credits

Same as ANTH 449. Additional work to be arranged. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

ANTH 453. Native American Women

3 Credits (3)

Students investigate the status, experience, and contributions of Native American women from pre-contact to contemporary times. Identifying the contribution of Native American women to societies, communities, and Nations as keepers of knowledge, teachings, and traditions. Crosslisted with: ANTH 553.

ANTH 455. Federal Indian Policy

3 Credits (3)

Federal Indian policy and its impact on Native Americans. This course will provide basic understanding of how federal Indian policy impacts almost all activities and situations with Native Americans. Course will also look at issues such as sovereignty and how it impacts most interactions with tribal groups.

ANTH 456. Native American Intersections in Museums

3 Credits (3)

This course explores the changing relationships and complex intersections between Native people and museums. We will examine how museum practices of collection and exhibition influence ways in which knowledge is formed and presented, and interrogate the role of museums as crucial sites for discourse around issues of ownership, indigenous knowledge and representation. Case studies revealing shifting meanings of objects, curatorial challenges, the development of tribal museums and repatriation complexities will be used to critically engage with Native responses via art, criticism and legal action. Crosslisted with: ANTH 556.

ANTH 458. Fertility, Reproduction and Birth

3 Credits (3)

This course examines biocultural variation in reproductive health and birth practices, with topics such as gendered roles and responsibilities, pregnancy and birth as rites of passage, cultural concepts of personhood, global family planning initiatives, the medicalization of pregnancy and birth, developing reproductive technologies, and reproductive health disparities.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 301 or ANTH 355 or ANTH 357V or consent of instructor.

ANTH 459. Peru: From Incas to Inca Kola

3 Credits (3)

Explores issues of cultural and national identity in Peru from the Incas to the present, focusing on the modern period. Themes include indigenous resistance and adaptation to colonial rule, nationalism, militarism, terrorism, globalization, and the drug trade. Crosslisted with: HIST 459

ANTH 467. Archaeology of the American Southwest

3 Credits (3)

Description and analysis of prehistoric archaeology of the American Southwest including paleo-environmental reconstruction, culture change, and relations with contemporary cultures.

Prerequisite: ANTH 315.

ANTH 472. Primate Behavior and Ecology

3 Credits (3)

Survey of the social behavior and ecology of nonhuman primates. Crosslisted with: BIOL 472.

ANTH 474. Human Osteology

3 Credits (3)

A survey of the functional, developmental, and evolutionary biology of the human skeleton. Identifying bones and teeth from hands-on experience with skeletal and dental material. Provides a foundation for human evolutionary studies, bioarchaeology and forensic anthropology. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Crosslisted with: BIOL 424.

ANTH 474 L. Human Osteology Lab

1 Credit (1P)

Laboratory for ANTH 474. Experiences and activities related to identifying teeth and bones of the human skeleton. Students are recommend to take ANTH 355 or an equivalent before enrolling in this course. Crosslisted with: BIOL 424 L.

Corequisite(s): ANTH 474.

ANTH 477. Zooarchaeology

3 Credits (3)

Detailed study and analysis of taphonomic processes affecting animal bone recovered from archaeological and paleontological contexts. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

ANTH 485. Special Research Project

1-3 Credits

Anthropological, archaeological, or museum field work or laboratory experience in academic, private, state, or federal agencies. Must spend 30 hours in a field, museum, or laboratory setting per credit hour earned. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Prerequisite(s): Complete 12 ANTH credits and consent of instructor.

ANTH 486. Community Engagement and Service Learning

3 Credits (3)

Course combines classroom instruction with a local community service project. Formal instruction component will examine social science research findings and perspectives on a locally relevant social issue or problem. In the service learning component, students will be trained and work on a local community service project. Students will develop field experience and methodological skills in community engagement. Projects and social issues may vary for different semesters.

ANTH 488. Archaeological Field School Advanced

1-6 Credits

Archaeological field methods, including excavations of prehistoric sites, record keeping, mapping and analysis of data. Consent of Instructor required.

ANTH 497. Special Topics

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Prerequisite(s): Junior or above standing.

ANTH 500. Seminar in Anthropological Theory

3 Credits (3)

Detailed focus on specific areas of anthropological theory. Course subtitled in the Schedule of Classes. Course may be repeated.

Prerequisite(s): graduate standing in Anthropology or consent of instructor.

ANTH 502. Fundamentals of Anthropology

1-4 Credits (1-4)

Review of fundamental knowledge and theories in biological, cultural, or linguistic anthropology or archaeology. Graded S/U.

ANTH 503. Anthropological Theory

3 Credits (3)

This seminar is designed to introduce graduate students to the major concepts and developments in anthropological theory. Students will develop an understanding of the major principles, contributions, and limitations of anthropological theory from the 1890s to the present. The course will address theoretical developments in biological anthropology, sociocultural anthropology, archaeology, and public and applied anthropology.

ANTH 505. Issues in Anthropological Practice

3 Credits (3)

Anthropological approaches to research design, implementation, and dissemination. Restricted to: Main campus only.

ANTH 506. Advanced Studies in Physical Anthropology

1-3 Credits

Lectures, seminars, or laboratory research in selected topics. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Prerequisite(s): graduate standing in Anthropology or consent of instructor.

ANTH 507. Advanced Studies in Archaeology

1-3 Credits

Lectures, seminars, field or laboratory research in selected topics. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Prerequisite(s): graduate standing in Anthropology or consent of instructor.

ANTH 508. Advanced Studies in Cultural Anthropology

1-3 Credits

Lectures, seminars, or field research in selected topics. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Prerequisite(s): graduate standing in Anthropology or consent of instructor.

ANTH 509. Advanced Studies in Anthropological Linguistics

1-3 Credits

Lectures, seminars, or field research in selected topics. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

ANTH 512. Quantitative Analytical Methods in Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

This class is an introduction to statistical analysis of anthropological and social science data. Students will learn how quantitative and statistical techniques are used in the analysis of anthropological problems and how to evaluate statistical arguments in the literature. No previous background in statistics is required. We will consider data collection, sampling and statistical populations, exploratory summaries of data, and the importance of choosing appropriate statistical techniques. All course work will emphasize anthropological interpretation through applied statistical methods. The course has a four-field focus (archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics), and students will work with readings, examples, and problem assignments from each subfield.

ANTH 515. Applied Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

Examines the intellectual roots of applied anthropology and early case studies of anthropologists working as administrators. Examines the ethical and methodological approaches that applied anthropologists employ. Examination of case studies that show the role of applied anthropologists in improving human service delivery, cultural preservation, planning and implementing programs of participatory change, advocacy, and economic development. Taught with ANTH 415.

ANTH 516. Advanced Archaeology of the American Southwest

3 Credits (3)

Advanced topics in Southwestern archaeology including ritual architecture, environmental reconstruction, violence, site formation processes, and experiment and research.

ANTH 517. Advanced Topics in Mesoamerican Archaeology

3 Credits (3)

Specific subjects in Mesoamerican archaeology to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ANTH 518. Advanced Historical Archaeology

3 Credits (3)

This survey course explores the development of historical archaeology, its methods and theory, and popular research themes within the discipline. Students will be introduced to the ways that archaeologists identify and analyze historical-period documents, oral histories, features, and artifacts, and how they use these data to deepen our understanding of the recent past. Crosslisted with: ANTH 318.

ANTH 519. Advanced Topics in Prehistoric Archaeology

3 Credits (3)

Seminar on specialized research archaeology.

Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ANTH 520. Ethnographic Field Methods

3 Credits (3)

Basic methodologies used in conducting qualitative ethnographic research. Projects in participant observation, ethnographic interviews, life history interviews, folk taxonomy construction, and coding of field notes.

ANTH 521. Advanced Anthropologist Study Odyssey

3-6 Credits (3-6)

This course allows students to explore an anthropological topic, such as an archaeological tradition or culture, through classroom and field activities. Students are initially exposed to a topic during several days of intensive in class work and then pursue greater understanding of the topic through a field trip and possibly limited fieldwork. Readings, site tours, on-site lectures by specialists, and field exercises provide students an opportunity to develop an understanding of anthropological perspectives on the topic as well as to provide exposure to anthropological field and analytic methods. This course also allows students to experience other cultures, prehistoric sites, and/or locales firsthand. May be repeated for credit under a different odyssey title. Taught with ANTH 386. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Consent of Instructor required.

ANTH 522. Archaeological Field School-Graduates

2-6 Credits

Techniques of archaeological data collection, analysis, and interpretation. Emphasis on archaeological field work in the Southwest.

ANTH 523. Archaeological Mapping

3-6 Credits (3-6)

Techniques for mapping archaeological sites and recording spatial distributions of archaeological data using a variety of surveying equipment and computer mapping software.

ANTH 526. Conquest and Colonialism

3 Credits (3)

Examination of major theoretical and methodological issues in historical anthropology and archaeology of the Americas from AD1500 to present, including conquest, colonialism, capitalism, and modernity as anthropological processes. The contributions and limitations of historical, ethnohistorical, and archaeological evidence are emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): graduate standing in Anthropology or History or consent of instructor.

ANTH 531. Issues in Nutritional Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

Evolutionary and cross-cultural perspective on human nutrition.

ANTH 533. Advanced Issues in Women, Gender, and Culture

3 Credits (3)

Survey of the history of anthropological ideas about gender and women, and a comparison of gender roles, relations, and ideologies across a range of cultures. Same as W S 533.

ANTH 534. Advanced Human Evolution

3 Credits (3)

Advanced overview of human biological evolution from the emergence of Miocene apes to the modern human diaspora. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Crosslisted with: BIOL 534.

ANTH 535. Adv. Human Health and Biological Variation

3 Credits (3)

Overview of contemporary human biological variation and adaptability within a scientific evolutionary and biocultural framework. Special emphasis is placed on human adaptation to the environment and the sociocultural, epidemiological, and evolutionary factors that underlay contemporary issues in human health and disease. Crosslisted with: ANTH 435.

ANTH 538. Plants, Culture, and Sustainable Development

3 Credits (3)

Study of role of indigenous cultures and indigenous knowledge systems in plant domestication, ethnoecology, and preservation of traditional crop diversity. Examination of issues related to conserving cultural diversity, food systems, food security and biodiversity.

ANTH 539. Culture and Foodways

3 Credits (3)

Study of interaction between food and culture from anthropological perspective. Study of role of food in cultural history, social relations, ritual, and identity. Examination of impact of globalization of food systems on traditional cultures, local food systems, and food security.

ANTH 540. Cultural Resource Management

3 Credits (3)

Study of federal and state of New Mexico historic preservation laws and regulations and their application in current Cultural Resource Management and a review of relevant case studies.

ANTH 541. Advanced Indigenizing Methodologies in Native American Studies

3 Credits (3)

This course utilizes indigenizing methodologies and praxis to gain insight into the complex effects of oppression and colonization. Critical and indigenous concepts are used to identify and analyze hegemonic, ethnocentric, historic and contemporary human rights and social justice issues of indigenous people. Research theory and methodology such as community participatory action research that is collaborative, inclusive, and pragmatic to ethics, intellectual property, and cultural boundaries of indigenous people is emphasized. Crosslisted with: ANTH 441.

ANTH 542. Cultural Resource Management II

3 Credits (3)

Continuation of ANTH 540. This course introduces students to the business and practice of doing contractual cultural resource management in the United States.

ANTH 543. Indigenous Ways of Knowing

3 Credits (3)

This course examines Indigenous knowledge and ways of knowing as a means to gain an appreciation of an epistemology and ontology that may be outside the boundaries of Eurocentric theory, concepts, and principles. Knowledge development through mythology and story telling is viewed from the nature of difference rather then comparative analysis.

ANTH 544. Advanced Native American Visual Culture

3 Credits (3)

This course examines the various theoretical and methodological challenges inherent to the study of indigenous art, including the issues of identity, sovereignty, gender, cultural critique, and the role of the artist. In addressing the interdisciplinary nature of the field, students will seek to find strategies in approaching their own research. Crosslisted with: ANTH 444.

ANTH 545. Advanced Museology I

3 Credits (3)

Museum philosophy, history, administration, and collection management. Emphasis on collecting, cataloging, care, and exhibition, as well as ethics, public responsibility, and grantsmanship.

ANTH 546. Advanced Contemporary Medical Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

This advanced seminar in medical anthropology addresses contemporary issues in the field of medical anthropology through theoretical and ethnographic texts. Topics span a wide range of studies in medical anthropology and may include such issues as the social production of health and illness, medical pluralism, discourses of mental health, the practice of complementary and alternative medicine, health disparities, the political economy of infectious disease, race and biological variation in biomedicine, and implementing biocultural perspectives. Crosslisted with: ANTH 402.

ANTH 547. Museum Field Methods

3 Credits (3)

This course will introduce students to many of the fundamental concepts behind the creation of a museum exhibition. Drawing from the extensive permanent collection of the University Museum, housed in the basement of Kent Hall, students will gain hands-on experience with exhibition development, resulting in the creation of a temporary public exhibition in the west gallery of the Museum. By turning the museum inside-out, this course will be a unique behind-the-scenes experience. Through readings and discussion, we will also examine historic and contemporary interpretations of exhibitions and collections from the cabinet of curiosity and wunderkammer, to readymades and Mark Dion’s re-imagined museums. Crosslisted with: ANTH 347.

ANTH 553. Advanced Native American Women

3 Credits (3)

Students investigate the status, experience, and contributions of Native American women from pre-contact to contemporary times. Identifying the contribution of Native American women to societies, communities, and Nations as keepers of knowledge, teachings, and traditions. Crosslisted with: ANTH 453.

ANTH 556. Advanced Native American Intersections in Museums

3 Credits (3)

This course explores the changing relationships and complex intersections between Native people and museums. We will examine how museum practices of collection and exhibition influence ways in which knowledge is formed and presented, and interrogate the role of museums as crucial sites for discourse around issues of ownership, indigenous knowledge and representation. Case studies revealing shifting meanings of objects, curatorial challenges, the development of tribal museums and repatriation complexities will be used to critically engage with Native responses via art, criticism and legal action. Crosslisted with: ANTH 456.

ANTH 572. Advanced Primate Behavior and Ecology

3 Credits (3)

Advanced review of non-human primate social behavior and ecology. Crosslisted with: BIOL 572.

ANTH 574. Advanced Human Osteology

3 Credits (3)

Advanced Human Osteology surveying the functional, developmental and evolutionary biology of the human skeleton. Identifying bones and teeth from hands-on experience with skeletal and dental material. Provides a foundation for human evolutionary studies, bioarchaeology and forensic anthropology. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Crosslisted with: BIOL 574.

ANTH 575. Advanced Pottery Analysis in Archaeology

3 Credits (3)

This course introduces the basic concepts, methods, and approaches used in the analysis of archaeological pottery. The purpose of the course is first to provide hands-on experience with the full range of analytical techniques routinely applied to ceramic materials recovered from archaeological sites, but to also provide a contextual framework for the interpretation and evaluation of these data. Classes consist of brief introductory lectures, and seminar presentation and discussion of course readings. Lab meetings consist of exercises designed to provide you with practical experience working with the materials and measures covered in lectures and readings. Crosslisted with: ANTH 375.

ANTH 576. Lithic Technology Organization

3 Credits (3)

Advanced seminars and laboratory exercises to learn and develop techniques and methods that will help us determine how to interpret behavioral and cultural information from lithic (stone tool) data. Consent of Instructor required.

ANTH 577. Advanced Zooarchaeology

3 Credits (3)

Detailed study and analysis of taphonomic processes affecting animal bone recovered from archaeological and paleontological contexts.

ANTH 578. Advanced Lab Methods in Archaeology

3 Credits (3)

Examination of advanced laboratory techniques used in the analysis of archaeological materials.

ANTH 579. Qualitative Data Analysis and Interpretation

3 Credits (3)

This course focuses on methods for qualitative data analysis, both computer-assisted and non-computer-assisted, and interpretation. It includes writing up data for academic articles or theses.

ANTH 585. Method and Theory in Archaeology

3 Credits (3)

Focus on major methodological and theoretical aspects of contemporary archeology.

ANTH 587. Field Work in Latin America

3-12 Credits

Covers anthropological field methods in Latin America that also incorporate in-field lab analysis. No S/U grading.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTH 596. Readings

1-6 Credits

Individual study of selected readings and topics. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Consent of instructor required.

ANTH 597. Internship

1-9 Credits

Anthropological or archaeological internship in private, state, or federal agency. May be repeated for a maximum of 18 credits. Consent of instructor required. Restricted to ANTH majors.

Prerequisite(s): graduate standing.

ANTH 598. Special Research Problems

1-6 Credits (6)

Individual analytic or experimental investigations. May be repeated under different subtitles for a maximum of 6 credits. Consent of instructor required. Restricted to ANTH majors.

Prerequisite(s): graduate standing.

ANTH 599. Master's Thesis

1-15 Credits

Thesis. Consent of instructor required. Restricted to ANTH majors.

Prerequisite(s): graduate standing.

Name: Pollyana Pérez, Department Administrator

Office Location: Breland Hall, Room 331

Phone: (575) 646-2725

Website: http://anthropology.nmsu.edu