Animal and Range Sciences

Undergraduate Program Information

The Department of Animal and Range Sciences provides opportunities for you to follow a variety of interests in modern scientific agriculture. The animal science curriculum provides a background for many phases of the food animal industry, from farm animal production on rangelands to management positions in the food processing industry to highly technical careers in research and companion animal management. The range science curriculum provides you with knowledge and skills necessary to sustainably manage rangelands for multiple uses. These curricula allow you to acquire the background necessary to adjust easily to variations in specific job opportunities. If you are majoring in either animal science or range science, you must meet general education requirements, have a minimum of 48 credits of upper-division courses (numbered 300 and above), and complete a minimum of 35 credits in courses in the College Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences.

Graduate Program Information

The Department of Animal and Range Sciences offers graduate work leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees with majors in animal science and range science. The Doctor of Philosophy degree in animal science is only in the areas of reproductive physiology or ruminant nutrition.

Prerequisite for admission as a regular graduate student in the department is the completion of a curriculum, substantially equivalent to that required of undergraduate students in animal or range science at this institution, 3.0 GPA, and three letters of reference.

For the Master of Science degree, a minimum of 30 semester credits of graduate work in the major and related subjects will be required, together with a thesis for most majors. A non-thesis option is available for certain students.

For the Master of Agriculture with specialization in Domestic Animal Biology, students must complete 32 credit hours of graduate courses which include 2 credits of ANSC 598 Special Research Programs for the creative component.

The Doctor of Philosophy student must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language or research tool, such as experimental statistics, philosophy of science, computer science, or mathematics. Choice of the research tool will remain the option of the student subject to approval by the student’s graduate committee. Demonstration of proficiency may be accomplished by satisfactory completion of courses or by other suitable evidence acceptable to the student’s committee. In addition, doctoral students are required to complete advanced courses in a field of study closely related to animal science or range science. The number of courses to be completed in the related area will be determined by the student’s committee. Related areas of study often are biology, chemistry, or experimental statistics.

The Department of Animal and Range Sciences is a sponsoring department in the recently approved interdisciplinary graduate degree program that offers both a MS and Ph.D. degree in Water Science Management. The degree program is being handled through the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES), and the program description, including application guidelines, classes involved, and topic areas being supported can be found in the catalog under the section describing ACES Programs. Interested students are encouraged to contact the Department Head of Animal and Range Sciences, Shanna Ivey at (575) 646-2515 for more information.

Graduate work in the department is designed to prepare the student for work in the fields of research, extension, teaching, production, and conservation.

Facilities available to graduate students include herds and flocks of the major livestock species, animal nutrition laboratories, physiology laboratories, meats laboratory, small animal laboratory, 25,000-specimen herbarium, two ranches of approximately 92,000 acres, and a 1,000-head experimental feedlot. Active cooperation is maintained with federal research agencies located on and off the campus.

A number of graduate assistantships will be available each year. Inquiries should be addressed to the head of the department.

Professor, Shanna Ivey, Interim Department Head

Professors Bailey, Cibils, Duff, Fernald, Hubbert, Holechek, Löest, Soto, Wise

Associate Professors  Ashley, Burcham, Fasenko, Ganguli, Scholljegerdes, White

Assistant Professors  Geli, Summers

College Track Assistant Professors  Campbell, Fuentes, Pridhoko

Instructors  Priest

Co-operators (USDA) Estell, Herrick, Peters

Emeritus Faculty Abbott, Allred, McDaniel, Ross, Thomas

S. L. Ivey, Department Head, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University)- ruminant nutrition/microbiology; K. W. Allred, Ph.D. (emeritus, Texas A&M University)– plant taxonomy; R.L. Ashley, Ph.D. (Colorado State University)– physiology of reproduction; D.W. Bailey, Ph.D. (Colorado State University)– rangeland management; A.F. Cibils, Ph.D. (Colorado State University)– grazing management and ecology; G.C. Duff,  Ph.D. (New Mexico State University)-animal nutrition; G.M. Fasenko, Ph.D. (North Carolina State University)– companion animal management; A. G. Fernald, Ph.D. (Colorado State University)– land use hydrology and water quality hydrology; A.C. Ganguli, Ph.D. (Oklahoma State University)- range restoration; H. M. E. Geli, Ph.D. (Utah State University)-Landscape Hydrology; J. Hernandez-Gifford, Ph.D. (Washington State University)-Reproductive Physiology; J. L. Holechek, Ph.D. (Oregon State)– range ecology; M.E. Hubbert, Ph.D., (University of Alaska-Fairbanks)– ruminant nutrition;  C. A. Löest, Ph.D. (Kansas State University)– ruminant nutrition; K. C. McDaniel, Ph.D. (emeritus, Texas A&M University)– brush management; T. T. Ross, Ph.D. (emeritus, North Carolina State University)– physiology of reproduction and sheep production; E.J. Scholljegerdes, Ph.D. (University of Wyoming)– ruminant nutrition; S.A. Soto-Navarro, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University)– ruminant nutrition; A.F. Summers, Ph.D. (University of Nebraska)-Physiology of reproduction; J. D. Thomas, Ph.D. (emeritus, University of Missouri-Columbia)– meat science; L. M. White, Ph.D. (Clemson)– equine science; M. E. Wise, Ph.D. (University of Nebraska)– physiology of reproduction.

Adjunct faculty: C. D. Allison, Ph.D. (Texas A&M University)– range management; K. M. Harvstad, Ph.D. (Utah State University)– range animal nutrition; J.E. Herrick, Ph.D. (Ohio State University)– soils; M.R. Levi, Ph. D. (University of Arizona)-soil morphology/classification; T.J. Nagaraja, Ph.D. (Kansas State University)-rumen microbiology; D.P. Peters, Ph.D. (Colorado State University)– landscape ecology; S. Spiegal, Ph.D. (University of California Berkeley)-range management.

Cooperative Extension Service:  D. Cram, Ph.D. (New Mexico State University)- range science; C. Gifford, Ph. D. (University of Idaho)-animal science; J. L. Turner, Ph.D. (Kansas State University)– equine immunology and physiology;  M. Ward, Ph.D. (North Dakota State University)- ruminant nutrition; K. Young, Ph.D. (Brigham Young University)-Brush & Weed Specialist

Animal Science

ANSC 100. Introductory Animal Science

3 Credits

Orientation and survey of livestock industry in the United States; introduction to feeding, breeding, and management practices for producing farm animals and select companion animals.

ANSC 100 L. Introductory Animal Science Laboratory

1 Credit

Students will observe and participate in activities related to farm animal management and will include areas of livestock selection, nutrition, reproductive physiology, animal ID and animal health. This lab is required for animal science majors. Pre/

Corequisite(s): ANSC 100.

ANSC 103. Introductory Horse Science

3 Credits (2+2P)

The light horse industry; breeds; introduction to feeding, breeding, marketing and management; handling and selecting horses for breeding and performance.

ANSC 112. Companion Animals in Society

3 Credits

Examination of the historical, current, and potential future roles of companion animals in human society. Topics include animal domestication, breeds, exotic companion animals, the companion animal industry, and competitions and sports involving companion animals. Emphasis is on canine and feline species. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only.

ANSC 190. Western Equitation I

2 Credits

Basic principles of Western riding, including care and management of the riding horse, equitation equipment, and development of riding skills.

ANSC 200. Introduction to Meat Animal Production

3 Credits (2+2P)

Production and utilization of beef cattle, sheep and swine; emphasis on feeding, breeding, management problems and marketing; selection of animals for breeding and market.

ANSC 201. Introduction to Genetics for Animal Production

3 Credits

Introduction to genetics and inheritance relative to livestock production. Introduction to procedures for collection and use of performance information in livestock improvement programs.

Prerequisites: BIOL 111G.

ANSC 220. Animal Science Career Development

1 Credit

Introduction to scientific disciplines and career options in animal-agriculture career-skill development, including resume preparation, networking, importance of internships, and leadership experiences in animal agriculture.

ANSC 250. Special Topics

1-4 Credits

Specific subjects and credits to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Maximum of 4 credits per semester. No more than 9 credits toward a degree.

ANSC 261. Introduction to Animal Metabolism

3 Credits

Principles underlying the mechanisms of animal metabolism as they relate to production, maintenance, and health of animals.

Prerequisite: CHEM 111G.

ANSC 262. Introduction to Meat Science

3 Credits (2+3P)

Fundamental aspects of the red meat industry. Lecture topics and laboratory exercises include the nutrient value of meat, meat preservation, meat safety, muscle structure and contraction, slaughter and processing of beef, lamb, and pork, sausage manufacture, meat curing, meat cookery, and muscle and bone anatomy.

ANSC 285. Introduction to Companion Animal Science

3 Credits

Introduction to the care of common companion animal species. Species specific housing and nutrition are covered in the context of maximizing animal health and well-being and reducing disease. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

ANSC 288. Horse Fitting and Selling

3 Credits

Preparation of horses for sale; planning and conduct of auction sale; application of marketing principles relating to selling horses.

Prerequisite: ANSC 103 or consent of instructor.

ANSC 289. Management of Equine Operations

3 Credits

Introduction and application of business skills necessary to effectively manage the equine operation. Students will learn how to use strategic thinking and sound business management practices to succeed in the demanding equine industry.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 103 or consent of instructor.

ANSC 290. Western Equitation II

2 Credits

Intermediate principles of Western riding, including reading horse behavior, limbering-up exercises, and developing riding skills. Introduction to rollbacks, turnarounds and stops.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANSC 295. Team Competition in Animal Science

1-2 Credits

Training in team competition in the animal sciences. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Consent of Instructor required.

ANSC 301. Animal and Carcass Evaluation

3 Credits (2+2P)

Determination of the market value of meat animals by relating live animal and carcass traits. Topics include the identification of economically important traits, grading, growth and development, wholesale and retail pricing, and futures and options markets.

ANSC 302. Therapeutic Horseback Riding I

3 Credits

Basic principles and understanding of horsemanship and therapeutic riding, including equipment, safety, how to be an effective volunteer, side walker, and horse handler. Consent of instructor required.

ANSC 303. Livestock, Meat and Wool Evaluation

4 Credits (3+2P)

Selection, classification, grading, and judging of livestock, meat, and wool.

ANSC 304. Feeds and Feeding

3 Credits (2+2P)

Digestibility of feeds, their nutritive values, grades, and classes, principles of ration formulation and computer ration formulations, and practical feeding of farm animals.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111G, General Chemistry I.

ANSC 305. Principles of Genetics

3 Credits

Covers fundamental principles of reproduction, variation, and heredity in plants and animals. Crosslisted with: AGRO 305, BIOL 305, HORT 305 and GENE 305

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 111G, BIOL 211G and either CHEM 111G or CHEM 115.

ANSC 308. Horse Evaluation

4 Credits (2+4P)

Students will acquire a working knowledge of selection and classification of horses, learn criteria for evaluation and selection of breeding and show animals, gain a broad understanding of judging conformation and performance in the horse, and learn effective oral and written communication skills through defense of class placings. This course is considered an introduction to the NMSU Horse Judging Team.

ANSC 310. Exhibiting Livestock

3 Credits (1+4P)

Fitting and showing beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep and swine.

ANSC 312V. Companion Animals and the Human- Animal Interaction

3 Credits

The science behind human-animal interactions (HAI). An examination of the interactions between humans and companion animals and the effects on human and animal health and wellness. Cultural differences in HAI will be explored. Topics will include Animal Assisted Activity (AAA), Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT), and service animals. Emerging and future uses of companion animals in HAI will be discussed.

ANSC 320. Equine Behavior and Training

3 Credits

Basic principles, methods and philosophies of handling, breaking and training the two-year-old Western horse. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 290 or consent of instructor.

ANSC 321. Advanced Equine Behavior and Training

3 Credits

Continuation of ANSC 320. Further development of skills required to advance the training of the two-year-old Western horse. Emphasis will be placed on lateral work, lead changes, turn-arounds, obstacles, and making the horse accustomed to ranch and trail riding situations.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 320 or consent of instructor.

ANSC 325. Food and Agribusiness Finance and Planning

3 Credits

Same as AG E 325. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Crosslisted with: AG E 325.

ANSC 350. Special Topics

1-4 Credits

Specific subjects and credits to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Maximum of 4 credits per semester. No more than 9 credits toward a degree.

ANSC 351V. Agricultural Animals of the World

3 Credits

Global study of the development and use of animals for production of food and nonfood products. Climatic, cultural, and economic influences on systems of livestock production and species and breeds of livestock utilized will be evaluated.

ANSC 353. Advanced Livestock Evaluation

2 Credits

Advanced selection, classification and grading of livestock. May be repeated up to 2 credits. Consent of Instructor required.

ANSC 363. Meat Technology

3 Credits

Structure function and composition of muscles; factors influencing conversion of muscle to meat; buying, palatability and nutritive value of meat and meat products.

ANSC 370. Anatomy and Physiology of Farm Animals

4 Credits (3+2P)

Structure and function of the animal body. Includes studies of the horse, cow, sheep, pig, and comparisons with the human body.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111G and BIOL 111G or BIOL 211G.

ANSC 383. Equine Reproductive Management

3 Credits (1+4P)

Anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology of reproduction of the mare and stallion; training in modern reproductive techniques employed in the horse industry.

Prerequisites: ANSC 103, ANSC 289, and ANSC 370.

ANSC 390. Internship

1-3 Credits

Professional work experience under the joint supervision of the employer and a faculty member. A written report is required. No more than 3 credits toward a degree. Graded S/U.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANSC 391. Undergraduate Research Experience

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Formal laboratory, library, or field study of problems related to animal sciences, emphasizing hypothesis development, testing, and reporting results. Projects are preplanned, reviewed, and approved. Students submit periodic written reports and final written and oral reports. May be repeated for a maximum of three credits. Consent of Instructor required.

Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor.

Corequisite(s): NO.

ANSC 392. Animal Sciences Teaching/Extension Experience

1-3 Credits (1-3)

: Formal teaching experience related to animal sciences supervised by a faculty member. May involve classroom instruction, educational material development, and/or student evaluation and assessment. Students may also be involved in development, implementation, or assessment of adult or youth educational programs related to animal sciences, supervised by a faculty member. Students submit periodic written reports and a final written and oral report. May be repeated for a maximum of three credits. Consent of Instructor required.

ANSC 395. Team Competition II

1-2 Credits

Advanced training in team competition in the animal sciences. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Consent of Instructor required.

ANSC 402. Animal Science Seminar

1 Credit

Review of the current literature in animal sciences. Oral and written reports.

ANSC 411. Canine and Feline Behavior and Training

3 Credits

The influence of domestication, breeds, genetics, and physiology on the behavior of canine and feline species. Training methods and modification of problem behaviors are examined. The impact of the pet parent on their animal's behavior is addressed. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior status or consent of the instructor.

ANSC 412. Canine and Feline Health and Diseases

3 Credits

A review of common infectious and non-infectious diseases and the basics of the immune response. Pathophysiology and treatment of these diseases and the role the pet parent plays in pre-disposing their animals to disease. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 285 or consent of instructor.

ANSC 421. Physiology of Reproduction

4 Credits (3+2P)

Fertility and the role of hormones, nutrition, selection, management and environment in the maintenance of high reproductive rate.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 370.

ANSC 422. Animal Nutrition

3 Credits

Nutrient utilization and measurement and nutrient requirements for the various body functions.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211 or CHEM 313 or ANSC 261.

ANSC 423. Animal Breeding

3 Credits (2+2P)

Mating systems, and selection procedures; calculation of inbreeding coefficients, genetic relationships, and gene frequency.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 201 or 305.

ANSC 424. Swine Production

3 Credits (2+2P)

Breeding, feeding, and care of swine.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 304.

ANSC 425. Horse Science and Management

3 Credits (2+2P)

Senior level course requiring students to apply basic knowledge acquired in the previous courses to solve typical problems encountered in the horse industry. Specific topics include genetics and animal breeding, business and legal issues, reproduction, health, nutrition and exercise physiology.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 304 and ANSC 370 or concurrent registration.

ANSC 426. Beef Production: Cow-Calf Management

3 Credits (2+2P)

Senior level course examining management practices for the cow-calf producers. Specifically focusing on nutrition, reproduction, genetics, marketing, and health. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 304 and (ANSC 201 or ANSC 305) or concurrent registration.

ANSC 427. Dairy Production

3 Credits (2+2P)

Breeding, nutrition, physiology and management of dairy cattle.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 304 and (ANSC 201 or ANSC 305) or concurrent registration.

ANSC 428. Sheep and Wool Production

3 Credits (2+2P)

Genetics, nutrition, physiology and management of sheep. Wool grading, shearing, and disease control.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 304 and junior status.

ANSC 429. Beef Production: Feedlot Management

3 Credits

Senior level course in feedlot management of beef cattle. Topics of interest include cattle handling and processing, health and nutrition, intake management, and growth. Feed mill operation, marketing strategies, and regulatory concerns associated with finishing cattle production may also be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 304 or Consent of Instructor.

ANSC 448. Problems

1-4 Credits

Individual investigation in a specific area of animal science. Maximum of 4 credits per semester. No more than 6 credits toward a degree. Consent of Instructor required.

ANSC 458. Livestock Behavior, Welfare and Handling

3 Credits (2+3P)

Principles of animal behavior and evaluation of management practices on animal welfare in confined and rangeland livestock operations. Low stress livestock handling techniques. Design of livestock handling facilities. Crosslisted with: RGSC 458

Prerequisite(s): RGSC 294 or ANSC 100.

ANSC 462. Parasitology

3 Credits

Same as EPWS 462.

ANSC 462 L. Parasitology Lab

1 Credit

Classification, biological effects, and management of animal parasites of man, domestic animals, and wildlife. One-hour lab is optional. Same as EPWS 462.

ANSC 468. Advanced Dairy Herd Management

3 Credits

The course is offered through the Southern Great Plains Dairy Consortium in Clovis, NM, and will include breeding, nutrition, physiology, health and management of large herd dairies of the Southwest. Students must apply for the course through the Consortium, and can take it more than once, as topics vary. Consent of instructor required.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 304.

ANSC 480. Environmental Physiology of Domestic Animals

3 Credits

Influence of environmental factors on physiological processes of domestic animals.

Prerequisite: ANSC 370.

ANSC 484. Ruminant Nutrition

3 Credits

Energy, nitrogen, and mineral nutrition of ruminants with special emphasis on digestive physiology and metabolism of nonprotein nitrogen compounds.

Prerequisite: ANSC 422.

ANSC 488. Equine Nutrition and Exercise Physiology

3 Credits (2+2P)

Students will gain an in-depth understanding of nutrition and exercise physiology in the horse. Students will investigate the response of major physiological systems to exercise, conditioning and training, gastrointestinal physiology, nutrition requirements and clinical nutrition of the horse.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): Junior standing or consent of instructor.

ANSC 501. Advanced Animal Nutrition (so)

3 Credits

Emphasis on digestive physiology and metabolism. Basic mechanisms involved in the intake, digestion, and absorption of nutrients studied. Crosslisted with: HNDS 501

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211 or consent of instructor.

ANSC 504. Animal Physiology Techniques (se)

4 Credits

Radioimmunoassay procedures. Methods and procedures for conducting reproductive physiology research in livestock. Includes animal preparation, sample collection, laboratory and cell culture procedures.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANSC 507. Laboratory Techniques in Nutrition (f)

4 Credits (2+6P)

Methodology and experimental procedures in measuring nutrient requirements and value of diets. Same as HNDS 507.

Prerequisites: ANSC 422 or consent of instructor.

ANSC 509. Endocrinology of Domestic Animals (f)

3 Credits

The role of hormones in growth, development, metabolism, temperature regulation, lactation, and reproduction of domestic animals, including commercial applications.

ANSC 510. Range Nutrition Techniques (se)

3 Credits

Animal and plant methods of determining quantity and quality of range forage. Same as RGSC 510.

Prerequisite: ANSC 484 or consent of instructor.

ANSC 512. Research Methods in Animal Science (s)

4 Credits (3+2P)

Procedures used in animal science research, including planning and conduct of investigations and interpretation of results. Same as HNDS 512.

ANSC 515. Graduate Seminar

1 Credit

Current topics. Same as HNDS 517.

ANSC 520. Advanced Nutritional Management I: Feedlot (se)

3 Credits

Emphasis on feeding systems for beef cattle from weaning to slaughter. Primary focus on feedlot nutrition and management.

Prerequisite: ANSC 484 or consent of instructor.

ANSC 521. Advanced Nutritional Management II: Cow Calf/Stocker (so)

3 Credits

Emphasis on nutritional management for cow-calf and stocker operations. Primary focus on applications to range animal nutrition and management.

Prerequisite: ANSC 484 or consent of instructor.

ANSC 522. Animal Nutrition (f)

3 Credits

Nutrient utilization and measurement; nutrient requirements for the various body functions. Taught with ANSC 422 and same as HNDS 522 with additional requirements for graduate students. Recommended for nonmajors. Crosslisted with: HNDS 522

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211.

ANSC 560. Rumen Microbiology (so)

3 Credits

Issues in ruminal and gastrointestinal microbiology. Includes physiological and genetic mechanisms in carbohydrate and nitrogen utilization. Same as FSTE 560.

Prerequisites: ANSC/HNDS 501 and CHEM 546.

ANSC 580. Environmental Physiology of Domestic Animals

3 Credits

Influence of environmental factors on physiological processes of domestic animals. Specific focus on fetal and developmental programming, heat and cold stress.

ANSC 588. Equine Nutrition and Exercise Physiology

3 Credits

Students will gain and in-depth understanding of nutrition and exercise, conditioning and training, gastrointestinal physiology, nutrition requirements and clinical nutrition of the horse.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): ANSC 304 and ANSC 422.

ANSC 598. Special Research Programs

1-4 Credits (1-4)

Individual investigations, either analytical or experimental. Maximum of 4 credits per semester. No more than 6 credits toward a degree. Consent of Instructor required.

ANSC 599. Master's Thesis

15 Credits

Thesis. Consent of Instructor required. Thesis/Dissertation Grading.

ANSC 600. Research

1-15 Credits

This course is for Ph.D. students before they have completed qualifiers. Consent of Instructor required. Thesis/Dissertation Grading.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 421 or consent of instructor.

ANSC 602. Advanced Reproductive Physiology (fo)

3 Credits

Mechanisms of reproductive function; research methodology.

Prerequisite(s): ANSC 421 or consent of instructor.

ANSC 602 L. Molecular Techniques in Reproductive Physiology (fo)

2 Credits

Molecular biology techniques used in the study of reproductive physiology in domestic animals. Extraction of RNA, DNA from endocrine tissues, northern analysis, culture of pituitary/ovarian tissue. Mechanisms of hormone action.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANSC 604. Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal-Pineal Endocrinology (fe)

1 Credit

Hormones and other neurochemicals synthesized and secreted by the hypothalamus, pituitary, and pineal glands. Neuroendocrinology of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal axis.

Prerequisite: ANSC 509.

ANSC 605. Gonadal and Uterine Endocrinology (fe)

1 Credit

Endocrinology of mammalian ovaries, testes, and uteri including developing trophoblasts.

Prerequisite: ANSC 509.

ANSC 606. Endocrinology of Pregnancy, Parturition, and Lactation (fe)

1 Credit

Hormones and other chemical messengers involved in maintenance of pregnancy, control of parturition, and initiation and maintenance of lactation in farm animals.

Prerequisite: ANSC 509.

ANSC 621. Metabolic Functions and Dysfunctions (fe)

3 Credits

Physiological chemistry of ruminants and other domestic animals, with attention to metabolic dysfunctions and nutritional toxicology. Same as HNDS 621.

Prerequisites: CHEM 345 and ANSC 501.

ANSC 625. Nutrient Metabolism I: Mineral, Vitamin, and Nitrogen Metabolism (fo)

4 Credits

Cellular metabolism, physiological function(s), toxicities, and deficiencies of minerals, vitamins and nitrogen in ruminants and nonruminants. Same as HNDS 625.

Prerequisite: ANSC/HNDS 501.

ANSC 626. Nutrient Metabolism II: Carbohydrates, Lipids, and Energetics (se)

4 Credits

Basic principles of carbohydrate, lipid, and energy metabolism; integration of metabolism with emphasis on nutritional and biochemical processes related to efficiency of nutrient use. Same as HNDS 626.

Prerequisite: ANSC 501 or HNDS 501.

ANSC 698. Special Research Programs

1-4 Credits

Advanced individual investigations, either analytical or experimental. Maximum of 4 credits per semester. No more than 6 credits toward a degree. Consent of Instructor required.

ANSC 700. Doctoral Dissertation

15 Credits

Dissertation. Consent of Instructor required. Thesis/Dissertation Grading.

Range Science

RGSC 150. Rangeland Science Profession

1 Credit

Introduction to scientific disciplines and career opportunities in rangeland science and management.

RGSC 250. Special Topics

1-4 Credits

Specific subjects and credits announced in the Schedule of Classes. Maximum of 4 credits per semester and a grand total of 9 credits.

RGSC 294. Rangeland Resource Management

3 Credits

Overview of arid and semi-arid ecosystems in the US and abroad, rangeland plant physiology, ecology of rangeland plant communities and ecosystems, sustainable management for multiple uses including grazing livestock production, wildlife habitat, recreation and ecosystem services, and economics of rangeland-based enterprises. Restricted to: Main campus only.

RGSC 302V. Forestry and Society

3 Credits

Global study of the development and use of forest resources for production of wood, fuel, fiber, and food products. Climatic, edaphic, cultural, and economic influences on forests of the world evaluated. Same as HORT 302V.

RGSC 316. Rangeland Plants

3 Credits (2+3P)

Identification, classification, cultural uses, and economic importance of native and introduced rangeland plants.

RGSC 317. Rangeland Communities

3 Credits

Rangeland associations and communities, their plant species composition, and ecological factors affecting management of communities.

RGSC 318. Watershed Management

3 Credits (2+2P)

Management of rangeland and forest watersheds with emphasis on hydrologic cycle and land use effects on runoff and water quality.

RGSC 325. Rangeland Restoration Ecology

3 Credits

Principles and practices of vegetation management and ecological restoration. Course emphasizes problems associated with rangeland degradation, and implementation of rangeland restoration and improvements.

Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or consent of instructor.

RGSC 350. Special Topics

1-4 Credits

Specific subjects and credits announced in the Schedule of Classes. Maximum of 4 credits per semester and a grand total of 9 credits.

RGSC 357. Grass Taxonomy and Identification

3 Credits (1+4P)

Taxonomy of grasses; grass anatomy, variation in reproductive structures, and identification of grasses by sight and through the use of dichotomus keys.

Prerequisite/Corequisite(s): Junior Standing or consent of the instructor.

RGSC 390. Internship

1-3 Credits

Professional work experience under the joint supervision of the employer and a faculty member. A written report is required. No more than 3 credits toward a degree. Graded S/U.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

RGSC 402. Seminar

1 Credit

Topics in range science. Oral and written reports.

Prerequisite: senior standing.

RGSC 406. Rangeland Team Competition

1 Credit

Description and characteristics of range plants. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits.

RGSC 440. Rangeland Resource Ecology

3 Credits

Plant adaptations to arid environments. Life histories of arid land plants. Biotic interactions among rangeland organisms. Arid land plant communities: their physiognomy, diversity, productivity, and response to disturbance. Arid land ecosystem dynamics.

Prerequisite(s): Senior standing.

RGSC 440 L. Rangeland Resource Ecology Lab

1 Credit

Living and nonliving factors of the range environment, the life forms and role of range plants and animals on succession and interactions in range ecosystems. Corerequisite(s): RGSC 440.

RGSC 448. Problems

1-4 Credits (1-4)

Individual investigation in a specific area of range science. Maximum of 4 credits per semester and a grand total of 6 credits. Consent of Instructor required.

RGSC 452. Vegetation Measurements for Rangeland Assessment

4 Credits (2+4P)

Sampling principles, sampling design, and measurement methods used to quantify vegetation attributes and to assess the structure and function of rangeland ecosystems. Laboratory emphasizes practical field techniques, quantitative analysis, and interpretation of results.

Prerequisite(s): RGSC 294 and A ST 311.

RGSC 458. Livestock Behavior, Welfare and Handling

3 Credits (2+3P)

Principles of animal behavior and evaluation of management practices on animal welfare in confined and rangeland livestock operations. Low stress livestock handling techniques. Design of livestock handling facilities. Crosslisted with: ANSC 458

Prerequisite(s): RGSC 294 or ANSC 100.

RGSC 460. Rangeland and Natural Resource Planning and Management

4 Credits (3+3P)

Planning and problem solving in rangeland and natural resource management. Public land planning and policy. Application of land management principles to resolve rangeland, riparian and habitat issues.

Prerequisite(s): Senior or graduate student standing.

RGSC 509. Approaches to Rangeland Research

3 Credits

Experimental design and statistical analysis of experimental results.

Prerequisite(s): A ST 505 or consent of instructor.

RGSC 513. Advanced Rangeland Ecology

3 Credits

Overview of the current state of knowledge in selected areas of rangeland ecology, with emphasis on currently developing ideas and issues relevant to rangeland management.

Prerequisite(s): RGSC 440 or equivalent.

RGSC 515. Graduate Seminar

1 Credit

Current topics. Graded S/U.

RGSC 516. Arid Land Management

3 Credits

Survey of seminal and current literature dealing with management of arid and semiarid lands including soil-plant-animal interactions, plant community ecology, arid land assessment methods, and arid land hydrology.

RGSC 518. Watershed Methods and Management

3 Credits

Management of rangeland and forest watersheds with emphasis on the hydrologic cycle and land use effects on runoff and water quality. Hydrologic monitoring methods problem sets required for graduate credit.

RGSC 520. Arid Land Plant Herbivore Interactions

3 Credits

Survey of seminal and current literature dealing with plant- and animal-related factors that influence herbivory patterns in arid landscapes. Although ungulate herbivory is a central focus of the course, the role of plant defenses in deterring both vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores is discussed in detail.

RGSC 525. Advanced Rangeland Restoration Ecology

3 Credits

Principles and practices of vegetation management and ecological restoration. Course emphasizes problems associated with rangeland degradation, and implementation of rangeland restoration and improvements. Research paper required for graduate credit.

RGSC 550. Special Topics

1-4 Credits

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Maximum of 4 credits per semester. No more than 9 credits toward a degree.

RGSC 557. Advanced Grass Taxonomy and Identification

3 Credits

Taxonomy of grasses; grass anatomy, variation in reproductive structures, and identification of grasses by sight and through the use of dichotomous keys. Additional writing and grass identification assignments are required for graduate credit.

RGSC 598. Special Research Program

1-4 Credits

Individual investigations, either analytical or experimental. Maximum of 4 credits per semester. No more than 6 credits toward a degree. Consent of Instructor required.

RGSC 599. Master's Thesis

15 Credits

Thesis. Consent of Instructor required. Thesis/Dissertation Grading.

RGSC 600. Doctoral Research

1-15 Credits

Research. Consent of Instructor required. Thesis/Dissertation Grading.

RGSC 616. Advanced Arid Land Management

3 Credits

In depth discussion of seminal and current literature dealing with management of arid and semiarid lands including land tenure systems, soil-plant-animal interactions (emphasis on livestock grazing), plant community ecology and assessment methods, and arid land hydrology.

RGSC 620. Advanced Arid Land Plant-Herbivore Interactions

3 Credits

In depth discussion of seminal work dealing with plant- and animal-related factors that influence herbivory patterns in arid landscapes. Although ungulate herbivory is a central focus of the course, the role of plant defenses in deterring both vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores is discussed in detail.

RGSC 698. Special Research Programs

1-4 Credits (1-4)

Advanced individual investigations, either analytical or experimental. Maximum of 4 credits per semester. No more than 6 credits toward a degree. Consent of Instructor required.

RGSC 700. Doctoral Dissertation

15 Credits

Dissertation. Consent of Instructor required. Thesis/Dissertation Grading.

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Website: http://aces.nmsu.edu/academics/anrs/