HNRS-HONORS

HNRS 1110. Journeys of Discovery

1 Credit (1)

Weekly conversations among students and a faculty member; organized around a particular subject and a small selection of readings. The seminars illuminate the many paths of discovery explored by the New Mexico State University faculty.

Prerequisite(s): Honors eligible.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will comprehend and condense information to contribute to class discussions.
  2. Students will develop public speaking and presentation skills based on research conducted in and outside of class.
  3. Students will expand upon collaborative skills as both group presentations and group written reports.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 1115. Honors First Year Seminar

3 Credits (3)

This course is designed to introduce new first semester students to the life of the mind, the life of the University, and the principles that guide the NMSU University Honors Program. Combining critical thinking and experiential exploration, students will develop a personalized plan for success, both in and out of the classroom, consistent with the values of the Conroy Honors College and the mission of the University.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate critical thought about the nature of knowledge, learning, and student development in the contemporary University. Explain how key concepts and principles serve as the foundation for the Honors College mission and values. Create a plan for their experiences at NMSU, in and out of the classroom, that will maximize their academic achievement and personal success beyond graduation.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 1135G. Introduction to Biological Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

This course provides a basic introduction to the broad field of biological anthropology. The research interests of biological anthropologists include the history and development of modern evolutionary biology, molecular and population genetics, modern primates, the primate and human fossil record, and modern human biological diversity. This is an Honors version of ANTH 1135G. It is taught with ANTH 1135G with differentiated assignments. .

Corequisite: HNRS 1135L.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Summarize the basic principles of evolution and recognize how they apply to the human species. Recognize the biological and behavioral continuity of humans with all life, and especially other modern primate species. Identify ways in which the human species is biologically and behaviorally unique. Summarize fossil evidence for human evolution. Distinguish the major Paleolithic industries and outline the behavioral and cognitive changes indicated by the fossil and archeological evidence. Critically evaluate popular accounts of human variation and human evolution. Interpret modern human dilemmas (e.g., overpopulation, co-evolution of disease, and genetic engineering) from an evolutionary perspective. Discuss in class and analyze in writing scholarly arguments concerning course concepts.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 1135L. Introduction to Biological Anthropology Lab

1 Credit (1P)

This laboratory course expand on the topics covered in lecture course and uses scientific methods and principles to examine evidence for the process of evolution, the nature of heredity, human evolutionary history and family tree relationships, primate ecology and behavior, and modern human diversity. Hands-on experience with fossil and skeletal material will be an important part of the learning process. This is an Honors version of ANTH 1135L.

Corequisite: HNRS 1135G.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method. Employ principles of Mendelian genetics to determine genotype and phenotype probabilities, and calculate gene, genotype, and phenotype frequencies using the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium formula. Demonstrate an understanding of cell structure and functions. Use common lab and anthropometric equipment such as a compound microscope and calipers. Discuss primate evolution, and compare and contrast members of the Primate order in terms of structure, behavior, and phylogeny. Classify hominid species based upon selected traits such as anatomical changes associated with bipedalism, changes in the size and structure of the brain, and the development of culture. Locate and describe the major bones of the human skeleton, and identify characteristics of human skeletons or skulls such as gender, age, and ancestry. Discuss current research in genome analysis of various hominid popul ati ons.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2110G. The Present in the Past: Contemporary Issues and their Historical Roots

3 Credits (3)

This course will take today's concerns, trends, and customs and contextualize them in the past, explaining their historical origins and development. As an example, we will examine the history of celebrity and how celebrities -- from Lord Byron to the Kardashians' made an impact on their contemporaries and the broader society of their time. This reading- and writing-intensive course will help students develop skills related to critical thinking, logical argumentation, and written and oral communication.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze and critically interpret primary sources and understand how others might interpret and use the same material in different ways;
  2. Recognize and articulate the diversity of human experience across a range of historical periods and/or cultural perspectives.
  3. Understand how historical experiences and memories have shaped contemporary societies;
  4. Identify and understand the degree to which history has been used and misused in the past;
  5. Draw on historical and/or cultural perspectives to evaluate any or all of the following: contemporary problems/issues, contemporary modes of expression, and contemporary thought.
  6. Demonstrate improvement in their ability to read critically, think logically, and express themselves clearly in writing.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2111. Successful Fellowship Writing

1 Credit (1)

Provides scholars with hands-on skills to complete proposals for scholarships and fellowships, such as the Truman, Rhodes, Marshall, Goldwater, Udall, and others. Other skills include how to write resumes, develop general research skills, and find grant and foundation sources. For freshmen and sophomores. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Review of Prestigious International and National scholarships
  2. Best practices in preparing competitive proposals and applications
  3. Effective strategies for writing compelling Executive summaries, Resumes, and Personal Statements

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2114G. Music in Time and Space

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to all forms of Music. Through our auditory senses and intellectual faculties music is an ideal means for intelligent and humanistic examination of peoples and cultures, and for the enhancement of life. Types of music covered include classical, jazz, rock and roll, and world music. Music videos, live in-class performances, evening concerts, and lectures will be used as a basis for discussions and research. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze and critically interpret significant primary texts and/or works of art (this includes fine art, literature, music, theatre, and film).
  2. Compare art forms, modes of thought and expression, and processes across a range of historical periods and/or structures (such as political, geographic, social, cultural, religious, intellectual).
  3. Recognize and articulate the diversity of human experience across a range of historical periods and/or cultural perspectives.
  4. Draw on historical and/or cultural perspectives to evaluate all of the following: contemporary problems/issues, contemporary modes of expression, and contemporary thought

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2115G. Encounters with Art

3 Credits (3)

A multicultural examination of the principles and philosophies of the visual arts and the ideas expressed through them. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Articulate the relationship of art to the human experience
  2. Apply the vocabulary of art to critical writings and discussions
  3. Interpret art works within cultural, social, personal and historical contexts

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2116G. Earth, Time and Life

4 Credits (3+3P)

Covers how the earth's materials form, processes involved in changing the earth's configuration, and extent of people's dependence upon the earth's resources. Includes mineral and energy resources, development of landscapes, environmental problems, evolution of the earth and life forms. May be taken in place of GEOL 1110. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Gain a general understanding of geology and the geological processes that have been occurring throughout Earth's history.
  2. Learn about some of the common minerals and rocks that are the building blocks to geology and the rock cycle.
  3. Investigate the processes associated with each rock type (e.g., volcanoes, faults, depositional processes, etc.) and as well as potential geologic hazards (e.g., volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, flooding, etc.).
  4. Recognize and identify common minerals and rocks and understand the basic processes and conditions responsible for their formation and occurrence.
  5. Comprehensively understand how the internal and external parts of the Earth have functioned throughout geologic time.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2117G. The World of the Renaissance: Discovering the Modern

3 Credits (3)

An introduction to the literature and thought of Renaissance Europe. Humanism and the Reformation will be approached through the intensive study of major writers such as Petrarch, Machiavelli, Luther, Erasmus, Montaigne, and Shakespeare. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze and critically interpret significant primary texts and/or works of fine art, literature, philosophy, and theatre from the early modem period;
  2. Locate art forms, modes of thought and expression, and processes from the early modem period in historical and/or cultural context and compare them to those of other time periods;
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of how early modem historical and/or cultural perspectives and key
  4. technological developments contributed to the development of contemporary thought and modes of expression;
  5. Recognize and articulate the diversity of human experience across historical periods and/or cultural perspectives;
  6. Demonstrate skill in working with relevant secondary resources and research tools to develop a class

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2120G. Foundations of Western Culture

3 Credits (3)

Critical reading of seminal texts relating to the foundations of culture and values in Western civilization, from ancient Greece to about 1700. Focus on the development of concepts of nature, human nature, and the state. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will enhance abilities to quickly read, comprehend, and evaluate lengthy, complex texts to extract their fundamental arguments.
  2. Students will improve critical thinking by grappling with ethical issues about the rights of individuals versus societies.
  3. Students will use historical analysis to contextualize current social, political, geographic, and economic issues and how the foundations continue to affect contemporary society.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2130G. Shakespeare on Film

3 Credits (3)

How do Shakespeare's plays continue to speak to us through the medium of film? Written in a time of rapid social change,Shakespeare's plays invited audiences to think critically about the relationship between the self and others and to question conventions. Performances of Shakespeare have long been used to call out social injustice, from western anti-Semitism prior to World War II (The Merchant of Venice), to civil rights-era white supremacy in the US and apartheid in South African (Othello),and authoritarianism in the Arab Spring (Richard III). This course focuses on post-1980 Hollywood film versions of Shakespeare's plays and a few prior landmark adaptations around the world, examining how they use Shakespeare as a medium for debate and even a catalyst for social change.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate critical thinking by identifying issues and problems in the film adaptation of Shakespeare;
  2. 2 .Engage in intercultural reasoning and develop intercultural competence and historical consciousness in analyzing film adaptations from the US, Europe, and Asia;
  3. Engage with questions of personal and social responsibility as explored in Shakespeare's plays and modern film adaptations;
  4. Conduct effective research on a relevant topic, evaluating the validity and authority of secondary sources, synthesizing ideas, and drawing reasonable conclusions;
  5. 5 .Present independent research in collaboration with other student researchers and reflect on this teamwork experience

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2140G. Plato and the Discovery of Philosophy

3 Credits (3)

Examines arguments and theories found in the Platonic dialogues with a view to determining the nature and value of philosophy both from Plato's point of view and absolutely. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will evaluate a number of Plato’s dialogues to understand his doctrines and arguments.
  2. Students will use their understanding to further evaluate why his philosophies have remained influential in modern, Western society and beyond.
  3. Students will develop well-formulated, compelling arguments from philosophical texts.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2141G. Bamboo and Silk: The Fabric of Chinese Literature

3 Credits (3)

Introductory survey of traditional and modern Chinese prose and poetry in translation with emphasis on genre, theme, and social/historical context. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will acquire extensive knowledge of one of the world's oldest and richest literary traditions.
  2. Not incidentally, students will also gain knowledge of China's history and philosophical traditions.
  3. As this class is based on reading, writing, and discussion, students will hone their interpretive and
  4. expressive skills.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2145G. Celtic Literature

3 Credits (3)

This course provides an overview of the most important early literary works of the so-called Celtic nations, principally Ireland and Wales, from a literary and historical approach. This literature stems from the period 600-1200 and ends with the development of the Romances under influence from the French

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will learn the concept of the international folk tale,
  2. Students will learn about the history of the Celts
  3. Students will learn about the concept of Celtic nations' formed during the 19th Century.
  4. Students will enhance critical thinking skills.
  5. Students will enhance written and oral communication.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2160G. New Testament as Literature

3 Credits (3)

Literature of the New Testament examined from a literary perspective. Emphasis on translation history of the New Testament, generic features of gospel, epistle and apocalypse, precedent literary models, problems of authorship, classification of New Testament texts. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will hone critical thinking skills byanalyzing arguments and controversies surrounding the roots of Christianity.
  2. Students will discern and discuss the viability of both literary and historical sources with debated authorship, dating, and interdependency.
  3. Students will practice interpersonal navigation and maintaining an academic environment of respect as they discuss a number of topics that can be considered controversial or subjective.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2161G. Window of Humanity

3 Credits (3)

Anthropology is the most humanistic of the sciences, and the most scientific of the humanities. This course will use anthropological perspectives to examine the human experience from our earliest origins, through the experiences of contemporary societies. We will gain insights into the influence of both culture and biology on shaping our shared human universals, and on the many ways in which human groups are diverse. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Explain the concepts that define Anthropology (along with its subfields) as a specific research discipline.
  2. Possess a growing vocabulary for anthropology, cultural study, ethnographic research and writing that will empower them as they continue with their degrees and professional careers.
  3. Recognize how Anthropological concepts, terms, and methods are valuable for present-day concerns and how these tools can be used to engage life and the world at large.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2165. Humanities in the 21st Century

3 Credits (3)

An exploration of the humanities, of their intrinsic and extrinsic values, and of the skills and habits of mind they cultivate.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Articulate what the humanities are and what role they have played in education throughout the ages
  2. Articulate examples of the intrinsic value of the humanities
  3. Articulate the skills and habits of thought in at least one chosen discipline in the humanities
  4. Articulate common misconceptions about university majors and reframe the common misconceptions
  5. Create at least three employment scenarios based on your skills and interests
  6. Exercise divergent thinking with regards to future career paths

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2170G. The Human Mind

3 Credits (3)

The primary course objective is to develop an appreciation of the variety and complexity of problems that are solved by the human mind. The course explores how problems are solved by a combined computational analysis (computational theory of mind), and evolutionary (evolution by natural selection) perspective. The mind is what the brain does (i.e. information processing) and the brain is a computational device that is a product of evolution by natural selection. Note that this is not a neuroscience course, we will be focusing on the mind (what the brain does) rather than on the brain. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Enhance written and oral communication
  2. Stimulate critical thinking and learn to weigh scientific evidence
  3. Challenge students to make ethical decisions and promote personal and social responsibility

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2171G. The Worlds of Arthur

3 Credits (3)

Arthurian texts and traditions from medieval chronicles to contemporary literature. Emphasis on both the continuities of the Arthurian tradition and the diversity of genres, media, and cultures that have given expression to the legend. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will examine how texts and narratives, even with fictional implications, still held psychological, social, cultural, and religious sway within developed societies throughout history.
  2. Students will synthesize information from an array of both primary and secondary sources to measure the cultural significance King Arthur holds in contemporary societies.
  3. Students will extrapolate how a society’s values at any point in history will affect the transference of mythos, just as a myth transmits the values of that society.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2172G. Archaeology: Search for the Past

3 Credits (3)

A critical evaluation of various approaches to understanding prehistory and history. The methods and theories of legitimate archaeology are contrasted with fantastic claims that invoke extraterrestrials, global catastrophes, transoceanic voyages, and extra-sensory perception. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify, describe, and explain how human lifeways changed in diverse communities in different parts of the globe.
  2. Select and use relevant archaeological evidence to articulate how people's beliefs and values were influenced by politics, geography, economics, culture, biology, history, and social institutions in the past.
  3. Analyze the significance of archaeological artifacts in context and explain their relevance to understanding relations among individuals, their society, and the environment.
  4. Evaluate how practices in research, conservation, and tourism to archaeological sites promote ethical stewardship of non-renewable archaeological resources.
  5. Design a study tour to archaeological sites that will address a key question or argument in prehistory and promote historic/archaeological preservation.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2173G. Middle Ages

3 Credits (3)

Intensive, interdisciplinary introduction to the thought and culture of medieval Europe. Core texts will include works by St. Augustine, Marie de France, and Dante, as well as anonymous works such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, all supplemented by study of medieval art, architecture, philosophy, and social history. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will hone critical reading skills as they read through a wealth of texts, by prioritizing attention to details and how it affects the overall narrative.
  2. Students will recognize how the social, religious, and political environments of the medieval era shaped contemporary society in affected regions beyond Europe.
  3. Students will employ comparative analysis skills as they examine how Islamic culture might have influenced poetry and music in medieval Europe.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2174G. American Politics in a Changing World

3 Credits (3)

American politics and policies examined from a historical and global perspective. Philosophical underpinnings of American national government, the structure of government based on that philosophy, and the practical implications of both the philosophical and structural base. How American government influences and is influenced by the world community. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will enhance their understanding of the operation of major American political institutions and processes.
  2. Students will investigate how the uniquely American form of constitutional governance has sought to adapt to changing historical and cultural conditions.
  3. Students will practice interpersonal navigation and maintaining an academic environment of respect as they discuss a number of topics that can be considered controversial or subjective.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2175G. Introduction to Communications Honors

3 Credits (3)

Study and practice of interpersonal, small group, and presentational skills essential to effective social, business, and professional interaction. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze and evaluate oral and written communication in terms of situation, audience, purpose, aesthetics, and diverse points of view.
  2. Express a primary purpose in a compelling statement and order supporting points logically and convincingly.
  3. Use effective rhetorical strategies to persuade, inform and engage.
  4. Employ writing and/or speaking processes such as planning, collaborating, organizing, composing, revising editing to create presentations using correct diction, syntax, grammar and mechanics.
  5. Integrate research correctly and ethically from credible sources to support the primary purpose of a communication.
  6. Engage in reasoned civil discourse while recognizing the distinctions among opinions, facts, and inferences.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2176. Acting for Everyone

3 Credits (3)

To provide fundamental training in acting techniques, including stage voice and movement, improvisation, ensemble building, characterization, emotion exploration and basic performance analysis. The course will provide a correlation between theatre skills and everyday "life" skills and seek to encourage an appreciation for the art of theatre.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Improve effectiveness of oral communication.
  2. Enhance creativity and appreciation of theatre.
  3. Build confidence and expressiveness.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2178G. Theatre: Beginnings to Broadway

3 Credits (3)

Intercultural and historical overview of live theatre production and performance, including history, literature and professionals. Students attend and report on stage productions. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Distinguish and differentiate the characteristics of theatre from other art forms.
  2. Describe the major components of a theatrical event.
  3. Describe the functions of various theatre personnel.
  4. Define specific terms relating to the study of theatre.
  5. List and describe the parts of a play.
  6. Define the different parts of plot.
  7. Critique plays
  8. Describe the characteristics of theatre in the different periods of history.
  9. Develop an appreciation for theatre as an art form and a reflection of society

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2180G. Citizen and State Great Political Issues

3 Credits (3)

The fundamental questions of politics: why and how political societies are organized, what values they express, and how well they satisfy those normative goals and the differing conceptions of citizenship, representation, and freedom. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will investigate the fluid state of American politics by discerning the decisions and policies of a selection of presidents.
  2. Students will investigate the complex operations behind a representative democracy.
  3. Students will examine how the sociopolitical environment surrounding a president influences his policies, and how a president’s policies affect the broader society.
  4. Students will assess and measure how politics can be affected by active and engaged citizens

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2185G. Democracies, Despots and Daily Life

3 Credits (3)

This course will offer students the chance to read firsthand accounts of ordinary citizens' lives under different political systems,from the earliest age to the present day. This reading- and writing-intensive course will help students develop skills related to critical thinking, logical argumentation, and written and oral communication.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze and critically interpret primary sources and understand how others might interpret and use the same material in different ways;
  2. Recognize and articulate the diversity of human experience across a range of historical periods and/or cultural perspectives.
  3. Understand how historical experiences and memories have shaped contemporary societies;
  4. Identify and understand the degree to which history has been used and misused in the past;
  5. Draw on historical and/or cultural perspectives to evaluate any or all of the following: contemporary problems/issues, contemporary modes of expression, and contemporary thought.
  6. Demonstrate improvement in their ability to read critically, think logically, and express themselves clearly in writing.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2190G. Claiming a Multiracial Past

3 Credits (3)

Survey of history of the United States in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with an emphasis on multicultural social and cultural history. Focus on understanding American history from the point of view of dispossessed, impoverished, and disenfranchised Americans who have fought to claim both their rights as Americans and American past. 5 or higher

Prerequisite(s): An ACT score of 26 or higher; or a combination of an ACT score of 24-25 with a High School GPA of 3.75; or a NMSU cummulative GPA of 3.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will contextualize the current state of American “being” by focusing on the multicultural-social and cultural history of the U.S. in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
  2. Students will hone public speaking and presentation skills through classroom discussions and activities.
  3. Students will practice interpersonal navigation and maintaining an academic environment of respect as they discuss a number of topics that can be considered controversial or subjective.

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 2996. Special Topics

1-3 Credits (1-3)

Special course offerings, with unique titles listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

View Learning Outcomes

HNRS 304V. Dilemmas of War and Peace

3 Credits (3)

A multi-disciplinary introduction to war, peace, and world order studies. The origins of war and the foundations of peace are explored in the context of a rapidly changing world order.

HNRS 305V. Is Fake News Real: Journalism, Community, and Mass Communications

3 Credits (3)

Overview of how technology, money, politics, and human desire have changed journalism since 1963. Explores role of journalism in news dissemination, influencing opinion, and political behavior. Course includes guest lectures from regional journalists and media experts.

HNRS 306V. Science, Ethics and Society

3 Credits (3)

Investigation of the ethical issues related to scientific investigation and the ethical implications of scientific discoveries for society. Emphasis on discussion of case studies about specific ethical issues in science, and readings by both scientists and non-scientists.

HNRS 313. Research and Writing

3 Credits (3)

Workshop format designed to prepare students for research and writing associated with production of an honors thesis or a major research assignment. Does not count for general education or honors certification credit.

HNRS 314. Successful Fellowship Writing

1 Credit (1)

Provides scholars with hands-on skills to complete proposals for scholarships and fellowships, such as the Truman, Rhodes, Marshall, Goldwater, Udall, and others. Other skills include how to write resumes, develop general research skills, and find grant and foundation sources.

HNRS 317V. Cultural Lessons on Nazism

3 Credits (3)

Examination of the values and cultural manifestations of fascism in the period 1918-45 with multidisciplinary emphasis on European forms of fascism, particularly German Nazism. Course features a survey of literary, dramatic, poetic, cinematic, and artistic treatments of human behavior leading up to fascism, living under fascist rule, and coming to grips with the consequences of war and genocide.

HNRS 318V. The World of Cinema

3 Credits (3)

Appreciation of the art of motion pictures as world-wide medium specific to national cultures. Refinement of cinematic literacy and critical viewing skills. Historical and thematic overview emphasizes collaborative nature of medium in various genres from 1895 to present. Selected films from different periods and different countries. Substantial library research projects.

HNRS 321V. Agriculture in an Interconnected World

3 Credits (3)

Study of the impact of agriculture on cultural and social systems, with special emphasis on twentieth century urban development.

HNRS 324V. Science and the Arts: Theatre and Story

3 Credits (3)

This course examines present day relations between the sciences and the representation and communication of science, especially in connection with theatre, narrative fiction, and autobiography. Crosslisted with: THEA 329.

HNRS 326V. Art and Mythology

3 Credits (3)

Mythological figures, past and present, in the visual arts. Through iconographical studies (attributes and symbols), trace the development of visual traditions that evolved from the literary sources of classical Mediterranean mythology.

HNRS 328V. Rock History: 20th Century Popular Music

3 Credits (3)

Evolution of popular music in the 20th Century. Examines the history of popular music conventions, influences, and breakthroughs through the 20th Century. Topics include the originations of major music styles and their evolution as cultivated by key artists, scientific advancements, and sociopolitical change, contextualized within the contemporaneous history. Of particular concern are the influences of groundbreaking artists; the effect of evolving playback electronics, recording devices, and musical instruments; and the interplay between music and economic depression, war, civil rights, sexual revolution, and other sociopolitical events.

HNRS 335V. Legal Issues in Modern Society

3 Credits (3)

Case study approach to contemporary legal problems involving environment, consumer protection, international law, corporate responsibility.

HNRS 336V. Testimonios from the Borderlands

3 Credits (3)

This course is about the testimonies (testimonios) and autobiographical writings about and by Latinas in the United States. Life stories are told through many forms: "testimonios," memoirs, autobiographies and autobiographical fiction, oral histories and short stories, poetry and poetic prose pieces, essays, and audio-stories. The course focuses on testimonios as method, epistemology, and pedagogy. Among the questions we will examine will be those concerning knowledge production, sexual politics, the mind-body-spirit connection, voice, representation, and truth. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

HNRS 340V. Indian Law and Policy

3 Credits (3)

Explores the principles, doctrines, and texts governing the legal relations between the United States and Indian tribes, the history of federal Indian law and policy, tribal property, treaty rights and sovereignty, congressional plenary power, the trust doctrine, jurisdiction in Indian country, and tribal government. Topic specifically examined in the course include tribal lawmaking powers, gaming and economic development in Indian country, protection of Indian religious rights and cultural property, water rights, fishing, hunting and other treaty-based rights.

HNRS 341V. The Old Testament as Literature

3 Credits (3)

Old Testament surveys a portion of the thirty-nine canonical books of the Old Testament from a literary approach, centered on the so-called historical-critical method that developed in the 19th C under such figures as Julius Wellhausen. Higher criticism of the texts, their sources, authorship, dating and interdependency has led to deepened insights as well as scholarly conflict. In addition, we will examine several apocryphal books that have continuing importance in our understanding of Old Testament. We will read the Old Testament along with an introduction and some supplementary materials.

HNRS 347V. World Dance

3 Credits (3)

Examination of dance forms from a cross-cultural perspective, focusing on the role of dance in different cultures around the globe. Same as DANC 3510V with differential assignments for Honors students.

HNRS 348V. Comparative Mythology: Myth, Ritual, and the Life Cycle

3 Credits (3)

Exploration of the central myths of several religious traditions and investigation of how each, through ritual, has given meaning to key moments in the journey of the individual through life.

HNRS 349V. Islam and the West: Cultural Contacts, Conflicts, and Exchanges

3 Credits (3)

This course examines interactions, encounters and cross-fertilization between the Islamic world and the West from the 7th -21st century. It begins with the origins of Islam and its relationship to Judaism and Christianity and ends in the post 9/11 present, an era some characterize as dominated by a "clash of civilizations."

HNRS 353V. Justice without Prejudice

3 Credits (3)

Exploration of central questions about race, ethnicity, and justice. Students will learn to argue persuasively from different perspectives, both orally and in writing.

HNRS 362V. Native American Philosophy and Spirituality

3 Credits (3)

Survey of philosophical traditions of Indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere. This course examines various forms of spiritual expression which encompasses art, dance, music, political/social activism, and the relationship to land. This course looks at present-day spiritual issues and on-going practices in Native America.

HNRS 370V. Design: The Creative Act

3 Credits (3)

Explores the nature of design and what it means to design in various diverse media. Included are creative efforts in writing, art, music, and technology. Commonalities and differences are considered.

HNRS 371V. Paris: Beyond the Eiffel Tower

3 Credits (3+3P)

This interdisciplinary course focues on the evolution of the city of Paris from its earliest beginnings in the fifth century to modern times. Through the use of histroical, political, sociological and artistic texts and films, we will explore the various narratives which emerge from the built environment of Paris as well as its mythic status as the "City of Light and Romance" and "Capital of Revolution., Modernity and Art."

HNRS 374V. The European City: History and Culture

3 Credits (3)

Historical overview of development, growth, and culture of European cities.

HNRS 378V. Technology and Policy

3 Credits (3)

Study of the processes through which society sets goals for science and technology, of the allocation of resources needed to achieve these goals, and of the obligations and conflicts that develop as the goals are realized. International comparisons of public policies.

HNRS 379V. Literature as Film

3 Credits (3)

Considers the various results of literary adaptations to the screen. Participants will read literary texts written or translated into English and watch films from various countries as illustrations of this process.

HNRS 381V. Economic Development of Latin America

3 Credits (3)

Economic analysis of problems related to development in Latin America, including the agrarian problem, debt and austerity programs, industrialization, inflation and unemployment, the drug trade, U.S.-Latin American relations, development strategies. Also individual counties' problems.

Prerequisite(s): 3.2 cumulative GPA.

HNRS 384V. Ethical Decisions in Organizations

3 Credits (3)

Examines ethical decisions in business, non-profit, and governmental organizations from a managerial perspective. Topics include ethical principles, recognition and application of principle-based ethics, stakeholders in ethical decisions, and analysis of the consistency between organizational decisions and ethical principles.

HNRS 387V. Comparative Perspectives on Women

3 Credits (3)

The history, antecedents, and consequences of sex and gender systems around the world from the perspective of sociology, anthropology, and psychology.

HNRS 388V. Leadership and Society

3 Credits (3)

Exploration of the multifaceted nature of leadership in modern society through readings and seminar discussion.

HNRS 390V. Worlds of Buddhism

3 Credits (3)

This course is an introduction to Buddhism and its contribution to the formation of (East) Asian cultures. It provides students with Buddhist and (East) Asian “case studies” - i.e., examples of the ways in which Buddhism has influenced, and has been influenced by, the region’s various cultural and social milieus over time. The course is designed to offer opportunities to critically reflect on Buddhism as a transformative philosophical, cultural and individual system. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

HNRS 394V. Southwestern and Border Literature

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to the culturally diverse literature of the American Southwest and borderlands region. Class analyzes evolution of the Southwest concept and considers degree to which the existence of a borderlands culture is manifest in literature.

Prerequisite: honors eligibility.

HNRS 400. Honors Thesis

3 Credits (3)

Independent-study research and writing project to be carried out under the supervision of a faculty member.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

HNRS 410. Honors Internship

3-6 Credits

Assignments in departments to be supervised by faculty in the area. A cumulative 3.5 GPA is required. May be repeated up to 12 credits. Consent of Instructor required.

HNRS 411V. Great Theorems: The Art of Mathematics

3 Credits (3)

Same as MATH 411V.

HNRS 412. Medical College Admission Test Preparation

3 Credits (3)

This course prepares students to optimize their performance on the Medical College Admission Test that is required for admission to medical schools throughout North America. This course should be taken only after completing requisite courses in biology, chemistry and biochemistry, physics, health sciences, and appropriate social science electives.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of basic courses in STEM, health sciences and behavioral sciences.

HNRS 413. Medical Shadowing

1-3 Credits (1-3)

For students who are shadowing medical professionals this course will provide academic credit for completion of this experience. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of 57 credits, of any subject.

HNRS 420. Independent Studies

1-3 Credits

Directed, individual studies and projects.

Prerequisites: consent of instructor and honors eligibility.

HNRS 421. Special Topics

1-3 Credits

Special course offerings, with specific titles listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

HNRS 422. Directed Research

3 Credits (3)

Individual research projects supervised by faculty advisers. Consent of instructor required.

HNRS 425V. Magic and Witchcraft in Medieval and Renaissance

3 Credits (3)

Examines the history of popular and scientific beliefs about magic and witchcraft in medieval and early modern Europe. Topics include the origins of the occult sciences in the West, Arabic sources of medieval magic, the occult sciences in scholasticism, witchcraft and medieval theology, the witch hunts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and the decline of belief in magic and witchcraft in the seventeenth century. Of particular concern are the boundaries that defined and separated magic, science, and religion in western thought from late antiquity through the Scientific Revolution. Same as HIST 425 with differential assignments for HNRS 425V students. Crosslisted with: HIST 425.

HNRS 450V. The Sundt Honors Seminar

3 Credits (3)

The Sundt Honors Seminar is a unique, experience-based, interdisciplinary seminar developed and taught by the holder of the Sundt Honors Professorship for the year. The subject of the course will vary according to the discipline of the Sundt Professor. The course may include a travel experience related to the seminar topic, hosting of outside specialists, or other unique activity. Open to students by application. Students selected for the course are named Sundt Scholars.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1110G or equivalent.

HNRS 521. Special Topics

3 Credits (3)

Graduate level to be cross-listed with HNRS 421 Special Topics at the undergraduate level.