ENGL-ENGLISH

ENGL 1105M. Intermediate ESL Composition and Grammar Review

3 Credits (3)

Development of fluent academic writing skills, with an emphasis on grammar review for editing purposes. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only.

Prerequisite(s): Placement based on English language screening test, and either a minimum TOEFL score of 500 or consent of instructor.

ENGL 1110G. Composition I

4 Credits (4)

In this course, students will read, write, and think about a variety of issues and texts.They will develop reading and writing skills that will help with the writing required in their fields of study and other personal and professional contexts. Students will learn to analyze rhetorical situations in terms of audience, contexts, purpose, mediums, and technologies and apply this knowledge to their reading and writing. They will also gain an understanding of how writing and other modes of communication work together for rhetorical purposes. Students will learn to analyze the rhetorical context of any writing task and compose with purpose, audience, and genre in mind. Students will reflect on their own writing processes, learn to workshop drafts with other writers,and practice techniques for writing, revising, and editing.

Prerequisite: ACT standard score in English of 16 or higher, or an Accuplacer score 250 or higher, or an SAT score of 400 or higher or CCDE 1110 N.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze communication through reading and writing skills.
  2. Employ writing processes such as planning, organizing, composing, and revising.
  3. Express a primary purpose and organize supporting points logically.
  4. Use and document research evidence appropriate for college-level writing.
  5. Employ academic writing styles appropriate for different genres and audiences.
  6. Identify and correct grammatical and mechanical errorsin their writing

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ENGL 1110H. Composition I Honors

4 Credits (4)

In this course, students will read, write, and think about a variety of issues and texts.They will develop reading and writing skills that will help with the writing required in their fields of study and other personal and professional contexts. Students will learn to analyze rhetorical situations in terms of audience, contexts, purpose, mediums, and technologies and apply this knowledge to their reading and writing. They will also gain an understanding of how writing and other modes of communication work together for rhetorical purposes. Students will learn to analyze the rhetorical context of any writing task and compose with purpose, audience, and genre in mind. Students will reflect on their own writing processes, learn to workshop drafts with other writers,and practice techniques for writing, revising, and editing. Individualized assignments and independent study.

Prerequisite: ACT standard English score of 25 or higher, or an SAT score of 550 or higher.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze communication through reading and writing skills.
  2. Employ writing processes such as planning, organizing, composing, and revising.
  3. Express a primary purpose and organize supporting points logically.
  4. Use and document research evidence appropriate for college-level writing.
  5. Employ academic writing styles appropriate for different genres and audiences.
  6. Identify and correct grammatical and mechanical errors in their writing.

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ENGL 1110M. Composition I Multilingual

4 Credits (4)

In this course, students will read, write, and think about a variety of issues and texts.They will develop reading and writing skills that will help with the writing required in their fields of study and other personal and professional contexts. Students will learn to analyze rhetorical situations in terms of audience, contexts, purpose, mediums, and technologies and apply this knowledge to their reading and writing. They will also gain an understanding of how writing and other modes of communication work together for rhetorical purposes. Students will learn to analyze the rhetorical context of any writing task and compose with purpose, audience, and genre in mind. Students will reflect on their own writing processes, learn to workshop drafts with other writers,and practice techniques for writing, revising, and editing. For international and multilingual students. Your instructor and classmates will serve as your readers and will give you helpful and constructive criticism, which will in turn assist you in becoming a more fluent and engaging communicator in English. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only.

Prerequisite(s): CBT/PB score of 500, or IBT score of 61, or SPCD 110, or consent of instructor.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze communication through reading and writing skills.
  2. Employ writing processes such as planning, organizing, composing, and revising.
  3. Express a primary purpose and organize supporting points logically.
  4. Use and document research evidence appropriate for college-level writing.
  5. Employ academic writing styles appropriate for different genres and audiences.
  6. Identify and correct grammatical and mechanical errors in their writing.

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ENGL 1120. Composition II

2 Credits (2)

In this course, students will explore argument in multiple genres. Research and writing practices emphasize summary, analysis, evaluation, and integration of secondary sources. Students will analyze rhetorical situations in terms of audience, contexts, purpose, mediums, and technologies and apply this knowledge to their reading, writing, and research. Students will sharpen their understanding of how writing and other modes of communication work together for rhetorical purposes. The emphasis of this course will be on research methods.

Prerequisite: successful completion of ENGL 1110G or ENGL 1110H or ENGL 1110M.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze the rhetorical situation for purpose, main ideas, support, audience, and organizational strategies in a variety of genres.
  2. Employ writing processes such as planning, organizing, composing, and revising.
  3. Use a variety of research methods to gather appropriate, credible information.
  4. Evaluate sources, claims, and evidence for their relevance, credibility, and purpose.
  5. Quote, paraphrase, and summarize sources ethically, citing and documenting them appropriately.
  6. Integrate information from sources to effectively support claims as well as other purposes (to provide background information, evidence/examples, illustrate an alternative view, etc.).
  7. Use an appropriate voice (including syntax and word choice).

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ENGL 1410G. Introduction to Literature

3 Credits (3)

In this course, students will examine a variety of literary genres, including fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will identify common literary elements in each genre, understanding how specific elements influence meaning.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify, define, and understand basic literary conventions and themes in fiction, poetry and drama.
  2. Write reasonable, well-supported analyses of literature that ethically integrate evidence from texts

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ENGL 2130G. Advanced Composition

3 Credits (3)

This course is for students who are striving for fluency, maturity, clarity and significance in their writing. It is an intermediate writing course that builds on and refines writing skills acquired in previous courses. It focuses on non-fiction writing for the professions, business, science, technical fields, academe and/or the popular press. Short works of master writers are studied for ideas, styleand structure.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will examine and apply different writing styles and modes used by masters of personal essay and keep a reading response journal of assigned readings as demonstrated by scoring a 70% in faculty designed assignments.
  2. Students will develop a sense of audience by discussing their papers with each other in small groups during class or by reading each other’s papers and participating in positive, helpful peer reviews as demonstrated by scoring a 70% in faculty designed assignments.

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ENGL 2210G. Professional & Technical Communication

3 Credits (3)

Professional and Technical Communication will introduce students to the different types of documents and correspondence that they will create in their professional careers. This course emphasizes the importance of audience, document design, and the use of technology in designing, developing, and delivering documents.This course will provide students with experience in professional correspondence and communicating technical information to a non-technical audience.

Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in ENGL 1110G or ENGL 1110H or ENGL 1110M.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Choose professional communication appropriate for audiences and situations.
  2. Write in different genres of professional communication.
  3. Identify the purpose of a work-related communication and assess the audiences' informationa
  4. l needs and organizational constraints.
  5. Employ appropriate design/visuals to support and enhance various texts.
  6. Demonstrate effective collaboration and presentation skills.
  7. Integrate research and information from credible sources into professional communication

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ENGL 2210H. Professional and Technical Communication Honors

3 Credits (3)

Professional and Technical Communication writing for Crimson Scholars/Honors students will introduce students to the different types of documents and correspondence that they will create in their professional careers. This course emphasizes the importance of audience, document design, and the use of technology in designing, developing, and delivering documents. This course will provide students with experience in professional correspondence and communicating technical information to a non-technical audience. 3.5 GPA is also required. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only.

Prerequisite(s): grade of C- or better in ENGL 1110G or the equivalent; approval of the honors college.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Choose professional communication appropriate for audiences and situations.
  2. Write in different genres of professional communication.
  3. Identify the purpose of a work-related communication and assess the audiences' informational needs and organizational constraints.
  4. Employ appropriate design/visuals to support and enhance various texts.
  5. Demonstrate effective collaboration and presentation skills.
  6. Integrate research and information from credible sources into professional communication.

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ENGL 2210M. Professional and Technical Communication for Multilingual Students

3 Credits (3)

Professional and Technical Communication will introduce students to the different types of documents and correspondence that they will create in their professional careers. This course emphasizes the importance of audience, document design, and the use of technology in designing, developing, and delivering documents. This course will provide students with experience in professional correspondence and communicating technical information to a non-technical audience. NMSU specific description: In this course, students will explore the unique advantages and challenges of being multilingual writers. This course is designed for international and domestic multilingual students.

Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in ENGL 1110G or ENGL 1110H or ENGL 1110M.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Choose professional communication appropriate for audiences and situations.
  2. Write in different genres of professional communication.
  3. Identify the purpose of a work-related communication and assess the audiences' informational needs and organizational constraints. Employ appropriate design/visuals to support and enhance various texts.
  4. Demonstrate effective collaboration and presentation skills.
  5. Integrate research and information from credible sources into professional communication.

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ENGL 2215G. Advanced Technical and Professional Communication

3 Credits (3)

Theory and practice of writing in technical and professional fields, individualized to each student s field. Emphasizes efficient writing processes and effective written products. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only.

Prerequisite(s): Junior or above standing, or consent of instructor.

Learning Outcomes
  1. To complicate the definition of "technical and scientific communication" and its relationship(s) to studying and practicing "rhetoric."
  2. To complicate our relationship to concepts like "science", "knowledge, "objectivity," neutrality, "clarity," etc.
  3. To use a community-based approach to study and practice technical and scientific documents within various discourse communities.
  4. To study and practice different genres (i.e. memos, letters, e-mails, reports, proposals, and instruction sets) attending to issues of audience and purpose within discourse communities.
  5. To practice some mindful reading strategies that allow you to attend to the use of language and its material and discursive effects in different situations.
  6. To examine the material effects of producing, circulating, and consuming technical and scientific texts on the bodies of people within different contexts.
  7. To complicate our understanding of "ethics," "responsibility," and "accountability" toward ourselves and others.
  8. To work collaboratively and individually to research, to analyze, and to write about public debates regarding the conduct of science and technology.
  9. To understand and use basic principles of document design attending to issues of usability and accessibility.
  10. 1 To articulate the relationship between technical and scientific communication and issues of inclusion and social justice in the world.

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ENGL 2221G. Writing in the Humanities and Social Science

3 Credits (3)

Theory and practice in interpreting texts from various disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Strategies for researching, evaluating, constructing, and writing researched arguments. Course subtitled in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or better in ENGL 1110G or ENGL 1110H, or ENGL 1110M.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop the ability to interpret and respond to humanities and social sciences texts
  2. Analyze and evaluate cultural artifacts such as texts, images, and practices as a means of academic inquiry
  3. Critique arguments offered in the readings to determine the underlying methodology as well as underlying values
  4. Construct a rhetorical argument with evidence appropriate for an explicit audience and purpose
  5. Use written, visual, or oral strategies to persuade, inform, or engage, considering situation, audience, purpose, aesthetics, and diverse points of view
  6. Practice effective research strategies, and integrate research correctly and ethically from credible sources
  7. Understand and apply components of the writing process such as planning, collaborating, organizing, composing, revising, and editing

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ENGL 2280. History of Argument

3 Credits (3)

Investigates the major figures and movements in rhetoric from the classical period to modern rhetorical theory, examining relations between rhetorical teaching and practice, culture, epistemology, and ideology. Main campus only. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1110G, or ENGL 1110GH, or ENGL 1110M

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand how rhetoric, argument, and persuasion work. Become familiar with the key terms and various contexts in which rhetoric, argument, and persuasion function and the contingencies that influence their use and effectiveness;
  2. be familiar with the broad history and major figures of western rhetoric;
  3. apply a number of approaches used to analyze and construct/deconstruct rhetorical arguments, including (but not limited to) Aristotelian appeals and commonplaces, stasis theory, toulmin analysis, pentadic/dramatistic analysis, fallacy analysis, and rogerian analysis;
  4. complete an analysis as well as design and present a project regarding a contemporary issue or concern about which you feel deep passion and commitment; and
  5. Improve general critical thinking and communication skills, both oral and written.

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ENGL 2310G. Introduction to Creative Writing

3 Credits (3)

This course will introduce students to the basic elements of creative writing, including short fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Students will read and study published works as models, but the focus of this "workshop" course is on students revising and reflecting on their own writing. Throughout this course, students will be expected to read poetry, fiction, and nonfiction closely, and analyze the craft features employed. They will be expected to write frequently in each of these genres.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1110G or ENGL 1110H or ENGL 1110M.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Participate in a constructive conversation and community about creative writing.
  2. Read and critically engage with a variety of texts.
  3. Compose creative works in various genres of creative writing.
  4. Provide respectful, honest, and critical feedback to peers about their work.
  5. Revise creative work based on peer feedback and critique.
  6. Develop thoughtful workshop reflection on students' own writing and writing process.
  7. Evaluate and engage with publication process.

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ENGL 2381. Script Development and Storyboarding

3 Credits (3)

Examines effective writing principles for creating storyboards that communicate the overall picture of a project, timing, scene complexity, emotion and resource requirements. Crosslisted with: FDMA 2381.

Learning Outcomes
  1. develop a story idea into a complete storyboard
  2. describe and visualize the creative aspects of a media project from conception to completion
  3. write a scene in the professional script format
  4. deliver a professional verbal and visual presentation of a story idea to an audience
  5. the ability to conceive, illustrate and plan a visual project
  6. proficiency in oral, written, and visual communication via storyboarding, script writing and verbal
  7. presentations

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ENGL 2382. Narrative: Principles of Story Across the Media

3 Credits (3)

Examines the various strategies of written and visual storytelling, narrative structure and its principal components (plot, theme, character, imagery, symbolism, point of view) with an attempt to connect them to elements of contemporary forms of media expression, including screenwriting, playwriting, writing for documentaries and animation, etc. Crosslisted with: FDMA 2382

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify use the building blocks of storytelling: plot, theme, character, imagery,
  2. Symbolism and point of view
  3. Develop these building blocks into a cohesive narrative within a written document
  4. Effectively communicate in different written formats
  5. Create design documents for varied genres of media: narrative short, documentary,
  6. Animation, commercial/industrial video, computer game
  7. Describe how a written narrative can be translated into a visual medium

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ENGL 2520G. Film as Literature

3 Credits (3+3P)

The purpose of this course is to teach students how to analyze film as a visual text. Students will learn to analyze films, film techniques, eras, and genres. Students will also identify significant trends and developments in film-making, examining the ways in which film reflects and creates cultural trends and values.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop an understanding of the cultural, historical, and technical contexts for various films.
  2. Identify, define, and analyze basic film techniques used in different genres and time periods.
  3. Analyze how film uses literature by studying different sources of adaptation.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of film in its various aspects by writing film analysis, reviews, and/or other projects.

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ENGL 2521. The Bible as Literature

3 Credits (3)

Develops informed readings of Hebrew and Christian scriptures. Emphasizes understanding Biblical literary forms, techniques, themes; historical, cultural contexts for interpretation; authorship, composition, audience for individual books; development of Biblical canon.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop and articulate historically informed and textually supported arguments regarding the form and meaning of biblical texts
  2. Express arguments and explication in clear, organized,
  3. Understand the Jewish and Christian scriptures as cultural artifacts, using some fundamental techniques of literary analysis and interpretation, especially: thematic interpretation, stylistic analysis, narrative analysis, poetics, and the rhetorical analysis of figurative language.
  4. Use socio-historically informed interpretive methods focused on these fundamental contextual questions : 1) who probably wrote and edited these texts, 2) why and how they most likely did so, 3) how their earliest audiences probably responded to them, and 4) why and how they were later combined to form the canonical Jewish and Christian bibles read today.
  5. Know in detail substantial selections of representative, influential, and historically informative biblical texts
  6. Distinguish literary critical and historical analysis of the Bible from those based on faith, tradition, authority, and theology
  7. Recognize, understand, and analyze the forms, genres, and techniques used by biblical authors
  8. Become familiar with and be able to use essential knowledge of the historical, cultural, and geographical contexts of Biblical writing
  9. Learn how evaluate texts as historical documents, as well as how doing so relates to and differs from literary critical analysis and interpretation
  10. 1 Become familiar with common and influential scholarly, critical, and aesthetic ways of reading Biblical texts from a contemporary perspective
  11. 1 Understand the cultural influence of the Bible and its relevance for other areas of scholarly and artistic work

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ENGL 2610. American Literature I

3 Credits (3)

This course surveys American literature from the colonial period to the mid-nineteenth century. This course provides students with the contexts and documents necessary to understand the origins of American Literature and the aesthetic, cultural, and ideological debates central to early American culture.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Recognize the traditions of American literature and their connection to issues of culture, race, class, and gender.
  2. Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of major works by American authors.
  3. Explore the various influences and sources of American literature.
  4. Apply effective analytic and interpretive strategies to American literary works using academic conventions of citation and style.

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ENGL 2620. American Literature II

3 Credits (3)

This course surveys American literature from the mid-nineteenth-century to the contemporary period. This course provides students with the contexts and documents necessary to understand American literature and the aesthetic, cultural, and ideological debates central to American culture.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Recognize the traditions of American literature and their connection to issues of culture, race, class, and gender.
  2. Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of major works by American authors.
  3. Explore the various influences and sources of American literature.
  4. Apply effective analytic and interpretive strategies to American literary works using academic
  5. conventions of citation and style.

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ENGL 2630. British Literature I

3 Credits (3)

This course offers a study of British literature from its origins in Old English to the 18th century. This survey covers specific literary works--essays, short stories, novels, poems, and plays--as well as the social, cultural, and intellectual currents that influenced the literature.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Read and discuss representative works of British writers from its origins in Old English to the 18th century to understand cultural and historical movements which influenced those writers and their works.
  2. Identify the characteristics of various British literary genres, such as the essay, novel, short story, poetry, and dramatic literature.
  3. Apply effective analytic and interpretive strategies to British literary works using academic conventions of citation and style.

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ENGL 2640. British Literature II

3 Credits (3)

This course offers a study of British literature from the 18th century to the present. This survey covers specific literary works--essays, short stories, novels, poems, and plays--as well as the social, cultural, and intellectual currents that influenced the literature.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Read and discuss representative works of British writers from the 18th century to the present to understand cultural and historical movements, which influenced those writers,and their works.
  2. Identify the characteristics of various British literary genres, such as the essay, novel, short story, poetry, and dramatic literature.
  3. Apply effective analytic and interpretive strategies to British literary works using academic conventions of citation and style.

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ENGL 2650G. World Literature I

3 Credits (3)

In this course, students will read representative world masterpieces from ancient, medieval and Renaissance literature. Students will broaden their understanding of literature and their knowledge of other cultures through exploration of how literature represents individuals, ideas and customs of the world cultures. The course focuses strongly on examining the ways literature and culture intersect and define each other.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify and comprehend key authors and literary works from ancient periods to the Enlightenment.
  2. Understand each text's historical and cultural context.
  3. Identify and analyze a variety of literary forms, including poetry, plays, and philosophical and religious texts.
  4. Compare works from different cultures and historical periods examining genre, style, and content or theme.
  5. Analyze how literary works reflect historical, national, cultural, and ethnic differences.

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ENGL 2996. Special Topics

1-3 Credits

Emphasis on a literary and/or writing subject chosen for the semester. Repeatable for a unlimited credit under different subtitles.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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ENGL 301. Theory and Criticism: Rhetoric and Culture

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to rhetorical criticism with an emphasis on understanding the theoretical and cultural underpinnings for the rhetorical analyses of texts.

ENGL 302. Theory and Criticism: Literature and Culture

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to literary criticism, from its classical beginnings through contemporary critical approaches.

ENGL 303. Theory and Criticism: Film, Media and Culture

3 Credits (3)

Surveys classical and contemporary film theory. Explores the relationship of theory to textual analysis and filmmaking practices. Includes auteurism semiotics, psychoanalysis, and other theories, as well as theories of other media.

ENGL 304. Creative Writing: Prose

3 Credits (3)

Imaginative writing, chiefly prose narrative. Repeatable for a maximum of 9 credits.

ENGL 306. Creative Writing: Poetry

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to the writing of poetry. Repeatable for a total of 9 credits.

ENGL 307. Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to creative nonfiction. Skills emphasized will include the personal voice, powers of observation and reflection, advocacy, argument, and a creative, powerful use of language. Repeatable for a maximum of 9 credits.

ENGL 308. Creative Writing: Playwriting

3 Credits (3)

Technique of one-act playwriting, and analysis of dramatic structure. Crosslisted with: THEA 308

ENGL 309. Screenwriting I

3 Credits (3)

Writing intensive. Students learn the craft of screenwriting, honing skills in writing dialogue and visual narrative, crafting dynamic characters and dramatic action. Original student scripts will be performed and discussed in class. Consent of instructor required. Crosslisted with: CMI 309 and THTR 306

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 235 or CMI 235.

ENGL 310. Critical Writing

3 Credits (3)

A course in critical reading, writing, and research designed to prepare English majors for upper-division courses.

ENGL 315. Writing for the Web

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to writing for the World Wide Web through practical application and analysis on both theory and research. Allows hands-on learning in a computer classroom.

ENGL 321V. Modern European Drama

3 Credits (3)

Masterworks of European drama from the late 18th century to present. Crosslisted with: THEA 321V

ENGL 322. Dramatic Character

3 Credits (3)

How characters have been created for the stage from the beginning of theatrical performances in ancient Greece to the present day. Exploring characterization related to dramatic structure, style, and genre, and how dramatic characters differ from those in literary fiction. Crosslisted with: THEA 322.

ENGL 323. American Drama

3 Credits (3)

Masterworks of American drama by noted American playwrights. Crosslisted with: THEA 323

ENGL 326. Cultural Identity and Representation Across the Media

3 Credits (3)

Considers complex relationships between representation and culture including how images and language shape racial, ethnic, gender, sexual, and class identities. Examines theories from several disciplines. Includes lecture, discussion and production exercises.

ENGL 327V. Shakespeare around the Globe

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to multicultural issues in Shakespeare's plays and to adaptations of Shakespeare's plays in other cultures.

ENGL 328V. Literature of Science Fiction and Fantasy

3 Credits (3)

Survey and critical examination of the development of science fiction and fantasy as literature genres through selected authors and texts.

ENGL 329. Studies in Drama

3 Credits (3)

Emphasis on a group of related works of European or American drama; topics will vary. Crosslisted with: THEA 329 and FDMA 329

ENGL 339V. Chicana/o Literature

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to Chicano novels, short stories and selected creative nonfiction.

ENGL 354. Form and Technique in Fiction

3 Credits (3)

Literature course designed for fiction writers, especially those English majors in the Creative Writing emphasis. The course combines the study of published fiction with the study of craft. Some of the assignments will require the student to write original fiction based on exercises provided by the instructor. Repeatable for up to 9 credits.

ENGL 356. Form and Technique in Poetry

3 Credits (3)

Literature course designed for poets, especially those English majors in the Creative Writing emphasis. The course combines the study of published poetry with the study of craft. Some of the assignments will require the student to write original poems based on exercises provided by the instructor. Repeatable for up to 9 credits.

ENGL 358. Form and Technique in Playwriting

3 Credits (3)

Literature course designed for playwrights, especially those English majors in the Creative Writing emphasis. The course combines the study of published plays and performances with the study of craft. Some of the assignments will require the student to write original plays based on exercises provided by the instructor. Repeatable up to 9 credits.

ENGL 363. Literature for Children and Young Adults

3 Credits (3)

A comparative, historical survey of literature for young (K to 12th grade) readers. Emphasis on critical evaluation.

Prerequisite: junior or above standing.

ENGL 380V. Women Writers

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to multicultural women's traditions through intensive study of works by women writers. Crosslisted with: GNDR 380V.

ENGL 392V. Mythology

3 Credits (3)

Greek and Roman mythology and its impact on European and English literature. Readings in myths, classical plays, and other literature with mythological interest, including nonclassical myths.

ENGL 394V. Southwestern Literature

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to multicultural literature of the Southwest: oral folk literature, literary fiction (classic and contemporary), nonfiction and poetry.

ENGL 399. Special Topics

3 Credits (3)

Emphasis on a theme, genre, figure, or technique chosen for study during the semester. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 400. Independent Study: Upper Division

1-3 Credits

For students with demonstrated aptitude for independent work. Approval of instructor required before registration. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 403. Web Design and Development

3 Credits (3)

Combines study and practice of web design and development as rhetoric, technical, processual, and collaborative.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Read and write HTML without the use of an editor Design and format web pages via CSS Understand what JavaScript is and how it's used Understand the methods for accessibility Create usable, aesthetically pleasing, and functional websites

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ENGL 404. User Experience and Assistance

3 Credits (3)

Includes theories and discussions of users, usability, accessibility, disability, design, embodiment, and ethics to prepare students to understand, write for, and collaborate with users and audiences in technical and professional communication contexts.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand histories and politics that inform contemporary best practices and ethics conversations associated with the development of user-oriented documentation Develop a robust vocabulary that permits engagement in both academic and industry-based conversations about users, access, and documentation Discuss pros, cons, and nuances of multiple user-centered research methods Produce professional user-assistance documents and discuss the ethics of design decisions.

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ENGL 405. Chaucer

3 Credits (3)

Principal works, with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales.

ENGL 407. Milton

3 Credits (3)

Studies in Milton's works, including Paradise Lost.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Milton’s poetry using the methods of close reading; Demonstrate ability to read and develop persuasive literary-critical interpretations of Milton’s poetry and prose; Demonstrate ability to locate Milton’s writings in historical and cultural context; Demonstrate skill in working with relevant secondary resources and research tools including the MLA bibliography to write a Working Bibliography and Research Paper on a topic related to our course material.

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ENGL 408. Shakespeare I

3 Credits (3)

Study in Shakespeare’s early poems and plays. Repeatable for up to six credits under different subtitles.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Shakespeare’s poetry using the methods of close reading Demonstrate ability to read and develop persuasive literary-critical interpretations of Shakespeare’s poems and plays; Demonstrate skill in working with relevant secondary resources and research tools including the MLA bibliography to write a research paper on a topic related to our course material; Work effectively in small groups to interpret a scene through performance

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ENGL 409. Shakespeare II

3 Credits (3)

Study in Shakespeare's later plays. ENGL 408 is not a prerequisite. Repeatable for up to six credits under different subtitles. Crosslisted with THEA 409.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Shakespeare’s poetry using the methods of close reading; Demonstrate ability to read and develop persuasive literary-critical interpretations of Shakespeare’s poems and plays; Demonstrate skill in working with relevant secondary resources and research tools including the MLA bibliography to write a research paper on a topic related to our course material; Work effectively in small groups to interpret a scene through performance.

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ENGL 412. Writing in the Workplace

3 Credits (3)

Study of workplace writing practices, including a focus on research-based, theoretical, and pedagogical approaches to professional communication.

ENGL 413. Advanced Creative Writing: Prose Workshop

3 Credits (3)

Imaginative writing, chiefly the narrative. May be repeated up to 12 credits.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 304 or consent of instructor.

ENGL 414. Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry Workshop

3 Credits (3)

For advanced writers of poetry. Repeatable for a total of 12 credits.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 306 or consent of instructor.

ENGL 416. Approaches to Literature

3 Credits (3)

Understanding, appreciation, techniques of instruction in the high school.

Prerequisite: at least 6 credits in upper-division English courses.

ENGL 417. Advanced Study in Critical Theory

3 Credits (3)

Advanced study of one or more major trends in theoretical inquiry within English studies. Some prior study of theory, such as English 301-303, strongly recommended. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 418. History of Rhetoric

3 Credits (3)

Investigation of crucial writings that have shaped Western attitudes towards and practice of rhetoric. Will examine key concepts from the Greeks through the Enlightenment, especially as they have influenced contemporary rhetorical theory.

ENGL 419. Modern Rhetorical Theory

3 Credits (3)

Major figures in rhetorical theory, with particular emphasis on developments in rhetorical theory in the twentieth century.

ENGL 422. Advanced Study in a Literary Form or Genre

3 Credits (3)

Close study of a topic in a particular literary form or genre. May be repeated under different subtitles.

ENGL 423. Advanced Study in a Major Author

3 Credits (3)

Close study of selected works by a major author. May be repeated under different subtitles.

ENGL 424. Advanced Study in a Major Text

3 Credits (3)

Close study of a major text. Course subtitled in the Schedule of Classes. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 430. Online Publishing

3 Credits (3)

This three-credit course provides a theoretical background for online publishing and design as well as hands on experience publishing an online arts magazine.

ENGL 431. Technical Editing

3 Credits (3)

Uses workshops, readings, hands-on projects, and discussion to improve skills in gathering, writing, designing, and editing technical information. For students interested in technical communication as well as students interested in developing strengths in communicating in scientific and technical fields.

ENGL 433. Victorian Literature

3 Credits (3)

Intensive study of major writers and critical topics from the Victorian period. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 442. Modern and Contemporary American Poetry

3 Credits (3)

Studies the development of American poetry from World War I to the present. Repeatable under a different subtitle. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

ENGL 445. Postmodern Fiction

3 Credits (3)

Study of the various forms of formally innovative experimental fiction produced since 1945, with a focus on the relationship between literary history and its sociohistorical contexts. Some texts will be read in translation. Repeatable under different subtitles. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

ENGL 446. Advanced Creative Writing: Nonfiction Prose

3 Credits (3)

This workshop-format class for advanced writers will examine the many varieties of Creative Nonfiction. Students should be prepared for a rigorous reading load of published nonfiction and student submissions. Because of the workshop format, every student is expected to contribute extensively to every class, both in printed form and oral comments. Taught with ENGL 546. May be repeated up to 12 credits.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 307 or consent of instructor.

ENGL 449. Advanced Study in Writing

3 Credits (3)

Close study of a topic in composition, rhetoric and/or technical and professional communication. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits with permission of department.

ENGL 453. World Literatures

3 Credits (3)

Study of one or more literary traditions exclusive of those originating in Europe and the United States. Readings will include texts in translation. Repeatable under different subtitles. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

ENGL 458. Latino/a Literature and Culture

3 Credits (3)

Focuses on established and emergent Latino/a literary and cultural production. Incorporates both literary and sociocultural readings of texts. Repeatable under different subtitles. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

ENGL 460. Proposal Writing

3 Credits (3)

Developing proposals and grants in a workshop setting.

ENGL 469. Advanced Study in American Literature

3 Credits (3)

Covers selected works for a particular period of American literary history. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 470. Approaches to Composition

3 Credits (3)

Theory and practice of teaching writing. Discussion and application of classroom practices, definition of standards, and evaluation of student writing.

ENGL 471 M. Scholarly Writing for International Graduate Students

3 Credits (3)

Instruction and practice in writing major academic genres, including experimental, descriptive, and problem-solution research reports, proposals, and library referenced papers. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Graded: S/U Grading (S/U, Audit).

Prerequisite(s): Placement based on English language screening test or successful completion of ENGL 1105M; a minimum TOEFL score of 500 or consent of instructor; and successful completion of SPCD 108/490 where indicated by placement.

ENGL 478. Document Design

3 Credits (3)

Advanced study in writing, with an emphasis on the computer as a tool for designing visually informative text. Includes theory and research in document design and the use of page composition and graphics software.

ENGL 479. Computers and Writing

3 Credits (3)

This course will trace the history of computers and composition as a field by looking at the work of important scholars including Selfe, Hawisher, Johnson-Eilola, and Wysocki. We will then focus on specific ways new media might be integrated into composition classrooms. The course will include discussions, student facilitations, and experimentation with technologies.

ENGL 481. Women's Literature

3 Credits (3)

Intensive study of literature by women, in particular historical, aesthetic, cultural, or intellectual contexts. Repeatable under different subtitles. Crosslisted with: GNDR 484

ENGL 489. Cultural Studies: Literature and Theory

3 Credits (3)

Examines the theory and practice of cultural studies in relation to the variety of discourse describable as literary, including autobiography, avant-garde writing, nonfiction prose, the essay, online writing, folklore, and popular genre fiction (such as mystery, romance, thriller, or horror). Repeatable under different subtitles. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

ENGL 497. Internship

3-6 Credits (3-6)

Supervised technical and professional communication internship in business, industry, government, or the university. Repeatable for a total of 6 credits. Consent of instructor required.

ENGL 500. Supervised Study

1-3 Credits

To prepare the student for the master s degree examinations by special studies in fields not covered in routine course work.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENGL 501. Online Publishing

3 Credits (3)

This three-credit course provides a theoretical background for online publishing and design as well as hands-on experience publishing an online arts magazine. Taught with ENGL 430.

ENGL 502. Critical Conversations in Technical and Professional Communication

3 Credits (3)

Introduces students to critical histories, theories, and key concepts in technical and professional communication across academic and industry boundaries.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the histories and politics of emergence of technical and professional communication as a field of study and expertise; Identify and track key concepts, terms, and conversations that give shape to technical and professional communication; Draw on a range of theories and methodologies to articulate and critique the function and effects of technical and professional communication; Participate in disciplinary conversations through research and writing.

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ENGL 503. Web Design and Development

3 Credits (3)

Combines study and practice of web design and development as rhetorical, technical, processual, and collaborative.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Read and write HTML without the use of an editor Design and format web pages via CSS Understand what JavaScript is and how it's used Understand the methods for accessibility

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ENGL 504. User Experience and Assistance

3 Credits (3)

Includes theories and discussions of users, usability, accessibility, disability, design, embodiment, and ethics to prepare students to understand, write for, and collaborate with users and audiences in technical and professional communication contexts.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand histories and politics that inform contemporary best practices and ethics conversations associated with the development of user-oriented documentation Develop a robust vocabulary that permits engagement in both academic and industry-based conversations about users, access, and documentation Discuss pros, cons, and nuances of multiple user-centered research methods Produce professional user-assistance documents and discuss the ethics of design decisions

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ENGL 505. Graduate Study in Chaucer

3 Credits (3)

Principal works, with emphasis on the Canterbury Tales. Requirements include independent directed research. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

ENGL 507. Special Topics in Rhetoric and Technical and Professional Communication

3 Credits (3)

Seminar course centered on contemporary issues in rhetoric and technical and professional communication. Repeatable under different subtitles, for up to 6 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Use rhetoric inquiry and theory to contextualize and study technical and professional communication. Understand the disciplinary overlaps, tensions, and possibilities among rhetoric and technical and professional communication. Track a contemporary thematic trend, issue, or question through rhetoric and technical and professional communication.

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ENGL 508. Graduate Study in Shakespeare I

3 Credits (3)

Graduate study in Shakespeare's early poems and plays. Requirements include independent directed research. Repeatable for up to six credits under different subtitles.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Shakespeare’s poetry using the methods of close reading Demonstrate graduate-level ability to read and develop persuasive literary-critical interpretations of Shakespeare’s poems and plays Demonstrate graduate-level skill in working with relevant secondary resources and research tools including the MLA bibliography to write a research paper on a topic related to our course material; Work effectively in small groups to interpret a scene through performance

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ENGL 509. Graduate Study in Shakespeare II

3 Credits (3)

Study in Shakespeare’s late poems and plays. Requirements include independent directed research. Repeatable for up to six credits under different subtitles.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyze Shakespeare’s poetry using the methods of close reading Demonstrate graduate-level ability to read and develop persuasive literary-critical interpretations of Shakespeare’s poems and plays; Demonstrate graduate-level skill in working with relevant secondary resources and research tools including the MLA bibliography to write a research paper on a topic related to our course material; Work effectively in small groups to interpret a scene through performance

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ENGL 510. Proseminar in Rhetoric and Professional Communication

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to research in rhetoric and professional communication. Taught with ENGL 610.

ENGL 512. Graduate Study in Writing in the Workplace

3 Credits (3)

Study of workplace writing practices, including a focus on research-based, theoretical, and pedagogical approaches to professional communication.

ENGL 513. Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction

3 Credits (3)

Advanced creative writing prose workshop. Imaginative writing, chiefly the narrative. Graduate level workshop for students who are not in the English Department MFA program. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Taught with ENGL 413 with additional work required at the graduate level.

ENGL 514. Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry

3 Credits (3)

Creative writing poetry workshop for advanced writers of poetry. Graduate level works for students who are not in the English Department MFA program. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits. Taught with ENGL 414 with additional work required at the graduate level.

ENGL 516. Graduate Study in Approaches to Literature

3 Credits (3)

Understanding, appreciation, techniques of instruction in the high school. Requirements include independent directed research.

Prerequisite: at least 6 credits in upper-division English courses.

ENGL 517. Graduate Study in Critical Theory

3 Credits (3)

Advanced study of one or more major trends in theoretical inquiry within English studies. Some prior study of theory, such as English 301, 302, or 303, strongly recommended. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 518. History of Rhetoric

3 Credits (3)

An investigation of the crucial writings that have shaped Western attitudes towards and practice of rhetoric. Course will examine key texts from the Greeks through the Enlightenment, especially as they have influenced contemporary rhetorical theory.

ENGL 519. Graduate Study in Modern Rhetorical Theory

3 Credits (3)

Major figures in rhetorical theory, with particular emphasis on developments in rhetorical theory in the 20th century. Students will be responsible for all requirements of ENGL 419 and will in addition undertake independent directed research.

ENGL 521. Graduate Study in a Literary Period or Movement

3 Credits (3)

Close study of a topic in a particular literary period or movement. Requirements include independent directed research. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 522. Graduate Study in a Literary Form or Genre

3 Credits (3)

Close study of a topic in a particular literary form or genre. Requirements include independent directed research. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 523. Graduate Study of a Major Author

3 Credits (3)

Close study of selected works of a major author. Requirements include independent directed research. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 524. Graduate Study in a Major Text

3 Credits (3)

Close study of a major text. Requirements include independent directed research. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 525. Graduate Study in Comparative Literature

3 Credits (3)

Close study of a selection on non-English literary works read in translation. English-language works from a similar literary period or genre may also be read. Requirements include independent directed research. Repeatable under different subtitles.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

ENGL 526. Special Topics in Critical Theory

3 Credits (3)

Study of a specific historical or theoretical topic, trend, or movement in Critical Theory. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 527. Graduate Study in Film and Digital Media

3 Credits (3)

Offers close graduate study of a form or genre, a major figure or style, a historical period or movement, or a major theme or text. Topics vary from semester to semester.

ENGL 529. British Romanticism

3 Credits (3)

Intensive study of major writers and critical topics from the Romantic period. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 531. Technical Editing

3 Credits (3)

Uses workshops, readings, hands-on projects, and discussion to improve skills in gathering, writing, designing, and editing technical information. For students interested in technical communication as well as students interested in developing strengths in communicating in scientific and technical fields.

ENGL 533. Victorian Literature

3 Credits (3)

Intensive study of major writers and critical topics from the Victorian period. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 534. Graduate Study: Form and Technique in Fiction

3 Credits (3)

Advanced study of issues in form and technique in fiction, including point of view, scene and dialogue, and story structure. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits.

ENGL 535. Graduate Study: Form and Technique in Poetry

3 Credits (3)

Advanced study of issues in form and technique in poetry, including voice, tone, syntax, and structure. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits.

ENGL 536. The Borderlands Writing Project

3-6 Credits (3-6)

Intensive month-long seminar for practicing teachers and educators designed to improve the teaching of writing and the writing process and literacy and reading in schools and other educational contexts. Reading, discussing, and writing about current professional literature; completing teacher inquiry; and planning action research. Participants complete personal and professional writing, as well as additional professional development activities. By invitation only. Affiliated with the National Writing Project. Consent of instructor required. Crosslisted with: RDG 536

ENGL 542. Modern and Contemporary American Poetry

3 Credits (3)

Studies the development of American poetry from World War I to the present. Repeatable under different subtitles. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

ENGL 543. Multimedia Theory and Production

3 Credits (3)

Issues, theories, and production practices underlying design of multimedia, including rhetorical choices, aesthetic approaches, usability concerns, and diverse academic and popular discourses contributing to continued development of digital texts. Taught with ENGL 643.

ENGL 544. Modern British Fiction

3 Credits (3)

Study of the fiction produced in the British Isles in the 20th and 21st centuries. Repeatable under different subtitles. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

ENGL 545. Postmodern Fiction

3 Credits (3)

Study of the various forms of formally innovative experimental fiction produced since 1945, with a focus on the relationship between literary history and its sociohistorical contexts. Some texts will be read in translation. Repeatable under different subtitles. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

ENGL 546. Advanced Creative Writing: Nonfiction Prose

3 Credits (3)

This graduate-level workshop will examine the many varieties of Creative Nonfiction. Students should be prepared for a rigorous reading load of published nonfiction and student submissions. Because of the workshop format, every student is expected to contribute extensively to every class, both in printed form and oral comments. Taught with ENGL 446 with additional work required at the graduate level. Consent of Instructor required. Crosslisted with: ENGL 446.

ENGL 548. Graduate Study in Empirical Research

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to empirical research methods in composition, professional communication, and rhetoric.

ENGL 549. Graduate Study in Writing

3 Credits (3)

Close study of a topic in composition, rhetoric, and/or technical and professional communication. Topics vary. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits.

ENGL 550. Graduate Study in Literacy

3 Credits (3)

Studies in literacy theory and literacy research. Topics may vary. Taught with ENGL 650.

ENGL 552. Graduate Study in History of the English Language

3 Credits (3)

This course examines the history of the English language from its Indo-European origins through its development into an international language. The aim is to describe the English language formally and to trace linguistic change over time. Samples of written English will illustrate various stages in the development of English. Also considered are contemporary social and political issues related to language, including the problem of 'standard English' and the uses of language in advertising, the media, and politics.

ENGL 553. World Literatures

3 Credits (3)

Study of one or more literary traditions exclusive of those originating in Europe and the United States. Readings will include texts in translation. Repeatable under different subtitles. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

ENGL 555. Graduate Study in Rhetoric of Scientific Literature

3 Credits (3)

Intensive study of the rhetoric of selected works of scientific literature.

ENGL 558. Latino/a Literature and Culture

3 Credits (3)

Focuses on established and emergent Latino/a literary and cultural production. Incorporates both literary and sociocultural readings of texts. Repeatable under different subtitles. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

ENGL 559. Black Literature and Culture in the United States

3 Credits (3)

Focuses on established and emergent Black U.S. literary and cultural production. Incorporates both literary and sociocultural readings of texts. Repeatable under different subtitles. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

ENGL 560. Proposal and Grant Writing

3 Credits (3)

Developing proposals and grants in a workshop setting.

ENGL 561. Topics in Writing Program Administration

3 Credits (3)

Explores issues, theories, and research underlying the design of writing programs and the administration of writing centers. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. Taught with ENGL 661.

ENGL 562. Interdisciplinary, Client-Based Project Practicum

3 Credits (3)

Hands-on experience in collaborating within interdisciplinary teams designing projects for organizational clients. Taught with ENGL 462.

ENGL 563. Graduate Study in English Literature

3 Credits (3)

Covers selected works for a particular period of English literary history. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 564. History and Theory of Composition Studies

3 Credits (3)

Studies in the history and theory of composition as a discipline. Taught with ENGL 664.

ENGL 565. Intercultural Rhetoric and Professional Communication

3 Credits (3)

Examines rhetorical traditions in intercultural professional, technical, academic, and governmental contexts. Taught with ENGL 665.

ENGL 567. Documentary Film Theory and Criticism

3 Credits (3+3P)

Course offers critical survey of documentary film theory and criticism including considerations of the epistemological assumptions, rhetorical choices, aesthetic approaches, political circumstances of historical and contemporary documentary film.

ENGL 568. Rhetoric and Cultural Studies

3 Credits (3)

Explores intersections between rhetoric and cultural studies. Examines theories and practices of texts and discourses in political and cultural contexts. Taught with ENGL 668.

ENGL 569. Graduate in American Literature

3 Credits (3)

A group of works from a particular period of American literary history. Repeatable under different subtitles.

ENGL 570. Graduate Study in Approaches to Composition

3 Credits (3)

Theory and practice of teaching writing, including classroom practices, definition of standards, and evaluation of student writing. Requirements include independent directed research.

ENGL 571. Composition Pedagogy and Practicum

3 Credits (3)

Examines the pedagogical implications of contemporary composition theory and research. Focuses on teaching composition at the college level. Consent of instructor required.

ENGL 572. Technical-Professional Communication Pedagogies

3 Credits (3)

Combines theoretical and practical attention to the pedagogies that underwrite the teaching of technical and professional communication; culminates in the development of a TPC course proposal, syllabus, and rationale. For Graduate students only.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage with research and scholarship that reflects a range of approaches to conceptualize the purposes and goals of technical and professional communication courses; Articulate a range of possibilities for and responsibilities of technical and professional communication pedagogy; Compose and substantiate a teaching philosophy and course plan for teaching technical and professional communication.

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ENGL 574. Workshop: Advanced Writing Prose

3 Credits (3)

Intensive practice in prose writing, primarily fiction, in a workshop environment with peer criticism. Repeatable for a total of 15 credits. Consent of instructor required.

ENGL 575. Workshop: Advanced Writing Poetry

3 Credits (3)

Intensive practice in poetry writing in a workshop environment with peer criticism. Repeatable for a total of 15 credits. Consent of instructor required.

ENGL 576. Workshop: Advanced Writing Playwriting

3 Credits (3)

Intensive practice in dramatic writing in a workshop environment with peer criticism. Repeatable for a total of 9 credits. Consent of instructor required.

ENGL 577. Workshop: Advanced Technical and Professional Writing

3 Credits (3)

Intensive practice in technical and professional writing and editing in a workshop environment. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits. Consent of instructor required.

ENGL 578. Topics in Rhetoric and Technology

3 Credits (3)

Explores intersections between rhetoric and technology, approaches may highlight theory, media production, and/or research. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. Taught with ENGL 678.

ENGL 579. Computers and Writing

3 Credits (3)

This course will trace the history of computers and composition as a field by looking at the work of important scholars including Selfe, Hawisher, Johnson-Eilola, and Wysocki. We will then focus on specific ways new media might be integrated into composition classrooms. The course will include discussions, student facilitations, and experimentation with technologies.

ENGL 580. Graduate Problems in Creative Writing

3 Credits (3)

Independent study in creative writing. Consent of instructor required. Repeatable for a total of 9 credits.

ENGL 581. Women's Literature

3 Credits (3)

Intensive study of literature by women, in particular historical, aesthetic, cultural, or intellectual contexts. Repeatable under different subtitles. Crosslisted with: GNDR 584

ENGL 582. Gender and Popular Culture

3 Credits (3)

Intensive study of the representations of gender in popular culture. Examines the historical, aesthetic, and cultural contexts of these representation and the various critical and theoretical lenses we use to understand them. Repeatable under different subtitles. Crosslisted with: GNDR 582

ENGL 583. Critical Writing Studies

3 Credits (3)

Overview of current and historical approaches to the critical study of gender and language: how gender theoretically manifests in linguistic, social, cultural, academic, and professional contexts.

ENGL 584. Workshop: Advanced Academic Writing for International Students

3 Credits (3)

This workshop-based course is for graduate-level multilingual writers from all disciplines who want to improve their English academic writing in an intensive and collaborative environment. Students will propose a major writing project to workshop throughout the semester, such as dissertation, thesis, comprehensive exams, etc. Some of the topics covered will be academic language, cohesion/coherence, organization, and supporting academic arguments. Other topics to be determined by needs of the class. ) 4.Consent of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): 1.Be classified as a graduate student by the Graduate School 2.Be classified as an international student whose first language is not English 3.Have a major writing project in progress (comprehensive exams, thesis, dissertation, conference paper, etc.

ENGL 585. Advanced Writing Workshop: RPC Capstone

3 Credits (3)

Students work to develop and revise their chosen Master's program Capstone Project (a portfolio, thesis or master essay) in consultation with instructor and classmates. Students provide and receive feedback on their work-in-progress. Consent of Instructor required.

ENGL 589. Cultural Studies: Literature and Theory

3 Credits (3)

Examines the theory and practice of cultural studies in relation to the variety of discourse describable as literary, including autobiography, avant-garde writing, nonfiction prose, the essay, online writing, folklore, and popular genre fiction (such as mystery, romance, thriller, or horror). Repeatable under different subtitles. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

ENGL 590. Master's Seminar in Rhetoric

3 Credits (3)

Studies in theories of and issues in rhetoric. Topics may vary from year to year. Repeatable for a total of 9 credits.

ENGL 591. Graduate Screenwriting

3 Credits (3)

Students will prepare a feature-length screenplay. Script analysis will be in an advanced workshop format. Scripts will be read and discussed, scenes performed and reactions analyzed to consider effect of dialogue, character development, etc. Aimed at preparing writers for the professional market. Consent of instructor required.

ENGL 592. Master's Theory, Practice, and Profession

3 Credits (3)

Students will study major poetics/narratology pieces in the field and other related professional topics such as literary citizenship, publishing, and job seeking skills. Students will also propose and develop a year-long project in one of the above categories, such as a community reading or workshop, a conference panel proposal, a paper presentation, a chapbook press launch, writing/placing literary book reviews, or work on an outreach project. Must be taken in each of the last two semesters of the MFA and currently with ENGL 594 (Master's Workshop). Restricted to MFA-Creative Writing students, or by consent of instructor.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand, analyze, and effectively use the critical discourse of poetics/narratology/craft in the field of creative writing Design and execute an outreach or professional project that contributes to a creative writing community Explore applications of their training in professional contexts. Analyze how students' own reading, writing, and research respond to existing leadership in professional creative writing communities, help provide new leadership, and answer community needs.

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ENGL 594. Master's Workshop

3 Credits (3)

Students will submit a draft of their thesis project, in their major genre, for workshop critique. Revision of the thesis draft will be submitted to the instructor. Restricted to MFA Creative Writing students, or by consent of instructor. Must be taken in each of the last two semesters of the MFA, and concurrently with ENGL 592 (Master's Theory, Practice, and Profession).

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand, analyze, and effectively use the critical discourse of the field of creative writing to discuss a thesis. Examine how their thesis operates with the genre and within the context of contemporary literature. Critically contextualize their thesis and those of their peers Apply various revision strategies across a thesis-length manuscript, responding to the critiques of the instructor and their peers Achieve the standards of publication of the University's thesis editor and learn those of the publishing environment in their genre.

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ENGL 595. Master's Workshop: Poetry

3-6 Credits (3-6)

Students will submit a draft of thesis project for workshop critique. Revision of the thesis draft submitted to the instructor. Restricted to MFA CW majors.

Prerequisite(s): Enrolled in MFA penultimate semester.

ENGL 596. Master's Workshop: Fiction

3-6 Credits (3)

Students will submit a draft of thesis project for workshop critique. Revision of the thesis draft submitted to the instructor. Restricted to MFA CW majors.

Prerequisite(s): Enrolled in MFA penultimate semester.

ENGL 597. Internship in Technical and Professional Communication

3-6 Credits (3-6)

Supervised technical and professional communication in business, industry, government, or the university. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits. Consent of instructor required.

ENGL 598. Master's Essay

3 Credits (3)

Students electing the master essay option complete revision of a scholarly essay of 25-30 pages, the approximate length of a journal article, and reformulation of this essay to the 7-8 pages appropriate for presentation at a conference. This option also requires research of appropriate publication venues and a final oral defense of the project. A supervising faculty member will approve the selected essay, guide revision, and help students form an examining committee, which consists of at least two members of the graduate English faculty and one member of the graduate faculty from outside the department. Students are encouraged to undertake the Master Essay process in the first half of their third semester of full time graduate work, or soon after completing 18 hours of course work. This option is the preferred exam option, particularly for those students who intend to pursue Ph.D. study. Consent of instructor required.

ENGL 599. Master's Thesis

1-15 Credits

Thesis.

ENGL 600. Doctoral Research

1-15 Credits

Assigns credit for research performed prior to the doctoral comprehensive examination.

ENGL 601. Qualitative Research

3 Credits (3)

Theory and practice of designing research studies and of collecting and analyzing data. Emphasis on qualitative methods of research in composition, professional communication, and rhetoric.

ENGL 602. Quantitative Research

3 Credits (3)

Theory and practice of designing quantitative research studies and of collecting and analyzing data. Emphasis on quantitative methods of research in composition, professional communication, and rhetoric.

ENGL 603. Rhetorical Criticism and Methodology

3 Credits (3)

Theory and practice of designing research studies and of collecting and analyzing data. Emphasis on methods of rhetorical criticism.

ENGL 604. Digital Research Methods

3 Credits (3)

This course will serve as one of the core methods courses in the RPC PhD program, focusing on “digital” methods in rhetorical studies. As such, the aim of this class is to help you begin to gain confidence in conducting research in rhetoric, professional communication, and composition using digital methods. In this course we will assume that digital methods in rhetoric take broadly two forms: first, digital methods of acquisition, processing, and presentation of research data. And second, digital methods of production and circulation of rhetorical objects. The former closely resembles the methods of “digital humanities” while the latter will be closer to media archaeology and “critical making” practices. In all cases, we will relate these tools and methods to key questions and theories in our field, asking how and why we might apply digital methods in rhetorical scholarship.

Prerequisite(s): graduate standing.

ENGL 610. Proseminar in Rhetoric and Professional Communication

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to research in rhetoric and professional communication. Required of and limited to students enrolled in the Ph.D. program in Rhetoric and Professional Communication.

ENGL 643. Multimedia Theory and Production

3 Credits (3)

Issues, theories, and production practices underlying design of multimedia, including rhetorical choices, aesthetic approaches, usability concerns, and diverse academic and popular discourses contributing to continued development of digital texts. Taught with ENGL 543.

ENGL 646. Teaching Rhetoric and Writing with English Language Learners

3 Credits (3)

This course introduces students to the rich interdisciplinary world of writing for English language learners with the goal of helping researchers and instructors understand the unique characteristics and needs of ELL writers. It also examines Generation 1.5, bilingualism, and Spanish-dominant writers along the U.S.-Mexico Border. The course prepares students to work with ELL writing in curriculum design, needs analysis, classroom implementation, assessment, writing program administration, and institutional policies. The course will be a requirement for those GAs seeking to teach experimental sections of first-year multilingual composition at NMSU.

Prerequisite(s): graduate standing.

ENGL 649. Graduate Study in Writing

3 Credits (3)

Close study of a topic in composition, rhetoric, and/or technical and profession communication. Repeatable for a total of 6 credits.

ENGL 650. Graduate Study in Literacy

3 Credits (3)

Studies in literacy theory and literacy research. Topics may vary. Taught with ENGL 550.

ENGL 661. Topics in Writing Program Administration

3 Credits (3)

Explores issues, theories, and research underlying writing programs and the administration of writing centers. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. Taught with ENGL 561.

ENGL 664. History and Theory of Composition Studies

3 Credits (3)

Studies in the history and theory of composition as a discipline. Taught with ENGL 564.

ENGL 665. Intercultural Rhetoric and Professional Communication

3 Credits (3)

Examines rhetorical traditions in intercultural professional, technical, academic, and governmental contexts. Taught with ENGL 565.

ENGL 668. Rhetoric and Cultural Studies

3 Credits (3)

Explores intersections between rhetoric and cultural studies. Examines theories and practices of texts and discourses in political and cultural contexts. Taught with ENGL 568.

ENGL 678. Topics in Rhetoric and Technology

3 Credits (3)

Explores intersections between rhetoric and technology, approaches may highlight theory, media production, and/or research. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. Taught with ENGL 578.

ENGL 683. Critical Writing Studies

3 Credits (3)

This course investigates the field of Writing Studies as a distinct field of study, related to but not synonymous with Composition Studies. While debates surrounding the relationships among Writing Studies and Composition Studies flourish, this course centers on the former—investigating writing as a practice, process, and object that merits attention in its own right. Such attention will be grounded in contemporary critical and cultural theory that contests writing as a positive or neutral sign (i.e. activity theory, posthumanism, ecocriticism, new materialism, new media studies; feminist, queer, critical race or decolonial theory). Crosslisted with: ENGL 583.

Prerequisite(s): graduate standing.

ENGL 690. Doctoral Seminar in Rhetoric

3 Credits (3)

Studies in theories of and issues in rhetoric. Topics may vary from year to year. Repeatable for a maximum of 9 credits.

ENGL 700. Doctoral Dissertation

1-15 Credits

Dissertation.