CHEM-CHEMISTRY

CHEM 1111. Basic Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

For students whose preparatory science or math training has been deficient. Does not meet the chemistry requirement in any curriculum.

Prerequisite: Enhanced ACT composite score of at least 18 or a grade of C- or better in CCDM 114 N.

Learning Outcomes
  1. The goals and objectives for CHEM 1111 are to equip students with the necessary problem solving skills to be successful in CHEM 1215G/1225G

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CHEM 1120G. Introduction to Chemistry Lecture and Laboratory (non majors)

4 Credits (3+3P)

This course covers qualitative and quantitative areas of non-organic general chemistry for non-science majors and some health professions. Students will learn and apply principles pertaining, but not limited to, atomic and molecular structure, the periodic table, acids and bases, mass relationships, and solutions. The laboratory component introduces students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment.

Prerequisite: CCDM 114N or A S 103 or MATH 1215 or higher.

Learning Outcomes
  1. (Lecture) Use the different systems of measurements and perform conversions within the same system of measurement and between different systems of measurements
  2. (Lecture) Identify elements from their name or symbol, use the periodic table to describe reactivity patterns of elements and to predict compound formation.
  3. (Lecture) Describe the basic structure of an atom using subatomic particles, and apply these concepts to nuclear reactions.
  4. (Lecture) Describe ion formation and the difference between covalent and ionic compounds. Name and write formulas for ionic and simple molecular compounds.
  5. (Lecture) Write and balance chemical reactions. Use balanced reactions in stoichiometric calculations.
  6. (Lecture) Describe the differences between the solid, liquid and gas phases. Use the gas laws in calculations, and apply these laws to everyday situations.
  7. (Lecture) Explain different types of energy, and how energy is released or absorbed in a reaction
  8. (Lecture) Describe acid and base behavior.
  9. (Lecture) Explain the intermolecular attractive forces that determine physical properties; apply this knowledge to qualitatively evaluate these forces and predict the physical properties that result.
  10. 1(Lecture) Explain the intermolecular attractive forces that determine physical properties; apply this knowledge to qualitatively evaluate these forces and predict the physical properties that result
  11. 1(Laboratory) Practice concepts associated with laboratory safety, including the possible consequences of not adhering to appropriate safety guidelines.
  12. 1(Laboratory) Demonstrate the computational skills needed to perform appropriate laboratory-
  13. related calculations to include, but not be limited to determining the number of significant figures in numerical value, solving problems using values represented in exponential notation, solving dimensional analysis problems, and manipulating mathematical formulas as needed to determine the value of a variable.
  14. 1(Laboratory) Perform laboratory observations (both qualitative and quantitative) using sensory experience and appropriate measurement instrumentation (both analog and digital).
  15. 1(Laboratory) Record quantitatively measured values to the correct number of significant figures and assign the correct units.
  16. 1(Laboratory) Master basic laboratory techniques including, but not limited to weighing samples (liquid and solid), determining sample volumes, measuring the temperature of samples, heating and cooling a sample or reaction mixture, decantation, filtration, and titration.
  17. 1(Laboratory) Draw appropriate conclusions based on data and analyses.
  18. 1Present experimental results in laboratory reports of appropriate length, style and depth, or through other modes as required.
  19. 1Determine chemical formulas and classify different types of reactions.
  20. 1Relate laboratory experimental observations, operations, calculations, and findings to theoretical concepts presented in the complementary lecture course.

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CHEM 1121. General Supplemental Instruction I

1 Credit (1)

Collaborative workshop for students in General Chemistry I. Course does not count toward departmental degree requirements. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits.

Corequisite(s): CHEM 1215G.

CHEM 1122. General Supplemental Instruction II

1 Credit (1)

Collaborative workshop for students in General Chemistry II. Course does not count toward departmental degree requirements. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits.

Corequisite(s): CHEM 1225G.

CHEM 1123. Principles of Supplemental Instruction III

1 Credit (1)

Collaborative workshop for students in CHEM 1120G, Principles and Applications of Chemistry. Course does not count toward departmental degree requirements. May be repeated for maximum of 2 credits.

Corequisite(s): CHEM 1120G.

CHEM 1215G. General Chemistry I Lecture and Laboratory for STEM Majors

4 Credits (3+3P)

This course covers descriptive and theoretical chemistry.

Prerequisite: (1) grade of C- or better in MATH 1215 or higher, or a Mathematics Placement Exam Score adequate to enroll in mathematics courses beyond MATH 1215.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Use dimensional analysis, the SI system of units and appropriate significant figures to solve quantitative calculations in science. Understand the differences between physical and chemical changes to matter. Classify types of matter. Understand the scientific method in the context of scientific discoveries. Explain the structure of atoms, isotopes and ions in terms of subatomic particles. Analyze how periodic properties (e.g. electronegativity, atomic and ionic radii, ionization energy, electron affinity, metallic character) and reactivity of elements results from electron configurations of atoms. Understand the creation of different types of compounds (ionic and molecular), comparing and contrasting their structures, naming schemes and formulas. Apply knowledge of electronic structure to determine molecular spatial arrangement and polarity. Understand bulk pure substances, their properties and their states of matter by understanding and identifying intermolecular forces. Apply kinetic molecular theory to relate atomic level behavior to macroscopic properties. Introduce the mole and apply the mole concept to amounts on a macroscopic and a microscopic level Understand mixtures, solubility by considering intermolecular forces and expressing concentration in molarity. Identify different reaction types. Apply the law of conservation of mass to reactions. Perform stoichiometry on balanced reactions. Laboratory Student Learning Outcomes Demonstrate and apply concepts associated with laboratory safety, including the possible consequences of not adhering to appropriate safety guidelines. Demonstrate the computational skills needed to perform appropriate laboratory related calculations to include, but not be limited to determining the number of significant figures in numerical value with the correct units, solving problems using values represented in exponential notation, solving dimensional analysis problems, and manipulating mathematical formulas as needed to determine the value of a variable. Perform laboratory observations (both qualitative and quantitative) using sensory experience and appropriate measurement instrumentation (both analog and digital). Prepare solutions with an acceptable accuracy to a known concentration using appropriate glassware. Master basic laboratory techniques including, but not limited to weighing samples (liquid and solid), determining sample volumes, measuring the temperature of samples, heating and cooling a sample or reaction mixture, decantation, filtration, and titration. Draw conclusions based on data and analyses from laboratory experiments. Relate laboratory experimental observations, operations, calculations, and findings to theoretical concepts presented in the complementary lecture course.

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CHEM 1216. General Chemistry I Lecture and Laboratory for CHEM Majors

4 Credits (3+3P)

As the first of a two-semester sequence, this course teaches fundamental concepts in chemistry, including the electronic structure of atoms, chemical periodicity, nature of chemical bonds, molecular structure, the three phases of matter, etc. Designed for majors in chemical and other physical sciences, including engineering. May be appropriate for the life science major. It is assumed that the students are familiar with college algebra, chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, and scientific measurements. The laboratory component is designed to complement the theory and concepts presented in lecture, and will introduce students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment.

Prerequisite(s): Eligible to take MATH 1250G and an ACT composite score of 22 or higher.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Apply the mole concept to amounts at a microscopic level and use this to perform stoichiometric calculations for reactions in solution, gases and thermochemistry. Calculate solution concentrations in various units. Apply the gas laws and kinetic molecular theory to relate atomic level behavior to macroscopic properties. Explain the electronic structure of atoms, isotopes and ions in terms of its subatomic particles. Analyze how periodic properties (e.g. electronegativity, atomic and ionic radii, ionization energy, electron affinity, metallic character) and reactivity of elements results from electronic configurations of atoms. Understand the nature of chemical bonds (ionic and covalent). Apply knowledge of electronic structure to determine molecular structure and polarity. Understand the formation of different phases of matter and the underlying fundamental intermolecular interactions. Describe physical states and changes, and distinguish these from chemical changes. Describe the energy conversions that occur in chemical reactions and state changes, relating heat of reaction to thermodynamic properties such as enthalpy and internal energy; apply these principles to measure and calculate energy changes in reaction. 1 Apply principles of general chemistry to specific real-world problems in environment, engineering and health-related fields.

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CHEM 1225G. General Chemistry II Lecture and Laboratory for STEM Majors

4 Credits (3+3P)

This course is intended to serve as a continuation of general chemistry principles for students enrolled in science, engineering, and certain preprofessional programs. The course includes, but is not limited to a theoretical and quantitative coverage of solutions and their properties, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, entropy and free energy, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Additional topics may include (as time permits) organic, polymer, atmospheric, and biochemistry. The laboratory component is designed to complement the theory and concepts presented in lecture, and will introduce students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in CHEM 1215G.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Explain the intermolecular attractive forces that determine physical properties and phase transitions, and apply this knowledge to qualitatively evaluate these forces from structure and to predict the physical properties that result. Calculate solution concentrations in various units, explain the effects of temperature, pressure and structure on solubility, and describe the colligative properties of solutions, and determine solution concentrations using colligative property values and vice versa. Describe the dynamic nature of chemical equilibrium, and apply LeChatelier’s Principle to predict the effect of concentration, pressure and temperature changes on equilibrium mixtures as well as describe the equilibrium constant and use it to determine whether equilibrium has been established, and calculate equilibrium constants from equilibrium concentrations and vice versa. Describe the different models of acids and base behavior and the molecular basis for acid strength, as well as apply equilibrium principles to aqueous solutions, including acid/base and solubility reactions, and calculate pH and species concentrations in buffered and unbuffered solutions. Explain titration curves as well as calculate concentrations of reactants. Explain and calculate the thermodynamic functions, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy, for a chemical system, and relate these functions to equilibrium constants Student Learning Outcomes – Laboratory Demonstrate and apply concepts associated with laboratory safety, including the possible consequences of not adhering to appropriate safety guidelines. Demonstrate the computational skills needed to perform appropriate laboratory related calculations to include, but not be limited to determining the number of significant figures in numerical value with the correct units, solving problems using values represented in exponential notation, solving dimensional analysis problems, and manipulating mathematical formulas as needed to determine the value of a variable. Perform laboratory observations (both qualitative and quantitative) using sensory experience and appropriate measurement instrumentation (both analog and digital). Prepare solutions with an acceptable accuracy to a known concentration using appropriate glassware. Perform basic laboratory operations related to, but not limited to, colligative properties of solutions, chemical equilibria, acid/base titrations, electrochemistry. Draw conclusions based on data and analyses from laboratory experiments. Relate laboratory experimental observations, operations, calculations, and findings to theoretical concepts presented in the complementary lecture course.

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CHEM 1226. General Chemistry II Lecture and Laboratory for CHEM Majors

4 Credits (3+3P)

As the second of a two-semester sequence, this course teaches fundamental concepts in chemistry, including solutions, equilibria, electrochemistry, thermodynamics and kinetics. Designed for majors in chemical and other physical sciences, including engineering. May be appropriate for the life science major. It is assumed that the students are familiar with college algebra, chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, and scientific measurements. The laboratory component is designed to complement the theory and concepts presented in lecture, and will introduce students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in CHEM 1216.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the colligative properties of solutions and explain them using intermolecular forces. Determine solution concentrations using colligative property values and vice versa. Explain rates of reactions, rate laws, and half-life; determine the rate, rate law and rate constant of a reaction and calculate concentration as a function of time and vice versa. Understand the principle of catalysis. Explain the collision model of reaction dynamics, including activation energy, catalysts and temperature; Derive a rate law from a reaction mechanism and evaluate the consistency of a mechanism with a given rate law. Describe the dynamic nature of chemical equilibrium and its relation to reaction rates; apply Le Chatelier’s Principle to predict the effect of concentration, pressure and temperature changes on equilibrium mixtures. Describe the equilibrium constant and use it to determine whether equilibrium has been established; calculate equilibrium constants from equilibrium concentrations (including pressures) and vice versa. Describe the different models of acids and base behavior, and the molecular basis for acid strength.

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CHEM 2111. Explorations in Chemistry

1 Credit (1)

The major intent of this course is to deepen your interest in chemistry and make you aware of research and career opportunities in the field. During this semester we hope to discuss both old and new developments in chemistry that impact our lives. We also want to build our communication skills that are so necessary in our profession. Graded S/U.

CHEM 2115. Survey of Organic Chemistry and Laboratory

4 Credits (3+3P)

This course is a one -semester survey of organic and biological chemicals. Students will be introduced to nomenclature, molecular structure, properties, and reactions of hydrocarbons, alcohols, carbonyls, organic acids and bases, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. The handling of organic chemicals, simple organic reactions, tests for functional groups, and synthesis will be learned in the laboratory component of this course.

Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1225G or CHEM 1226.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify common organic functional groups. Translate between the IUPAC names and structures of simple organic molecules. Predict the products of certain organic chemical reactions from reagents and conditions presented. Predict physical and chemical behavior of organic molecules based on structure. Synthesize several classes of organic compounds in the laboratory that were previously studied in the lecture component of this course. Recognize and name the four basic bioorganic units and certain of their derivatives and macromolecules. Construct 3 dimensional models of organic compounds. Understand and apply safety principles associated with Organic Chemistry laboratory operations and activities. Present experimental results in laboratory reports of appropriate length, style and depth, or through other modes as required. 1 Draw/recognize stereochemistry and explain its relevance to bioorganic molecules.

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CHEM 2120. Integrated Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry

3 Credits (3)

This course is a one- semester introduction to Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry designed for students in health and environmental occupations. The course surveys organic compounds in terms of structure, physical, and chemical properties, followed by coverage of the chemistry of specific classes of organic compounds in the biological environment. Students will apply course concepts to everyday organic and biological chemistry problems in preparation for careers in health and environmental fields.

Prerequisite: CHEM 1120G or CHEM 1215G.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify and name basic organic compounds.
  2. Construct/draw organic compounds from the names.
  3. Predict the products of certain organic chemical reactions from reagents and conditions presented.
  4. Recognize and name the four basic bioorganic units and certain of their derivatives and macromolecules.
  5. Compare and contrast the function and location of the four bioorganic units and their macromolecules and cofactors.
  6. Draw/recognize stereochemistry and explain its relevance to bioorganic molecules.
  7. Discuss the pathways and functions of some of the cellular metabolic processes.
  8. Recognize and describe metabolic cellular processes and macromolecular structure with respect to health and/or disease state

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CHEM 2226. General Chemistry III

3 Credits (2+3P)

Quantitative aspects of general chemistry: solid state structure, equilibrium, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Required of chemical science majors who have taken CHEM 1215G/1225G.

Prerequisite: CHEM 1225G.

Learning Outcomes
  1. describe the process of scientific inquiry
  2. solve problems scientifically
  3. communicate scientific information
  4. apply quantitative analysis to scientific problems
  5. apply scientific thinking to real world problems

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CHEM 2991. Introduction to Research

1-3 Credits (3+9P)

Techniques and procedures of chemical research. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

Prerequisites: 8 credits of chemistry and a 3.0 GPA in chemistry.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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CHEM 2996. Special Topics in Chemistry

1-6 Credits (1-6)

Specific subjects in Chemistry. These subjects will be announced in the 'Schedule of Classes'. It may be repeated under different topics for a maximum of 12 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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CHEM 303. Organic Supplemental Instruction I

1 Credit (1)

Collaborative workshop for students in Organic Chemistry I. Course does not count toward departmental degree requirements. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits.

Corequisite(s): CHEM 313.

CHEM 304. Organic Supplemental Instruction II

1 Credit (1)

Collaborative workshop for students in Organic Chemistry II. Course does not count toward departmental degree requirements. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits.

Corequisite(s): CHEM 314.

CHEM 313. Organic Chemistry I

3 Credits (3)

Nomenclature, uses, basic reactions, and preparation methods of the most important classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in CHEM 1225G or CHEM 1226.

CHEM 314. Organic Chemistry II

3 Credits (3)

An in-depth focus on reactions and mechanisms as they relate to organometallic compounds, alcohols, ethers, ketones, aldehydes, carboxylic acid derivatives, an amines. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in CHEM 313.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify several new functional groups and other key features of organic compounds Interpret 1H / 13C NMR, IR, UV-Vis, and Mass spectrometry data and have the ability to correlate structural elements with spectral features Understand the chemical reactivity and reaction mechanisms relating, but not limited, to organometallic compounds, alcohols, ethers, ketones, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and amines. Mechanistic highlights include: etherification, acetal formation / removal, alcohol oxidation, carbonyl addition reactions, enolate (and related) reactions, formation of carboxylic acid derivatives, and nucleophilic acyl substitution processes. Apply these mechanistic and reactivity considerations to these same groups when they appear as substructures in larger biologically-important molecules (e.g. carbohydrates, amino acids, and lipids). Design concise, three to five step syntheses of simple organic molecules using reactions learned in both CHEM 313 and 314 Qualitatively assess stability, solubility properties, chemical reactivity, spectral properties, and potential reactions that would lead to preparation, simply via visual inspection of structure.

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CHEM 315. Organic Chemistry Laboratory

2 Credits (6P)

Techniques, preparative and analytical methods in organic chemistry. May be repeated up to 2 credits.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): CHEM 314. Prerequisite(s): C- or better in CHEM 313 or consent of instructor.

CHEM 351. Special Topics

1-3 Credits

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CHEM 356. Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Occurrence and properties of the elements and the chemistry of their compounds.

Prerequisite(s): (CHEM 1225G or CHEM 1226) and (CHEM 2115 or CHEM 313).

CHEM 357. Synthetic Inorganic Laboratory

2 Credits (6P)

Explores synthesis and analysis of main group and transition metal inorganic compounds. Inorganic laboratory and spectroscopic techniques will be used.

Prerequisites: CHEM 356.

CHEM 371. Analytical Chemistry

4 Credits (2+6P)

The fundamentals of quantitative chemical analysis.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in CHEM 1225G or CHEM 1226.

CHEM 422. Environmental Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Chemistry of organic and metal ion pollutants in the environment and principles important to their remediation including bioremediation. Restricted to: Main campus only. Crosslisted with: ENVS 422

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1225G and either CHEM 2115 or CHEM 313.

CHEM 424. Soil Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Same as SOIL/GEOL 424.

CHEM 431. Physical Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Principles that govern the physical and chemical behavior of matter. May not be counted toward Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1226 or CHEM 2226; MATH 1521G; PHYS 1240G or PHYS 2240G or PHYS 2140 or PHYS 1320G.

CHEM 431 H. Physical Chemistry Honors

3 Credits (3)

Same as CHEM 431. Additional work to be arranged.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1226 or CHEM 2226; MATH 1521G or MATH 1521H; PHYS 1240G or PHYS 2240G or PHYS 2140 or PHYS 1320G.

CHEM 433. Physical Chemistry I

3 Credits (3)

Laws and theories underlying chemical phenomena.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1226 or CHEM 2226; MATH 1521G; PHYS 2140 or PHYS 1320G, or consent of instructor.

CHEM 433 H. Physical Chemistry I Honors

3 Credits (3)

Same as CHEM 433. Additional work to be arranged.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1226 or CHEM 2226; MATH 1521G or MATH 1521H; PHYS 2140 or PHYS 1320G, or consent of instructor.

CHEM 434. Physical Chemistry II

3 Credits (3)

Laws and theories underlying chemical phenomena.

Prerequisite: CHME 302 or CHEM 433.

CHEM 435. Physical Chemistry Laboratory

2 Credits (6P)

Prerequisite: concurrent registration in CHEM 434.

CHEM 441. Advanced Research

1-3 Credits (3+9P)

Investigation of chemical problems and the development of special techniques. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

Prerequisites: consent of instructor, 16 credits of chemistry and 3.0 GPA in chemistry for nonmajors.

CHEM 443. Senior Seminar

1 Credit (1)

Discussions of current chemical research, impact of chemistry on society and/or ethics as applied to chemists. Each student will present a written and an oral report on an approved topic.

Prerequisite: CHEM 431 or CHEM 433.

CHEM 451. Special Topics

1-3 Credits

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CHEM 455. Independent Studies

1-3 Credits

Independent studies directed by consulting faculty.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CHEM 456. Inorganic Structure and Bonding

3 Credits (3)

Theoretical principles and a systematic study of the periodic table.

Prerequisite: CHEM 356 or CHEM 431 or CHEM 433.

CHEM 471. Instrumental Methods of Analysis

4 Credits (3+3P)

Analytical techniques, including optical and procedures.

Prerequisites: CHEM 371 and either PHYS 1240G or PHYS 1320G.

CHEM 475. Central Concepts in Chemistry - Safety

1 Credit (1)

Students will obtain university safety training plus departmental-specific safety guidelines for the research laboratory

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students completing this course will be knowledgeable of all safety guidelines delineated by the University, College, and Department.
  2. When possible accident case-studies will be incorporated within the curriculum.

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CHEM 476. Central Concepts in Chemistry - Research Ethics

1 Credit (1)

Students will complete Federal Agency (NSF, NIH, etc.) on-line training modules in responsible conduct in research and discuss relevant case-studies of research misconduct.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Completion of this class will yield researchers fully aware of federal and professional guidelines regarding the ethical conduction and dissemination of data and conclusions.

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CHEM 477. Central Concepts in Chemistry - ProfessionalDevelopment

1 Credit (1)

Students will receive basic instruction in research dissemination strategies (presentations) and career planning.

CHEM 501. Central Concepts in Chemistry - Energy

3 Credits (3)

This course will provide the students with a detailed examination of several topics in chemical energetics. These topics include: (1) basic thermodynamics concepts, (2) statistical thermodynamics (3) chemical equilibria, and (4) intermolecular interactions.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students completing this course will gain an understanding of chemical thermodynamics and equilibria as they relate to all areas of chemistry.

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CHEM 502. Central Concepts in Chemistry - Structure

3 Credits (3)

This course will provide the students with a detailed examination of several topics in chemical reactivity. These topics include: (1) principles of chemical bonding and (2) organic, inorganic and biochemical structure determination.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students completing this course will understand the fundamental components of molecular interactions and their impact on molecular structure and function in all areas of chemistry.
  2. In addition, they will learn the theory and practice of physical techniques used to determine molecular structure.

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CHEM 503. Central Concepts in Chemistry - Dynamics

3 Credits (3)

This course will provide the students with a detailed examination of several topics in chemical reactivity. These topics include: (1) basic kinetic concepts, (2) fundamental gas phase kinetics (3) organic, inorganic and biochemical reaction mechanisms.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students who successfully complete this course will understand the fundamentals of chemical dynamics: from simple gas or solution phase reaction mechanisms to biomolecular interactions.

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CHEM 504. Central Concepts in Chemistry - Measurements

3 Credits (3)

This course will provide the students with a detailed examination of several topics in chemical measurements. These topics include: (1) spectroscopic, electrochemical and chromatographic techniques, (2) statistical methods of measurement and validation relevant to biomolecules, synthetic polymers and mixtures.

Learning Outcomes
  1. The collection of quantitative data is central to all subdisciplines of chemistry.
  2. Students completing this course will understand the basic principles of chemical measurements and the uncertainties inherently associated with those measurements.
  3. They will also gain knowledge of tools available to minimize those uncertainties in data interpretation.

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CHEM 507. Chemistry of the Elements

3 Credits (3)

Discussion of the reactions and structures of inorganic compounds.

CHEM 510. Graduate Student Seminar

1 Credit (1)

Research seminar for graduate students in Chemistry. Enrollment required each semester for all graduate students. Masters or Doctoral candidates presenting a research seminar enroll for a letter grade. All other participating students enroll using the S/U grading option.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Graduate students will gain experience organizing a research presentation. Graduate students will develop oral presentation skills.

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CHEM 514. Organic Structure Determination

3 Credits (3)

Modern spectroscopic techniques for characterization of organic compounds.

CHEM 515. Modern Organic Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Recent developments in synthesis and theoretical principles of organic chemistry.

CHEM 516. Physical Organic Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Physical organic chemistry.

CHEM 520. Comprehensive Literature Review Seminar for Graduate Students

1 Credit (1)

Graduate student presents a literature review on an approved topic. The seminar presentation will include cover new developments of primary significance to the topic based on current research papers and culminate in a testable hypothesis. A passing grade allows the student to take the comprehensive exam.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Student will prepare an abstract of their presentation understandable to a broad chemistry/biochemistry audience Student will demonstrate a reasonable understanding of every concept introduced Student will present a well-organized topic leading to a logical hypothesis Student will demonstrate the ability to develop a data-supported hypothesis

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CHEM 521. Chemical Instrumentation

3 Credits (2+3P)

Theory and application of electronic devices to chemical analysis.

CHEM 526. Advanced Analytical Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Equilibria, and the theories of gravimetric, volumetric, and instrumental analysis.

CHEM 527. Separations

3 Credits (3)

Covers the fundamentals of separation methods and relationships to modern analytical techniques such as gas chromatography and liquid chromatography.

CHEM 529. Spectrochemical Analysis

3 Credits (3)

Fundamentals, instrumentation, and applications of spectrochemical analysis.

CHEM 537. Quantum Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Fundamentals of quantum mechanics.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CHEM 538. Chemical Kinetics

3 Credits (3)

Empirical analysis of rate measurements, collision theory, transition state theory, and chain reactions.

CHEM 598. Special Research Programs

1-3 Credits

Individual investigations, either analytical or experimental. Graded S/U.

CHEM 599. Master's Thesis

15 Credits

Thesis preparation.

CHEM 600. Research

1-15 Credits

Course used for assigning credit for research performed prior to successful completion of the doctoral qualifying examination.

CHEM 619. Topics in Organic Chemistry

1-3 Credits

Selected topics of current interest designated by subtitle.

CHEM 629. Advanced Topics in Analytical Chemistry

3 Credits (3)

Discussion of advanced topics in the field of analytical chemistry. May be repeated with different subtitles. Consent of instructor required.

CHEM 639. Topics in Physical Chemistry

1-3 Credits

Selected topics of current interest designated by subtitle.

CHEM 700. Doctoral Dissertation

17 Credits

Dissertation preparation.