General Engineering

Associate of Science Degree

The job market for qualified engineering professionals has entered a new age. Regardless of industry trends and forecasts, one thing remains certain—engineers are an essential component to developing new ideas, and furthering the many fields of engineering. From mechanical engineering to environmental engineering, to civil engineering, there is opportunity for graduates to put their professional practice where passion lies.

If a student has thought about the field of engineering or any of its many subfields as a career, an associate degree can be a good starting point to pursue higher education. Within an associate’s degree program, students become familiar with the many subfields of engineering, allowing them to identify where their specific professional interests lie when they progress to a four-year institution.

The small classes at DACC result in a student/instructor ratio that allows personal interaction, which strengthens the educational process. This is particularly a great benefit in higher levels of math and science courses. Community colleges have a higher retention rate and success rate. In addition, the cost of attending a community college for the first two years greatly reduces the cost of an engineering degree.

The General Engineering degree is designed to provide students a set of courses that will articulate into the four-year engineering programs at New Mexico State University, the University of New Mexico, and New Mexico Tech as well as the Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology at New Mexico State University. This program will make available to a far wider range of students the ability to pursue their dreams of becoming engineers. Within the program, they will learn the business aspects of engineering, a foundation of what it takes to be successful in the field and the trends in a growing, energy-conscience market.

Once students have completed the associate’s degree, they are well on their way to a bachelor’s degree program in their selected field. The individual students must work closely with an Advisor to select the best options for successful transition to the four-year institution of their choice.

For high school students who are interested in a career in engineering, courses in mathematics and science are essential.

ENGR 100G. Introduction to Engineering

3 Credits (2+3P)

An introduction to the various engineering disciplines, the engineering approach to problem solving, and the design process. Projects emphasize the importance of teamwork, written & oral communication skills, as well as ethical responsibilities. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1220G or above.

ENGR 100GH. Introduction to Engineering Honors

3 Credits (2+3P)

An introduction to the various engineering disciplines, the engineering approach to problem solving, and the design process. Projects emphasize the importance of teamwork, written & oral communication skills, as well as ethical responsibilities. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Crosslisted with: ENGR 100.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1220G or above.

ENGR 110. Introduction to Engineering Design

3 Credits (2+3P)

Sketching and orthographic projection. Covers detail and assembly working drawings, dimensioning, tolerance specification, and design project

ENGR 111. Mathematics for Engineering Applications

3 Credits (3)

An introduction to engineering mathematics and basic programming skills needed to perform elementary data manipulation and analysis. Consent of Instructor required.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 1250G. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1220G.

ENGR 198. Special Topics in Engineering

1-3 Credits

Directed individual study of topics in engineering. Written reports covering work required. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Restricted to engineering majors. Graded S/U.

Prerequisite: consent of academic dean.

ENGR 233. Engineering Mechanics I

3 Credits (3)

Engineering mechanics using vector methods. Force systems, resultants, equilibrium, distributed forces, area moments, and friction.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): PHYS 1310G. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1521G or MATH 1521H.

ENGR 234. Engineering Mechanics II

3 Credits (3)

Kinetics of particles, kinematics and kinetics rigid bodies, systems of particles, energy and momentum principles, and kinetics of rigid bodies in three dimensions.

Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): MATH 2530G. Prerequisite(s): M E 236, C E 233, or ENGR 233.

Name: Luis Meza, Department Chair

Office Location: DAWD 116A

Phone: (575) 527-7599

Website: https://dacc.nmsu.edu/engr/