PHIL-PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)

PHIL 1115G. Introduction to Philosophy

3 Credits (3)

In this course, students will be introduced to some of the key questions of philosophy through the study of classical and contemporary thinkers. Some of the questions students might consider are: Do we have free will? What is knowledge? What is the mind? What are our moral obligations to others? Students will engage with and learn to critically assess various philosophical approaches to such questions.

PHIL 1120G. Logic, Reasoning, & Critical Thinking

3 Credits (3)

The purpose of this course is to teach students how to analyze, critique, and construct arguments.The course includes an introductory survey of important logical concepts and tools needed for argument analysis. These concepts and tools will be use to examine select philosophical and scholarly texts.

PHIL 1140G. Quest for God

3 Credits (3)

An effort to understand the religious life; a consideration of some of the traditional approaches to God and what it means to be religious.

PHIL 1145G. Philosophy, Law, and Ethics

3 Credits (3)

An introduction to practical problems in moral, social, political, and legal philosophy. Topics to be discussed may include ecology, animal rights, pornography, hate speech on campus, same-sex marriage, justice, abortion, terrorism, treatment of illegal immigrants, and New Mexican Aboriginal Peoples' land claims.

PHIL 1155G. Philosophy of Music

3 Credits (3)

This is an introductory course in the philosophy of music. This course will survey three questions: What is music? Why is music important? How can we distinguish good music from bad music? We will draw examples from a wide variety of musical genres, from classical music, jazz and blues to punk and rap. Students will be encouraged to apply philosophical theorizing to think about their preferred musical form.

PHIL 2110G. Introduction to Ethics

3 Credits (3)

This course introduces students to the philosophical study of morality and will explore questions concerning our human obligations to others and related issues. Students may be asked to relate various approaches to ethics to present-day ethical debates and their own lives.

PHIL 2230G. Philosophical Thought

3 Credits (3)

In this course, students will grapple with some of the key questions of philosophy through the study of classical and contemporary thinkers. Students will become familiar with the perennial problems in subfields of philosophy such as metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and aesthetics. They will learn to approach these problems both critically and sympathetically.