ANTH-ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)

ANTH 1115G. Introduction to Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

Anthropology is the systematic study of the humanity both past and present. The course introduces students to the four subfields of anthropology, which include archaeology, biological, linguistic and cultural anthropology. Students will learn about the concepts and methods that anthropologists use to study our species and gain a broader perspective on the human experience.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe and summarize terms, approaches, and cultural and biological adaptations in the four subfields of anthropology. Explain and analyze conceptual and ethical arguments in the four subfields of anthropology. Effectively communicate content, perspectives, and ideas in four subfields of anthropology. Critically evaluate sources, approaches, and arguments in the four subfields of anthropology.

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ANTH 1135G. Introduction to Biological Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

This course provides a basic introduction to the broad field of biological anthropology. The research interests of biological anthropologists include the history and development of modern evolutionary biology, molecular and population genetics, modern primates, the primate and human fossil record, and modern human biological diversity.

Corequisite(s): ANTH 1135L.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Summarize the basic principles of evolution and recognize how they apply to the human species. Recognize the biological and behavioral continuity of humans with all life, and especially other modern primate species. Identify ways in which the human species is biologically and behaviorally unique. Summarize fossil evidence for human evolution. Distinguish the major Paleolithic industries and outline the behavioral and cognitive changes indicated by the fossil and archeological evidence. Critically evaluate popular accounts of human variation and human evolution. Interpret modern human dilemmas (e.g., overpopulation, co-evolution of disease, and genetic engineering) from an evolutionary perspective. Discuss in class and analyze in writing scholarly arguments concerning course concepts.

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ANTH 1135L. Introduction to Biological Anthropology Lab

1 Credit (2P)

This laboratory course expand on the topics covered in lecture course and uses scientific methods and principles to examine evidence for the process of evolution, the nature of heredity, human evolutionary history and family tree relationships, primate ecology and behavior, and modern human diversity. Hands-on experience with fossil and skeletal material will be an important part of the learning process. Corequisite(s): ANTH 1135G

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method. Employ principles of Mendelian genetics to determine genotype and phenotype probabilities, and calculate gene, genotype, and phenotype frequencies using the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium formula. Demonstrate an understanding of cell structure and functions. Use common lab and anthropometric equipment such as a compound microscope and calipers. Discuss primate evolution, and compare and contrast members of the Primate order in terms of structure, behavior, and phylogeny. Classify hominid species based upon selected traits such as anatomical changes associated with bipedalism, changes in the size and structure of the brain, and the development of culture. Locate and describe the major bones of the human skeleton, and identify characteristics of human skeletons or skulls such as gender, age, and ancestry. Discuss current research in genome analysis of various hominid populations.

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ANTH 1136. Introduction to Historic Preservation

3 Credits (3)

Introduction to historic preservation, its history, goals, methods, legal basis, and economic importance. Explores public role in decision-making. Community Colleges only.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand why historic preservation is important;
  2. be familiar with what is important to preserve;
  3. know who among the general public, state, and federal governments is responsible for preserving the past;
  4. Have gained experience in how we all preserve.

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ANTH 1137G. Human Ancestors

3 Credits (3)

Evolutionary history of the human species from its origin in the primate order, with primary emphasis on the evolution of humankind during the past three million years. Examination of the social lives of apes and consideration of similarities to and differences from them. Biological foundations of human behavior, emphasizing thought, movement, and interaction.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the evolution of the human species, from its origin in the primate order to the emergence of Homo sapiens, and to the present-day.
  2. Describe the social lives of apes and identify similarities to and differences between apes and humans.
  3. Explain the biological foundations of human behavior.

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ANTH 1140G. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

3 Credits (3)

This is an introductory course that provides an overview of cultural anthropology as a subfield within the broader discipline of anthropology and as a research approach within the social sciences more generally. The course presents core concepts and methods of cultural anthropology that are used to understand the ways in which human beings organize and experience their lives through distinctive cultural practices. More specifically, this course explores social and cultural differences and similarities around the world through a variety of topics such as: language and communication, economics, ways of making a living, marriage and family, kinship and descent, race, ethnicity, political organization, supernatural beliefs, sex and gender, and globalization. This course ultimately aims to present a broad range of perspectives and practices of various cultural groups from across the globe.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Introduce students to the basic concepts and research methods of cultural anthropology as one of the disciplines of social science, including fundamental concepts, such as culture and society, which form the pillars of the discipline (e.g., cultural relativism, cultural persistence and change, world-view and enculturation). Comprehend the importance of studying cultural anthropology. Demonstrate knowledge of the practice of anthropological research in the modern world that is increasingly multicultural, transnational and globally interconnected (e.g., globalization and modern world system). Demonstrate an awareness of how students’ own cultures shape their experiences and the way they see the world, as well as help them understand and interact with other cultures. Understand how beliefs, values and assumptions are influenced by culture, biology, history, economic, and social structures. Gain a sense of relationship with people possessing different experiences from their own. Gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for cultural anthropology as a broad discipline through learning about its practices, and differentiating cultural anthropology from other disciplines that study

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ANTH 1160G. World Archaeology

3 Credits (3)

This course is an exploration of human evolution and cultural development throughout the world. Students will be introduced to basic anthropological methods and theories and will learn how anthropological research has contributed to our understanding of major themes in human prehistory, including human evolution, the origins of culture, migration and colonization, animal and plant domestication, and the rise and fall of civilizations.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe and explain the major developments in human prehistory.
  2. Identify and describe major archaeological cultures throughout the world.
  3. Employ critical thinking skills in the evaluation of competing theories about the past.
  4. Select and use relevant archaeological evidence to explain how prehistoric populations adapted to their natural and cultural environments.
  5. Demonstrate competency in written communication.

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ANTH 2140G. Indigenous Peoples of North America

3 Credits (3)

This course is a general survey of the history and ethnology of indigenous groups in North America. The course is designed to give students a comprehensive view of major issues pertaining to the indigenous cultures of North America, such as family structure, social organization, subsistence and contemporary economies, environmental adaptation, Indian-White relations, religious practices, and contemporary issues.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate familiarity with common elements pertaining to the languages and social organization of indigenous peoples in North America.
  2. Recognize fundamental differences and similarities among traditional indigenous cultures.
  3. Describe social relations of indigenous peoples in relationship to other ethnic groups.
  4. Identify and analyze important ways that European societies and cultures and indigenous societies and cultures interacted from the time of Columbus to the present.
  5. Evaluate the impacts of Euroamerican policies and programs on indigenous cultures.
  6. Distinguish major social issues facing contemporary indigenous communities in North America.
  7. Understand objectives and limitations of cross-cultural analysis in anthropology as they relate to the study of indigenous peoples in North America.
  8. Demonstrate research and communication skills as they relate to the study of indigenous peoples in North America.

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ANTH 2150. Indigenous Peoples of the American Southwest

3 Credits (3)

This course is a study of indigenous cultural groups of the American Southwest. Students will explore historical and contemporary cultural and social patterns of American Indian, Hispanic and Anglo-American groups.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe socio-cultural developments, geographic environments, and characteristics of major cultural groups that currently inhabit the American Southwest.
  2. Recognize underlying similarities as well as the wide range of variability of the cultural groups in the American Southwest.
  3. Recognize the impacts and effects of Euroamerican colonization on indigenous cultural groups in the American Southwest.
  4. Describe the historical interactions and accommodations among indigenous cultural groups in the American Southwest.
  5. Examine the processes of cultural change within major cultural groups in the American Southwest.
  6. Identify and analyze some of the contemporary issues faced by major cultural groups in the American Southwest.

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ANTH 2996. Special Topics

1-4 Credits

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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