The NMSU System Academic Regulations

The following regulations are effective with the publication of all the NMSU system catalogs, this includes the Las Cruces-Academic Catalog, Alamogordo Community College, Carlsbad Community College, Dona Ana Community College, and the Grants Community College catalogs. All regulations in this section of the catalog pertain to all the campuses housed with the NMSU System, this means that information for students pursuing Associate Degrees/Certificates, Bachelor's Degree, and Graduate Degrees/Certificates is within the section of the catalog.

The regulations section is broken down into different areas:

  • Academic Programs of Study
  • Registration
  • Academic Performance and Progress
  • Grading
  • Withdrawals
  • Degree Applications, Graduation & Commencement
  • Academic Standing and Probation
  • Academic Misconduct and Grievances
  • The Registrar's Office

Academic Appeals

Academic Appeals Board

Within each college of the university or the library, an academic appeals board will be appointed by the associate dean for academics to hear student appeals. The appeals board will consist of three faculty members and two students.

NMSU GRANTS has created an Academic Misconduct Appeals Committee (AMAC). Refer to grants.nmsu.edu for current forms and protocol.

Academic Misconduct

Students at NMSU are expected to observe and maintain the highest academic, ethical, and professional standards of conduct. Any student found guilty of academic misconduct shall be subject to disciplinary action. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to, the following actions:

  1. Cheating or knowingly assisting another student in committing an act of cheating or other forms of academic dishonesty
  2. Plagiarism, which includes, but is not necessarily limited to: submitting examinations, themes, reports, drawings, laboratory notes, undocumented quotations, computer-processed materials, or other material as one’s own work when such work has been prepared by another person or copied from another person.
  3. Unauthorized possession of examinations, reserve library materials, or laboratory materials.
  4. Unauthorized changing of grades on an examination, in an instructor’s grade book, or on a grade report or unauthorized access to academic computer records.
  5. Nondisclosure or misrepresentation in filling out applications or other university records in, or for, academic departments or colleges.

Maintenance of Records

Instructors and/or departments shall keep records used to compute individual grades for two years after the completion of a course. If a grade has been appealed, these records shall be kept for at least two years after completion of the appeal. Departments, colleges or library may require that records be kept for longer periods.

Procedure for Initiating Grievance Complaints

This procedure has been established to provide a method to resolve undergraduate student grievances at the lowest administrative level in a fair and expeditious manner. For the purpose of this procedure, grievances are limited to alleged violations of university policy or procedures by the university or its employees, disputes with faculty and/or alleged unfair treatment. Usually this method is used to appeal a grade the student feels was not justified. Under no condition should these policies be used when the student has allegedly violated the University Code of Conduct or a contractual agreement, and at no hearing should either party have a lawyer. Any student who believes that he/she has been unjustly treated within the academic process may proceed as far as necessary in the steps detailed below. Should the alleged grievance not involve a faculty member or course, the student is to appeal directly to the department head or associate dean for academics in whose area or college the alleged grievance occurred.

  1. Appeal to the faculty member: The student is to submit a written appeal to the faculty member within 30 days after the start of the semester following the semester in which the alleged grievance occurred. Semester in this case refers to fall and spring only. If the alleged grievance occurs during the summer session, the student is to submit an appeal no later than 30 days into the fall semester following the summer session in which the alleged grievance occurred. The faculty member and the student are to discuss the problem. The faculty member will submit a written report outlining his or her decision to the student and department head or appropriate unit designee within ten working days of receiving the student’s written appeal.
  2. Appeal to the department head or appropriate unit designee: If a decision satisfactory to the student cannot be reached, the student may submit a written appeal to the department head or appropriate unit designee in which the course in question is taught. This is to be done within ten days of the receipt of the faculty member’s written decision. The faculty member, the department head or appropriate unit designee, and the student are to meet to discuss the problem. The department head or appropriate unit designee will send a written response outlining his or her decision to the student and faculty member within ten days of this meeting.
  3. Appeals to the associate dean for academics or associate dean of the library: If a satisfactory decision cannot be reached among the department head or appropriate unit designee, the faculty member, and the student, the student or the faculty member may submit a written state of appeal to the associate dean for academics of the college in which the course was taught. This is to be done within ten working days after the receipt of the written decision by the department head. The associate dean may request a written recommendation from an Academic Appeals Board. Should this be the case, the Academic Appeals Board will conduct a hearing with the student and faculty member (not necessarily at the same time) to review the merits of the appeal. They may also ask for supporting evidence for or against the appeal. The Academic Appeals Board will submit the written recommendation to the associate dean within five working days following the conclusion of their process. The associate dean may meet with the student, faculty member, and department head to discuss the appeal (not necessarily at the same time). The associate dean will submit a written response outlining his or her decision to the student, faculty member, department head, and dean within ten days of the last meeting.
  4. Appeals to the dean: The dean of the college or library in which the course is taught or in whose college the alleged grievance occurred may, at his or her discretion, review the appeal upon the written request of the student or faculty member and render a final decision. An appeal to the dean is the last step in the appeals process and the dean’s decision cannot be appealed further. Should the dean not choose to review the appeal, the decision of the associate dean for academics or associate dean of the library is final.
  5. Exceptions to the time involved: The associate dean for academics or associate dean of the library may waive the normal time frame for appeals for compelling reasons. Regardless of circumstances, academic appeals must be initiated with the course instructor within two years of the conclusion of the semester or summer session in which the course was taken.
  6. Enrollment: A student need not be enrolled at the university to initiate an appeal.

Academic Standing

When students do not maintain adequate academic standing, they begin a progress of Academic Warning to Academic Probation I and II, and finally to Academic Suspension. Each stage imposes more structure and limitations on the student in order to help them return to normal academic standing. The intent is not to punish, but to help the student return to normal academic standing and success. Since some of these limitations involve limitations on the number of credit hours, students on Probation or Suspension may be subject to loss of financial aid. It is the responsibility of the student to determine the impact of their changed academic standing on their financial aid. Notification to students of academic warning, probation, or suspension appears on the student’s grade report at the end of each grading period.

Academic Probation I

This occurs when a student under Academic Warning has a semester GPA less than 2.0, and the cumulative GPA remains below 2.0 at the conclusion of the semester or if the student maintains a semester GPA greater than 2.0 while on Academic Probation I but the cumulative GPA is still less than 2.0.

Under Academic Probation I the following conditions apply:

  1. The student cannot enroll in more than 13 hours of coursework during the semester. Note: Students falling below 12 credits in any one semester will jeopardize their financial aid. Should this occur, students should see the associate dean in their college as soon as possible to try to implement corrective measures.
  2. The student will enter into a contract or individualized education plan with their advisor and approved by the associate dean or CAO that place further stipulations on Academic Probation I. The associate dean or CAO may place the student on Academic Probation II or Academic Suspension should the student not adhere to the stipulations of the contract.
  3. Students on Academic Probation receiving educational benefits from the Veterans’ Administration must obtain counseling from the Military & Veterans Programs Office.
  4. Students admitted under special provisions whose transcripts indicate less than a 2.0 GPA are admitted on Academic Probation I.

The student must maintain a semester GPA equal to or greater than 2.0 until such time that the cumulative GPA is greater than 2.0 at which time the student goes back to good academic standing. Until the latter happens the student remains on Academic Probation I. The student will be placed on Academic Probation II if unable to maintain a 2.0 semester GPA, and the cumulative remains below a 2.0 GPA, while under Academic Probation I. A student on Academic Probation I remains eligible for all extracurricular activities as governed by the rules of the specific activity.

Academic Probation II

Issued when a student falls below a semester 2.0 GPA, and the cumulative remains below a 2.0 GPA, while on Academic Probation I, or, if the student maintains a semester GPA greater than 2.0 while on Academic Probation II but the cumulative GPA is still less than 2.0.

  1. The student cannot enroll in more than 7 hours of coursework during the semester.
  2. As with rule 2 under Academic Warning and Academic Probation I and at the discretion of the associate dean or CAO, the student will be required to enter into a contract with their advisor, approved by the associate dean or CAO, to place further stipulations on Academic Probation II.

The associate dean or CAO may place the student on Academic Suspension should the student not adhere to the stipulations of the contract.

The student must maintain a semester 2.0 GPA or higher until the cumulative GPA reaches a 2.0 or higher at which time they are placed on good academic standing. A student unable to maintain a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher, and the cumulative remains below 2.0 GPA, while under Probation II will be placed on Suspension. A student on Academic Probation II remains eligible for all extracurricular activities as governed by the rules of the specific activity.

Academic Suspension

When a student does not achieve a semester 2.0 GPA or higher, and the cumulative remains below a 2.0 while under Academic Probation II, they are placed on Academic Suspension. Students under Academic Suspension are not allowed to take NMSU courses while under suspension. Students on Academic Suspension must sit out a minimum of 1 semester and then petition the Provost or designee to be removed from Academic Suspension. At this time the suspension status will be evaluated for possible removal. Should the suspension be lifted, the student is placed on Academic Probation II until such time as the cumulative GPA equals or exceeds a 2.0. At the discretion of the Provost or designee, the student will enter into a contract approved by the Provost or designee and the student’s Dean or CAO, setting stipulations to have the suspension removed. Failure to adhere to the contract will return the student to Academic Suspension.

Under certain conditions, a student may be re-admitted at NMSU under regular status while under Academic Suspension when satisfactory progress has been demonstrated at another college or university (see Readmission- Degree Seeking). Credits earned at another university or college while under Academic Suspension from NMSU or another university or college will be accepted at NMSU only after the student demonstrates satisfactory progress over a period of two semesters after being re-admitted or admitted to NMSU. Acceptance of transfer credits that count toward degree requirements is still governed by the rules established by the student’s respective college or campus.

Academic Warning

Issued only once, the first time a student's cumulative GPA falls below a 2.0 while in good academic standing. The relevant Associate Dean for Academics or Campus Academic Officer (CAO) will send the student a letter detailing the consequences should the cumulative grade point remain below a 2.0 at the conclusion of the semester. A student on Academic Warning remains eligible for all extracurricular activities as governed by the rules of the specific activity.

While under Academic Warning the following restrictions apply:

  1. The student may be required to enroll in a 3-hour special study skills/time management course specifically designed for students on Academic Warning, or an equivalent course approved by the appropriate associate dean or CAO of their campus.
  2. Students will be required to enter into a contract with their advisor, approved by their department head that places further stipulations on Academic Warning. The contract may include, but is not limited to the following:
  • The student may be required to take at least one repeat course to try to improve their GPA.
  • Except for the special study skills/time management course, the student’s coursework may be restricted to their major.
  • The student may be required to get tutoring help.
  • The student may be required to see an academic counselor on a specified time schedule.
  • The number of hours a student may register for may be restricted (due to extenuating circumstances such as the student’s workload commitments).

The associate dean or CAO may place the student on Academic Probation I should the student not adhere to the stipulations of the contract.

If the student’s semester GPA is less than a 2.0, and the cumulative GPA remains below a 2.0 at the end of the semester on Academic Warning, the student is placed on Academic Probation I. If the semester GPA is greater than 2.0 but the cumulative GPA is still less than 2.0, the student will remain on Academic Warning. If the cumulative GPA is greater than a 2.0 at the end of the semester then the student is returned to good academic standing.

Continuing in Probationary Status

Students may continue to enroll while on Academic Probation I or II provided they maintain a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher. They are continued on that same level of Academic Probation if they withdraw from the university while on Academic Probation.

Disciplinary Probation and Suspension

NMSU expects all students to regard themselves as responsible citizens on campus and in the community.

Repeated misconduct and major violations will cause the student to be subject to immediate suspension or expulsion from the university.

The general rules and regulations applicable to students are in the Student Code of Conduct of the Student Handbook or can be obtained from the Scheduling and Information Desk in Corbett Center.

Effect of Summer Attendance

A student may use summer classes to try to get warning or probationary status removed. Students suspended at the close of the spring semester may have their Academic Suspension rescinded if they attend summer session at NMSU or one of its Community College colleges. Such attendance must raise the combined spring semester and summer GPA to 2.0 or better. Under no circumstances may a student on Academic Warning or Academic Probation be allowed to register for an overload. Academic warning status is continued if the student withdraws from the university and probation or suspension status applies to all subsequent enrollments.

A certification of eligibility to attend summer session at NMSU after a spring semester Academic Suspension is available to the suspended student who wishes to attend summer sessions at other institutions.

Removal of Academic Probation

Such academic standing is removed when the cumulative GPA is raised to 2.0 or higher, with the following exceptions:

  1. A transfer student may not remove probation by summer work alone;
  2. If an I grade is removed after the student has enrolled, the new grade’s effect on academic standing is based on its inclusion with grades for the term for which the student is enrolled;
  3. Exercise of the Adjusted Credit Option does not change academic status until subsequent grades are earned.

General Academic

Attendance and Student Performance

Students are expected to attend regularly all classes for which they are registered. Students making satisfactory progress in their classes will be excused from classes when they are representing NMSU on a university sponsored event (e.g. ASNMSU president representing NMSU at legislative session, student athletes competing in NMSU scheduled athletic events, or students attending educational field trips and conferences). Authorized absences do not relieve the student of their class responsibilities. Prior written notice of the authorized absence will be provided to the instructor by the sponsoring department. Specific class attendance requirements are determined by the instructor of the course.

When the number of absences hinders a student’s progress in a course, the instructor may initiate a statement of the student’s excessive absences including a recommendation of retention or expulsion from the class. Based on the recommendation of the instructor and with the concurrence of the course department head and the student’s academic dean, a student will be dropped for persistent absences or for persistent failure to complete assignments. Similarly, a student may also be dropped from a class for engaging in behavior that interferes with the educational environment of the class. Any student who has been dropped from a class shall have the right to appeal that decision through the Student Academic Grievance Policy.

Only enrolled students, for credit or for audit, are permitted to attend classes. A student who has officially withdrawn from a course may continue to attend the course with the permission of the instructor for the remainder of the semester.

Students not enrolled may visit classes only with the permission of the instructor.

Basic Academic Skills

NMSU requires all students to demonstrate basic academic skills in both English and mathematics to ensure that they have the abilities to succeed in upper-division courses numbered 300 or higher. First-time students are evaluated using ACT or SAT test scores or diagnostic testing at the time of registration to determine basic academic competency. Based upon this evaluation, the university will require entering students to correct deficiencies by completing coursework in English and mathematics before enrolling in courses numbered 300 and above.

Transfer students with 45 or more credits will be allowed to enroll in upper-division courses for one semester. After that point, they must meet both of these requirements before enrolling in upper-division courses. The options for satisfying basic skills in English and mathematics are listed below.

Completion of basic skills requirements will not necessarily satisfy university general education requirements in English and mathematics. Students should consult the General Education Courses and Requirements section in this chapter for these requirements.

English Basic Skill Requirement Options

  • 30 ACT English Score - Students may satisfy basic skills requirements in English by scoring 30 or higher on ACT English exams. However, students must still earn credit for ENGL 111G Rhetoric and Composition by one of these options:
  • ENGL 111G Rhetoric and Composition or ENGL 111GH Rhetoric and Composition Honors - Students may satisfy English basic skills by passing ENGL 111G Rhetoric and Composition or ENGL 111GH Rhetoric and Composition Honors with a grade of C- or higher.
  • CLEP Credit - Students may earn credit for ENGL 111G Rhetoric and Composition or ENGL 111GH Rhetoric and Composition Honors by taking the College Level Examination Program subject exam in freshman college composition with a score of 57 (top quartile) or higher. See Credit by College Level Placement Examination for details.
  • Advanced Placement Credit - Students may receive advanced placement credit for ENGL 111G Rhetoric and Composition or ENGL 111GH Rhetoric and Composition Honors by scoring 3, 4, or 5 on the English Advanced Placement Exam. See “Advanced Placement” for details.
  • Transfer Credits - Students may receive credit for ENGL 111G Rhetoric and Composition by transferring 3 or more credits of college-level English composition, with a grade of C- or above from accredited institutions. International students may be required to satisfy the requirements under ENGL 111 M Rhetoric and Composition for International and Multilingual Students below.
  • Transfer Credits - from Nonaccredited Institutions. Students may receive credit for ENGL 111G Rhetoric and Composition by transferring 3 or more credits of college-level English composition with a grade of C- or higher from a nonaccredited institution, and by writing a theme which is judged adequate by the Department of English.
  • ENGL 111 M Rhetoric and Composition for International and Multilingual Students - International students who took the TOEFL examination must complete ENGL 111 M Rhetoric and Composition for International and Multilingual Students with a satisfactory grade.
  • Developmental Courses - Students who score 12 or below on the ACT English exam must pass two developmental English courses (CCDE 105 N Effective Communication Skills, CCDE 110 N General Composition) before enrolling in ENGL 111G Rhetoric and Composition. Students who score 13 to 15 on the ACT English exam must pass one developmental English course (CCDE 110 N General Composition) before enrolling in ENGL 111G Rhetoric and Composition. Developmental courses are included on the transcript and will be included in the calculation of the GPA; however, credits in developmental courses will not count toward a degree.

Mathematics Basic Skills Requirement Options

  • 23 ACT Mathematics Score - Students may satisfy basic skills requirements in mathematics by scoring 23 or higher on ACT mathematics exams. However, students must still fulfill the general education math requirement.
  • Coursework - Students scoring below 23 on ACT mathematics exams may satisfy basic skills in mathematics by earning a grade of C- or higher in one of the following courses or course combinations:
    • CCDM 112 N Developmental Algebra I and CCDM 113 N Developmental Algebra II;
    • CCDM 114 N Algebra Skills;
    • MATH 111 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics I and MATH 112G Fundamentals of Elementary Math II;
    • any mathematics course numbered 120 or above, which includes A ST 251G Statistics for Business and the Behavioral Sciences, STAT 251G Statistics for Business and the Behavioral Sciences and STAT 271G Statistics for Psychological Sciences.

New students are placed in these courses according to their high school GPAs and their ACT scores in mathematics. However, new engineering students must take the mathematics placement exam (MPE), and any new student may choose to take the MPE to test towards a higher placement. Placement does not earn academic credit, and placement in a mathematics course numbered 120 or higher does not satisfy the basic skills requirement.

  • Basic Skills Exam - Students may take the Basic Skills Exam, which is offered twice a semester by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. A passing score will meet the basic skills requirement, although it will not appear as credit on the student’s transcript.
  • Advanced Placement Credit - Students may receive credit for courses which may satisfy basic skills in mathematics by taking the math Advanced Placement Exam. See Advanced Placement later in this chapter for details.
  • Developmental Courses - Students who score below 23 on the ACT mathematics exam and whose score on the math placement exam, if taken, does not qualify them for placement into university-level mathematics courses will be placed into the appropriate development mathematics course or courses (CCDM). Placement into CCDM course(s) is dependent upon the student's ACT score and high school GPA. Students must pass the CCDM course or courses before enrolling in university-level mathematics courses. Developmental courses are included on the transcript and will be included in the calculation of the GPA; however, credits in developmental courses will not count toward a degree.

Outcomes Assessment - Evaluating Your Academic Progress

New Mexico State University is committed to providing its students with a quality education and a supportive learning environment. Assessment is a process of rigorous review followed by implementation of changes to enhance and improve the quality of education students receive at NMSU. For assessment to be effective, students must be actively aware of, and engaged in, assessment activities. Faculty and staff at NMSU will communicate to students the value and implications of assessment. For their part, students will provide feedback on personal, professional and academic development. Students are expected to participate in all types of assessment when asked to do so. Types of assessment activities include class assignments, course projects, exams, exit interviews, standardized tests, surveys, focus groups, etc. Data gathered through these assessments will be published only in aggregate form. Efforts will be made to inform students of assessment results and the program improvements implemented as a result of assessment.

Privacy Rights

The following information has been designated as directory information and is subject to release to the public under the Buckley Amendment (PL 98-380), “The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974”: student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, and dates of attendance.

Other information regarding disclosure of student data is posted at the Registrar's Office in compliance with the Act.

Requests for withholding directory information must be filed in writing with the Registrar's Office.

Satisfactory Progress

A full-time student is making satisfactory progress when the cumulative number of credits earned at NMSU, divided by the number of semesters attended at NMSU, equals at least 12. Part-time students must earn a proportional number of credits in the same time period for purposes of financial aid. In the case of new freshmen, this definition will not be applied until the beginning of the third semester of enrollment; however, for all other students, it will apply after one semester of enrollment. All students at the end of their second academic year must have a cumulative 2.0 GPA.

Social Security Numbers in Student Records

As required by law, social security numbers are collected from prospective and current students who plan to seek employment on campus or, wish to receive financial aid. In addition, the university is mandated by federal tax regulations to provide tuition and fee payment information to the student and the Internal Revenue Service, so that applicable educational tax credits may be computed. The social security number will be necessary to submit this tax reporting. The social security number is a confidential record and is maintained as such by the university in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

Student Responsibility

The ultimate responsibility for planning an academic program in compliance with university, college, and departmental requirements rests with the student. In addition, the student bears ultimate responsibility for understanding all matters of the Undergraduate Catalog.

Transcripts

An official transcript, the University’s certified statement of your complete NMSU academic record in chronological order by semester and year, includes coursework, grades, and degrees earned. Credit hours earned through transfer work are not listed in detail, but do appear as cumulative totals. Transcripts are available as digitally signed PDFs or printed copies. Transcripts can be ordered online at http://mytranscript.nmsu.edu. A fee is charged. The name on the transcript will be the same as on the official NMSU records. Name changes are processed only for current students. No transcript will be released if the student is in debt to the university.

Transcript evaluation, student records and determination of residency:

Office of the Registrar
MSC 3AR, PO Box 30001
Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001
Phone: (575) 646-3411
http://registrar.nmsu.edu/

Registration and Grading

Adjusted Credit Option

The adjusted credit option allows students who obtain a low grade-point average (less than 2.0 cumulative) during their first few semesters to get a fresh start. This option may be used only once and is not reversible. All courses carrying a grade of S, CR, C-, or better earned prior to the grading period in which the student requests the adjusted credit option (including transfer courses) are included as adjusted credit. All allowable credits are designated on the permanent academic record as “adjusted credit” and are omitted from the calculations of the cumulative grade-point average.

A fee of $10 is required for the submission of an adjusted credit option application. Application forms are available in the offices of the academic deans. Students applying for this option must:

  1. not hold a baccalaureate degree
  2. be currently enrolled as a degree-seeking/nondegree undergraduate student
  3. have a cumulative grade-point average of less than 2.0 at NMSU
  4. have successfully accumulated fewer than 60 transfer plus NMSU credits
  5. exercise the option only during the fall or spring semester before the last day to withdraw from the university
  6. pass an additional 30 graded credits before they may be awarded an associate’s degree.

Other courses taken during the period of credit adjustment are not calculated in the cumulative grade-point average. The repeat rule for courses starts anew for students who have taken the adjusted credit option.

Credits covered by this option are shown on the transcript with an appropriate notation, and all coursework attempted is shown. In no circumstances will a transcript of this record be issued that does not include all courses attempted at this university.

Probationary status and eligibility for on-campus employment is not affected by the exercise of the adjusted credit option.

Students are eligible for university honors if the criteria for university honors are met for all courses taken at NMSU after the period of adjusted credit.

Advanced Placement

Students who have completed college-level courses in secondary schools and have taken the Advanced Placement Examinations of the College Examination Board with resulting composite scores of 3, 4, or 5 may receive college level credit. The amount of credit and the equivalent university courses for which credit will be granted will be determined by the head of the department in which the course is offered. Such credit will be treated as transfer credit without a grade, will count toward graduation, and may be used in fulfilling specific curriculum requirements.

Audits

 A regularly enrolled student may register for any course prior to the last day of registration as an auditor without credit with the consent of instructor, provided the facilities are not required for regular students. The tuition and fees are the same as for credit courses. Audit courses are not considered in determining the maximum load except for students on probation and graduate students. A student may not change from credit to audit after the last day to register but may withdraw and continue to attend with the permission of the instructor.

Changes in Registration

Registration changes may be processed only in accordance with university regulations and with appropriate signatures. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate official withdrawal from a course.

Forms are available from the Academic Advisor or in the Deans’ offices. Courses may not be added or dropped after the cutoff date indicated in the university calendar, with the exception of petitions for retroactive withdrawal processed in accordance with Policy 6.92. For refund policy, see http://uar.nmsu.edu/withdrawals/.

When a student officially drops a course, the W grade is assigned as follows:

  1. No grade is assigned during the registration period.
  2. A W grade is assigned to any student who officially drops a course during the first half of its duration. A student may not officially withdraw from a course after this time.
  3. A grade of W is assigned in all courses to any student officially withdrawing from the university prior to the last three weeks of classes.

A student found insufficiently prepared to carry a regular course may be transferred to a more elementary course in the same field any day before the last day to officially withdraw from an individual course.

Any person attending under Veterans Educational Assistance must notify the Military and Veterans Programs office if dropping or adding courses changes enrollment status for benefits.

Class Load

The normal load in a regular semester (fall or spring) for a main campus student is 12-18 credits. A normal load for a summer term is 6 credits per session for a total of 12 credit hours. Some scholarships may require a 15 credit class load as a minimum requirement to be eligible for that scholarship.

An overload is more than 18 credits for a regular semester and more than 12 credits for the summer term. Written permission must be obtained from the Dean of the student’s college and is required for a student to register for an overload. A one-credit course in physical education may be taken without being included in the calculation for determining an overload. To be eligible to take an overload the student must have no grades less than a C- and a cumulative grade-point average of a 2.5 or higher for the last two semesters. No freshman will be permitted to assume an overload.

Students may only enroll in non-NMSU courses with approval from the Dean of their college and these courses will still be counted as part of a student’s class load.

Class Rank (Classification)

A student’s classification depends upon the number of credits completed toward graduation.

  • Sophomore rank is achieved with successful completion of 28 credits;
  • junior rank, 60 credits;
  • senior rank, 90 credits.

Credit by College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

Prior to or during a student’s enrollment at NMSU, credits may be earned through the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board. CLEP is a national program of credit by examination that offers the opportunity to earn credits for college level achievement wherever or however the student learned.

Earned CLEP credit will be treated as transfer credit without a grade, will count toward graduation, and may be used in fulfilling specific curriculum requirements.

A current NMSU CLEP policy as well as test schedule information is available through Testing Services DACC East Mesa, RM 210. Testing Services may be reached at: (575) 528-7294.

Credit by Examination

Any enrolled student with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 currently attending classes may, with permission of the appropriate department, challenge by examination any undergraduate course in which credit has not been previously earned except an independent study, research or reading course, or any foreign language course that precedes the final course in the lower-division sequence. The manner of administering the examination and granting permission shall be determined by the department in which the course is being challenged.

Students may not enroll in a single course, challenge it by examination, and drop it during the drop/add period, unless they enroll in an additional course. In exceptional cases in which a student demonstrates outstanding ability in a course in which he is already registered, he may be permitted to challenge the course.

A student desiring to apply for special examination may obtain the necessary forms from the Office of the Registrar. The fee for challenging a course is the same as the approved tuition rate.

Courses may not be challenged under the S/U option.

The special examination privilege is based on the principle that the student, exclusively, has the responsibility for preparing for a special examination.

Credit for Military Service

New Mexico State University will award academic credit to United States military personnel for courses and Military Occupational Specialties (MOS), based on the American Council of Education Guide (ACE) as well as through national standardized tests, such as CLEP, AP, PEP and DANTES. Credit for military-training is in accordance with NMSU Faculty Senate Legislation Proposition 24-07/08, which was passed in May 2008. Military Training and Military Occupational Specialties (MOS) must have a recommendation evaluation by ACE (in the ACE Guide) for credit to be awarded. Courses accepted for transfer credit become part of the student’s official NMSU transcript and academic record. If a student wishes to appeal a decision regarding the acceptance of military training/education and/or MOS for academic credit, the student must submit a written statement of appeal to the Dean of the College to which the student has applied. The Dean will review the merits of the appeal and render a decision. The decision of the Dean is final.

Only Primary MOS (s) are eligible for academic credit in the initial review and evaluation. Credit for Duty and/or Secondary MOS may be eligible for academic credit if the student petitions the college’s Associate Dean. Primary MOS is the primary specialty of a soldier and reflects the broadest and most in-depth scope of military experience. Veterans, active-duty personnel, National Guard and Reservists who are current students or students applying for admission to New Mexico State University may be granted academic credit on a case-by-case basis upon evaluation of military transcripts - the Joint Service Transcript (jst.doded.mil) and the Community College of the Air Force transcripts. Course equivalencies and credit hours awarded for a particular NMSU degree are determined by colleges and/or academic departments. Credit hours may be awarded for specific courses toward degree requirement, or as elective credit. The number of credit hours awarded will be determined by the college and/or academic department.

NOTE: Students submitting military transcripts for credit evaluation must keep in mind the Maximum Time Frame policy. See Financial Aid Section.

Grade Point Average

A student’s NMSU semester and cumulative GPAs will be based solely on courses taken at NMSU or under an approved National Student Exchange.

Graduate Study by University Seniors

A student who is in the final semester of a bachelor’s degree program and who is completing all requirements for graduation may take up to 6 credits of graduate-level courses numbered from 450 through 598 for credit toward an advanced degree.

The student must also:

  1. File an Application for Admission to Graduate Student Services and be admitted by a department into a graduate program
  2. Have a grade-point average of 3.0 or better over the most recent semesters in which the last 45 semester hours were completed
  3. File a petition for each course by the deadline to add courses for the semester in which the course was taken
  4. Obtain approval by the instructor, department head, and undergraduate dean

The combined total of graduate and undergraduate courses for the semester may not exceed 17 credits. Students should consult an admission representative at the Graduate Student Services.

If the student is not admitted into a graduate program, the course(s) will remain separate from the undergraduate record. If the student is admitted into a graduate program, the course(s) will become part of the graduate record and will not be used in the calculation of the student’s undergraduate grade-point average or credit hours.

Incomplete Grade

The grade of I (incomplete) is given for passable work that could not be completed due to circumstances beyond the student’s control. The following regulations apply to removing or changing an I grade:

  1. Instructors may assign I grades only if the student is unable to complete the course due to circumstances beyond the student’s control that develop after the last day to withdraw from the course. Examples of appropriate circumstances include documented illness, documented death or crisis in the student’s immediate family, and similar circumstances. Job related circumstances are generally not appropriate grounds for assigning an I grade. In no case is an I grade to be used to avoid the assigning of D, F, U, or RR grades for marginal or failing work.
  2. To assign an I grade, the instructor must complete the I Grade Information Form and have the form delivered to the course dean. The instructor will state in writing on the I Grade Information Form the steps necessary to complete the remaining coursework or the instructor may indicate that the student will be required to re-enroll in the course to receive credit (in which case the I grade will not be removed). The student will sign this document or the course dean will send a copy of the document to the student’s official permanent address as recorded in the Registrar’s Office.
  3. The student is entitled to have the I grade removed from their transcript only if they complete the remaining coursework as specified on the I Grade Information Form, in a manner satisfactory to the instructor. The work must be completed within 12 months after the I grade is assigned and prior to the student’s graduation, or within a shorter period of time if specified by the instructor on the I Grade Information Form. If the student fails to complete the coursework, the instructor may change the I grade to any appropriate grade (including D, F, or U ) provided that the instructor stated that this would occur on the I Grade Information Form.
  4. I grades can be removed from the student’s transcript by the instructor only during the 12-month period following assignment of the I grade or prior to the student’s graduation, whichever comes first. To remove an I grade, the instructor must complete a Change of Grade Form and file the form with the Registrar's Office. The instructor may assign whatever grade is appropriate for the entire course. This may include grades of D, F, or U . An I grade not changed by the assigning instructor within 12 months and prior to graduation shall remain an I grade thereafter.
  5. A student may re-enroll and receive credit for any course for which an I grade was previously received, but retaking the course will not result in a removal of the I grade from the student’s transcript.

The effect of removing an I grade on a student’s academic standing (scholastic warning, probation, or suspension) depends on the date the transaction is officially recorded on the student’s academic record. If the transaction is recorded before the student begins another semester, the grade replacing the I is included in the grade-point average calculation that establishes the student’s academic standing. If the transaction is recorded after the student begins another semester, the new grade’s effect on academic standing is based upon its inclusion with grades for the semester in which the student is enrolled.

Independent Studies

Independent study courses (including directed reading and special topics courses which do not carry a subtitle) are for students capable of self-direction who meet the requirements for the S/U option, i.e., if the students are not eligible for the S/U option, they are not eligible for independent study. Each college determines the maximum number of credits that may be earned in independent study courses.

Numbering of Courses

University courses numbered 100 through 299 are considered lower division and are for undergraduate credit only, these courses will not be applied toward a graduate degree at any time. Courses numbered 300 through 499 are considered upper division and are intended for the undergraduate level, but in some cases graduate credit may be obtained. Courses numbered 450 through 499 are designed for seniors and graduates; 500 through 599 are primarily for graduate students working on a master's degree; 600 through 700 are principally for students working on a doctoral degree.

In some cases, graduate credit may be obtained in courses numbered 300 through 449, to secure such credit, a written request must be filed with the dean of the Graduate School at the time of registration. However, these courses cannot be deficiencies, and no more than 4 credits will be granted toward a degree can be granted for courses numbered below 400. The total of courses numbered 300 through 449 cannot exceed 8 credits.

Prerequisite/Corequisite

A prerequisite is an enforceable entry requirement for a particular course. Students must have successfully completed the prerequisite before enrolling in the subsequent course. A corequisite is a course that is required to be taken in conjunction with another course.

Repeating Courses

A student may repeat a course in which a D or F grade has been earned. A computable grade (excluding I, W, RR, AU, CR, S, or U) in a repeated course may be substituted in the calculation of the grade-point average, though the original grade also remains on the transcript. The first occurrence with a C or better grade will count in earned/ passed hours. Future attempts will not count in earned/passed hours. If a student repeats a course eligible for grade substitution in which the student has earned a D and then fails the course, the second grade of F will not be substituted for the original grade.

Neither credits nor grade points may be earned by repeating a course for which a grade of C- or higher has already been received. Repeat option applies only to eligible courses that were completed prior to the time a student was awarded a degree at NMSU.

RR Grade

The RR  grade applies only to designated skill development undergraduate courses (CCDE, CCDL, CCDM & CCDR) approved by the University Curriculum Committee and indicates the student has made substantial progress toward completing the requirements of the course. It carries neither penalty nor credit. The student must re-enroll and successfully complete the course in order to earn credit. The grade of RR may be received only once in any given course, and it remains on the student’s transcript.

S/U Option

Students with 28 credits at NMSU under traditional grading, with an overall average of 2.5 or better, may exercise the S/U option. The following limitations apply:

  1. No more than 7 credits per semester or 4 credits per summer session.
  2. Not to exceed a total of 21 semester credits.

These limitations do not apply to honors and courses officially designated S/U.

Each course under this option must be requested during registration. Eligibility must be determined by the student’s academic dean and certified by the student. The course must be taken outside the major. If the student changes majors, the new major department may require a traditional grade for a course previously passed with an S grade. The traditional grade change is made by the instructor or by a course challenge if the original instructor is no longer with the university.

Eligibility for S/U grading must be re-established after adjusted credit has been approved.

Nondegree students who do not meet the above requirements may take courses under the S/U option. However, these courses may not be applied toward an undergraduate degree at NMSU.

Graduate students in regular standing may take courses for the S/U option, outside the major department, under regulations stated in the Graduate Catalog.

Each academic college of the university may designate courses in which the grading will be on a basis of S or U for all students enrolled in the courses. Credits in such courses are not included in the 21-credit limitation or the 7-credit-per-semester limit.

Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Courses

Undergraduates who wish to enroll in a graduate-level course numbered 450 or higher for undergraduate credit must secure prior written permission from the instructor and course dean. Enrollment is by petition only and is limited to outstanding juniors and seniors.

University Credits

The unit of university credit is the semester hour, which is the equivalent of one hour of recitation/lecture or a minimum of two hours of practice per week for one semester.

University Grading System

Grade reports are not automatically mailed to students. Students can access grades and credits by the web using my.nmsu.edu. At the request of the student, the instructor will provide information on progress in the course prior to the last day to drop a course.

The NMSU system of grading is expressed in letters, which carry grade points used in calculating the cumulative grade-point average:

Letter Grade Grade Points per Unit of Credit
A+ 4.0
A 4.0
A- 3.7
B+ 3.3
B 3.0
B- 2.7
C+ 2.3
C 2.0
C- 2.0
D+, D, D- 1.0
F 0
W — Withdrawal 0
N — Grade not submitted 0
CR — Credit authorized, but not letter grade 0
IP — In progress 0
RR — Progress in undergraduate course 0
PR — Progress on graduate thesis 0
S1 — Satisfactory work 0
U — Unsatisfactory work 0
I — Incomplete 0
AU — Audit 0
1

An S grade is a grade satisfactory to the professor and is normally equivalent to the letter grade of C- or higher.

In computing the overall grade-point average, the total credits in which grades of A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, or F have been assigned is divided into the total number of grade points earned.

A course for which only CR, but no letter grade, is given and a course in which an S or PR grade is earned will be included in earned hours but is not computed in the grade-point average.

Withdrawals

Administrative Withdrawals

When an administrative withdrawal from a course is initiated for a student who is representing the university at an official out-of-town event, the withdrawal will become effective upon the return of the student to the university from that event or five class days after the signed drop slip arrives in the dean’s office, whichever is sooner.

Military Withdrawal

The following steps must be taken by all New Mexico State University students called up for active duty who wish to withdraw from all their classes:

  1. Military and Veterans Programs: VA students ordered to Active Duty must provide a copy of orders to the MVP office, Garcia Annex, room 141. To assist in reporting accurate information to the VA Regional Office, student should also provide, in writing, last day of class attendance.
  2. NMSU Registrar: All students presenting their orders to the NMSU Registrar's Office, (575) 646-3411, will receive a military withdrawal from classes and a full tuition and fees refund for that semester.
  3. Bookstore: Students who still have their receipts for textbooks purchased the semester in which they are called to active duty will be given a full refund for these textbook purchases when they present their orders. (575) 646-4431

Student Medical Withdrawal

A medical withdrawal applies to a student who becomes seriously ill, injured or hospitalized and is therefore unable to complete an academic term for which they are enrolled. The attending physician must provide a letter on official letterhead with an original signature, stating the date(s) within the semester that the student was under medical care and that the student must withdraw because of the medical condition. This letter must be submitted within the semester or no later than one academic year after the end of that term for which the withdrawal is being requested.

Once the information is reviewed a determination will be made if the student is eligible for consideration of tuition or other refunds (Students receiving funds awarded by the University Financial Aid and Scholarship Services should be aware of policies regarding withdrawal from the University). At the Las Cruces campus, medical withdrawal begins at the Registrar’s Office. At all other campuses, medical withdrawal begins at the Student Services Office.

Withdrawal Due to Medical Conditions of a Family Member

A student who must withdraw because of a medical condition of an immediate family member will need to submit a letter from the family member’s attending physician on official letterhead with an original signature, stating the date(s) within the semester that the student’s immediate family member was under medical care, and confirm that the student must withdraw to attend to the immediate family member’s medical condition. This letter must be submitted within the semester or no later than one academic year after the end of that term for which the withdrawal is being requested.

For purposes of this policy, “immediate family member” includes spouse, a domestic partner as defined in the NMSU Policy Manuel 7.04 Domestic Partnerships, a child, parent or legal guardian, a sister or brother, a grandparent, or a grandchild. Such familial relationships created by law are also included (i.e. mother/father in law; half or step siblings); other relationships can be considered on a case–by-case basis.

Once the information is reviewed a determination will be made if the student is eligible for consideration of tuition or other refunds (Students receiving funds awarded by the University Financial Aid and Scholarship Services should be aware of policies regarding withdrawal from the University). At the Las Cruces campus, medical withdrawal begins at the Registrar’s Office. At all other campuses, medical withdrawal begins at the Student Services Office.

Withdrawal from NMSU

Withdrawal from any NMSU campus is an official procedure that must be approved as indicated on the withdrawal form. All such withdrawals will be registered on the student’s transcript. It is the student’s responsibility to initiate withdrawal from the university and to obtain necessary signatures. Students who leave without following the official procedure are graded appropriately by the instructor. On the Las Cruces campus, withdrawal begins at the Registrar’s Office. At all other campuses, withdrawal begins at the Student Services Office. Applicable dates are published on the approved university academic calendar or under important dates at: http://registration.nmsu.edu.

Students who withdraw from all courses for the semester should do so in person through the Registrar’s Office. Students who are unable to come in person may submit an e-mail using their NMSU e-mail account to registrar@nmsu.edu.

A student who withdraws from all classes for the semester will retain access to their NMSU account per current policy but will lose access to other services and privileges available to enrolled students.

Financial information concerning drops and withdrawals can be found at http://uar.nmsu.edu/withdrawals/. Financial Aid Recipients should contact University Financial Aid and Scholarship Services before withdrawing. Students receiving funds awarded by the University Financial Aid and Scholarship Services should be aware of policies regarding withdrawal from the University.

The Federal Higher Education Act requires the University to calculate a Return of Federal Student Aid Funds for students who withdraw (officially or unofficially) from all classes on or before the 60 percent attendance point in the semester. Using a pro-rata schedule, the percentage of the semester attended is used to calculate the amount of the student’s earned versus unearned Federal student aid funds. The unearned portion of Federal student aid funds will be returned to the appropriate aid program(s). Students withdrawing from classes are responsible for payment of any balance due after the required return of Federal student aid funds.

NMSU offers Associate, Baccalaureate, Master’s and Doctoral degrees. NMSU also offers Certificates at the associate and graduate levels. Requirements for specific degrees and other designations are set forth by this catalog for the NMSU-Las Cruces (main) campus and the corresponding catalogs for the NMSU Community Colleges (Alamogordo, Carlsbad, Dona Ana and Grants).

Additional Degree Designations

As part of a degree program, students may also earn additional degree designations indicating fields of study such as majors, minors or concentrations.  A major is defined as a recognized area of study in which there is an extensive and well-developed curriculum offered at the university, as well as adequate library resources and support services. A minor is based on courses that encompass a recognized field of study outside the student’s major. A concentration is based on a collection of coursework in an area that is part of a major program of study. Degrees and additional designations awarded, limited to majors, minors, and concentrations, will be noted on the student’s transcript. 

Catalog Effective Period

Each annual catalog edition is effective Summer Session I through Spring Semester and is considered active for a six year period for all campuses. Curricular requirements (course requirements and number of credits required) for a specific degree or other designation may be met by completing all of the course requirements as set forth by the catalog in effect at first matriculation, or any subsequent catalog, provided the selected catalog is considered active when the requirements for graduation are met. For all other matters, the current catalog is controlling. NMSU reserves the right to withdraw courses at any time, change fees, rules, calendar, curriculum, degree programs, degree requirements, graduation procedures and any other requirements affecting students. Except as otherwise stated here, changes will become effective whenever the proper authorities so determine and will apply to both prospective students and those already enrolled.

Application for Degree/Graduation or Certificate

Degrees and certificates are not awarded automatically upon completion of the requirements of their program of study.  In order to receive the degree or certificate, students must submit an application and fee in the semester in which the student expects to graduate or complete the certificate requirements.  The deadline for the application and fee is specified in the academic calendar for each semester. All designations earned must be noted in the application.  Additional designations may not be added to a degree after it is awarded. Students who will be completing two degrees/certificates in the same semester must apply for graduation and pay the fee for each degree separately. Students who do not meet the necessary degree or certificate requirements or otherwise elect not to graduate in the semester in which the application is filed are required to re-apply in a subsequent semester and pay another fee. Students who wish to participate in commencement must submit a separate application and pay a fee by a separate deadline established by the Registrar.  Students applying for graduate degrees must satisfy additional requirements as described in the Master’s and Doctoral Degree sections below.

Multiple Degrees and Designations

A student may earn more than one degree or multiple degree designations by completing all of the requirements in an appropriate catalog for each degree or designation. Students completing requirements for more than one degree must apply for and pay the application fee for each degree to be awarded. Upon completion of all requirements, multiple majors for a single degree (e.g., B.A., Major in Art; Major in Anthropology) and multiple bachelor’s degrees (e.g., B.A. and B.S.) will be noted on the student’s academic record/transcript and may also be granted at one commencement.

Degree Revocation

The Board of Regents reserves the right to revoke a degree should it be determined upon investigation that the degree requirements were not properly met.  A degree revocation must be in accordance with NMSU policy and related rules.

Honorary Degrees

Ceremonial Honorary Degrees may be awarded in accordance with NMSU policy and rules as set forth in the NMSU Regents Policy Manual and the related Administrative Rules and Procedures.

Community College Certificate

A Community College may offer two types of certificates, the Certificate of Achievement and/or the Certificate of Completion. Certificates may be awarded independently from any degree program.

Certificate of Achievement

The Certificate of Achievement is a program of study less than 16 credits and is not eligible for Federal financial aid. This Certificate provides employment related and/or career enhancing skills necessary to succeed in a job or a chosen field of study. These courses can be a subset of those required for a corresponding Certificate of Completion or Applied Associates Degree. These certificates are recorded on the student’s transcript.

Certificate of Completion

The Certificate of Completion requires a minimum of 16 credits (other Title IV requirements must be met to be eligible for financial aid) and has been approved through the academic review process. These courses can be a subset of those required for a corresponding Applied Associates Degree. These certificates are recorded on the student’s transcript.

Requirements for certificates are found in the respective catalogs and sections concerning these programs. The following requirements apply to all certificates.

  1. Minimum Credit Hours: The number of credit hours varies from certificate to certificate. Students must successfully complete the total number of credit hours as outlined in the respective catalogs and sections describing these certificates.
  2. GPA requirement: Students must earn a minimum grade of C- in courses required for the certificate. In addition, students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better in all courses taken at NMSU or one of its community colleges.
  3. Residency: A minimum of 6 credits earned toward the certificate must be completed at NMSU or one of its community colleges. If the certificate requires fewer than 6 credits, all credits must be completed at NMSU or one of its community colleges.

Associate’s Degree

Associate’s degrees are of two types.  The academic associate’s degree prepares students to transfer to a baccalaureate program and generally includes credits toward the first two years of a four-year degree. Academic associate’s degrees include the Associate of Arts, the Associate of Science, and other named degrees that link to a specific major (the Associate of Education, for example). Other associate degrees, typically called Associate of Applied Science, prepare students for entry into the workforce. Credits for these programs may or may not apply toward a four-year degree. Students interested in transferring to NMSU or another four-year institution should check the appropriate sections of the university catalog for more information.

Requirements for the two-year associate degrees are found in the respective catalogs and sections concerning these degrees. The following requirements apply to all associates degrees:

  1. Minimum Credit Hours: a minimum of 60 credits (excluding “N” suffix courses).  Some programs of study require coursework in excess of the 60 credit-hour minimum.
  2. GPA requirement: Students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better in all courses taken at NMSU or one of its community colleges. In addition, students must earn a C- or better in classes they take to meet the Basic Skills requirement (English 111g and one of several math course options),
  3. Residency - 15 of the last 30 credits earned toward the degree must be completed at NMSU.
  4. Major: All requirements for at least one major field of study as specified in the college and departmental sections of the respective catalog.

Associate Major

An associate major, consisting of at least 18 credits, may include courses from more than one department. Requirements for the Associate Majors are specified in the respective Community College Catalogs.

Baccalaureate Degree (Bachelor’s Degree)

A baccalaureate or bachelor’s degree provides students with a broad educational base as well as knowledge in a specific major field. Each college has unique degree requirements that are listed in the college’s designated section of this catalog. In addition to the College and Department requirements, students must complete each of the following degree requirements for every Bachelor’s Degree awarded by NMSU:

  1. Minimum Credit Hours: a minimum of 120 credits (excluding “N” suffix courses) 
  2. GPA requirement- a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 in all courses taken at NMSU
  3. New Mexico Common Core- 35-36 credits of state mandated general education courses (as specified in General Education section); such course are designed with a “G”
  4. New Mexico State University’s Viewing a Wider World- 6 credits of Viewing a Wider World courses; such courses are designated with a “V”, or alternatives as specified in the Viewing a Wider World section
  5. Upper Division Courses- a minimum of 48 credits in courses numbered 300 or above.
  6. Residency – Of the last 36 credits earned toward award of the degree:
    1. 30 credits must be completed at NMSU
    2. 21 credits must be upper division (300 or above) and
    3. 12 of the 21 upper division credits must be within the student’s major.
      NOTE: colleges or departments may require that more than 12 upper division credits be within the major and they may direct that a certain number of these credits be course specific.
  7. Major – all requirements for at least one undergraduate major field of study, other than a supplemental major, as specified in the college and departmental sections of the catalog.

Bachelor’s Degree Designations

Undergraduate Major

An undergraduate major consists of 24 or more credits within the major field, of which 18 credits must be upper-division courses, and may include courses from more than one department.  Additional requirements for majors are specified in the college and department’s designated sections of this catalog.

Supplemental Major

A supplemental major consists of 24 or more credits of interdisciplinary coursework, of which at least 18 credits must be upper-division (300-499), and no more than 9 credits may be from the student’s major course of study. Additional requirements for supplemental majors are specified in the catalog listing for the field of study.

Undergraduate Minor

An undergraduate minor consist of 18 credits of course work, of which 9 credits must be upper-division (300-499). A minor encompasses courses that in a recognized field of study outside the student’s major. At least 12 credits of a minor must be completed at NMSU.  Additional requirements for minors are specified in the college and department’s designated sections of this catalog.

Undergraduate Concentration

A concentration consists of 12 or more credits of coursework in a specialty area that is related to a specific major field of study. At least 9 of the 12 credits must be upper-division (300-499), and at least 9 credits must be completed at NMSU.  Additional requirements for concentrations are specified in the college and department’s designated sections of this catalog.

Distance Education Bachelor’s Degree Completion Program

A Bachelor Degree Completion Program allows students who have met the lower division requirements (100 and 200 level) of an undergraduate degree program to complete the remaining upper-division credits (300 and 400 level) through distance delivery courses offered by NMSU Las Cruces. Only selected degrees are available as degree completion programs.  Students must complete all required lower-division (100 and 200 level) credits before they can be admitted to the Bachelor’s Degree Completion Programs. The program(s) normally require two years of upper division (300 and 400 level) coursework.

Graduating with Honors

For information about graduating with Honors, please refer to the Recognition of Academic Achievement section of this catalog.

Graduate Degrees

All graduate degrees are subject to rules and regulations of the Graduate School.  Degrees will be certified by the Graduate School only upon the complete review and clearance of the candidate’s program of study.

Graduate Degree Designations

Graduate Major

A graduate major may include courses from more than one department, but as a minimum it must consist of at least 30 graduate credits. Additional requirements may be imposed by the State of New Mexico and New Mexico State University as specified in this Catalog.

Graduate Minor

A graduate minor is based on at least 9 graduate credits in courses that encompass a recognized field of study outside the student’s major. Departments may require certain courses be a part of a minor and may exclude other courses.

Graduate Concentrations

A concentration is a collection of coursework in a specific area that is part of a degree program of study at NMSU. At the graduate level at least 9 of these 12 credits must be numbered 500 or above. Only approved concentrations within a students’ department or program may be noted on a transcript.

Concentrations will not be added to a transcript after a degree is awarded. In order for the approved concentration to be noted on the student’s transcript, the following conditions must be met:

  1. Request the concentration at the time they file their official program of study.
  2. Identify the concentration on their official Application for Degree.

Graduate Certificates

A Graduate Certificate program requires 12-18 credits of course work that is interrelated and designed to develop a focused skill or area of expertise but does not culminate in the awarding of a degree. Courses that comprise a graduate certificate must be regular approved courses offered by the University and must be numbered 450 or above. A graduate certificate is indicated on the student’s transcript.

Master's Degree

New Mexico State University offers both academic and professional master’s degrees. A link to the list of all master’s degrees is provided in the Graduate School section of this catalog.

Underprepared students may be required to take additional general or discipline-specific undergraduate or graduate courses to prepare them for the advanced academic work necessary for success in graduate level courses in their chosen field.. This may result in an extended graduation date.

Admissions to the Master’s Degree

The admission of a student into the Graduate School does not imply admission to candidacy for an advanced degree. The major department in which the student intends to become a candidate for a master’s degree must determine the student’s ability to pursue studies at the graduate level. Please see the Department(s) for specific requirements.

Program of Study

During the first semester of enrollment each new graduate student should prepare a complete program of study in consultation with the student’s advisor.

Application to Candidacy

The program of study will formally list the curriculum requirements for degree completion and is required for application to candidacy. The program of study must be approved by the advisor, department, and academic dean and submitted to the Graduate School. The Program of study may specify the Catalog at the time of graduation, as long as the catalog is considered active. Otherwise, the current Catalog will be listed.

An Application for Admission to Candidacy must be filed with the Graduate School. This must be done before the completion of 12 credits of graduate coursework. The student must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 at the time the application is submitted. The application may specify the Catalog at the time of graduation, as long as the catalog is considered active. Otherwise, the current Catalog will be listed.

The student’s program of study must:

  1. Meet the requirements of the chosen catalog, including the regulations of the Graduate School and of the major department.
  2. Be signed by the student, the student’s advisor, department head, minor faculty if applicable, and academic dean .
  3. List each course prefix/number, short title, credit hours and grades if available.

If the program of study does not comply with the departmental requirements or the potential degree audit, the program of study must be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. . The Program of Study is not required for master’s programs if defined within the Star Degree Audit.

Credit Hour Requirement

A minimum of 30 credits is required for the master’s degree. Most master’s degrees require at least 15 credits in courses numbered 500 or above. This includes thesis credits for any master’s programs that include a thesis option. Master’s programs involving a thesis, must include, either a minimum of 4 credits or a maximum of 6 credits of thesis. Please see the “Thesis” section for more information.

At least 15 credits for the master’s degree must be for work in courses within the student’s department. Additional credits may be selected from other fields to fit into a logical and justifiable program. However, courses that are used to remove deficiencies or satisfy prerequisites cannot be counted as requirements for a master’s degree.

Coursework Requirement

Students must take coursework from a variety of faculty. Students may not take more than half of the minimum credits required for a master’s degree with the same professor, excluding thesis credits. Short courses, of less than one summer session or one semester cannot constitute more than one-fourth of the total requirements for the degree.

Thesis Option

A thesis in the major field is recommended and may be required at the discretion of the department. A minimum of 4 credits and a maximum of 6 credits may be counted toward the requirements for a master’s degree. The final examination shall consist of an oral defense of the student’s thesis as well as a general examination of the candidate’s field of study.

  • Continuous Enrollment- once registered, a student must continue to register for a minimum of 1 credit in thesis or graduate coursework each regular semester until the thesis is approved by the Graduate School and the copies have been accepted by the Branson Library binding section. .

Graduate Committee for Thesis Option

The graduate committee for the master’s degree consists of a minimum of three faculty members who hold, at least, a master’s degree and meet the following criteria:

  1. Committee chair:
    1. Must be from the student’s home department
    2. Must be a graduate faculty member
  2. Committee member(s):
    1. May be from outside the student’s home department
    2. Student’s with a declared minor- may have the representative from a related area or be appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School.
    3. Must be a graduate faculty member
  3. Dean’s Representative:
    1. Must be a representative from a related area or appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School
    2. Must be a graduate faculty member

Finalizing the Master’s Thesis

After successful completion of the final examination, a copy of the thesis must be submitted to the Graduate School for format review no later than the deadline posted to the Graduate School website. The form and style of the thesis must comply with the regulations given in the Guidelines for Preparing a Thesis or Dissertation http://gradschool.nmsu.edu/theses-dissertations/. These guidelines also contain detailed information on the thesis approval process and binding. The thesis is not complete until copies have been accepted for binding by the binding section staff and until the online Library binding form has been completed and received in Branson Library

Professional Degree and Non-Thesis Final Examination

Each candidate will be given a final examination conducted by their graduate committee in accordance to the schedule provided by the Graduate School. It is the department’s responsibility to ensure that the Report of Results for the Master’s Professional or Non-Thesis Final Exam form is submitted to the Graduate School at least ten working days after the exam.

The final examination format for the professional degrees and non-thesis option will be determined by the department, with the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. If a department does not specify an examination format, the final examination will consist of an oral defense of the candidate’s field of study.

At the time of the final examination, a graduate student must have a cumulative GPA of at least a 3.0 and must be enrolled for a minimum of one credit hour in the final semester; or if the student is writing a thesis, he or she must have completed all course work for the master’s degree.

NOTE: the cumulative GPA, will be calculated from NMSU graduate coursework only.

Any candidate who fails in the final examination may either:

  1. Be granted a second examination, written or oral, after a lapse of at least one semester, only with a recommendation from the student’s advisor and approval from the Dean of the Graduate School.
  2. Be excluded from further candidacy for the degree.
  3. Failure in the second examination disqualifies a candidate from obtaining the degree.

Students in professional or non-thesis options may be required to pay a special exam fee in lieu of registering for 1 credit of graduate coursework. Please see the Tuition, Fees and Other Expenses section for more information. 

Time Limit

Students must complete the master’s degree program within seven years (or eight successive summers) of the start of the degree, including completion of the master’s thesis or final project. Any coursework more than seven years old at the time of the final examination will not be included in the program. Any exception to the time limit rule must have prior approval of the Dean of the Graduate School.

Master’s Accelerated Program (MAP)

The master’s accelerated program provides an opportunity for academically qualified undergraduate students to begin working on a master’s degree during their junior and senior years while completing a bachelor’s degree. Typically, a bachelor’s degree requires four years to complete and a master’s degree requires an additional two years. The master’s accelerated programs allow students the opportunity to complete a graduate program in an accelerated manner.

Undergraduate students may apply for acceptance to a Master’s Accelerated Program available at New Mexico State University after completing 60 semester hours of undergraduate coursework of which a minimum of 25 semester credit hours must be completed at New Mexico State University and apply towards the undergraduate major. The grade point average must be at a minimum of 3.0; departments participating in the master’s accelerated program may have requirements that exceed these minimum standards. It is the student’s responsibility to meet with their financial aid advisor as financial aid awards may be adjusted by the Financial Aid Office.

The graduate department within the colleges may allow well-prepared advanced students to substitute a maximum of  12 graduate course credits for elective courses in an undergraduate degree program and then subsequently count those same courses as fulfilling graduate requirements in a related graduate program that the institution offers. A graduate program has the discretion to use up to 12 credits of NMSU coursework (450 level or higher) that can logically be applied towards the completion of master’s program of study. Students must receive a grade of B or higher in this coursework to be counted for graduate credit.

To Participate in this program:

  1. The student must prior approval by the graduate program
  2. Be general or discipline electives in the student’s undergraduate course of study. No required courses from the undergraduate program will be accepted for transfer credit into the graduate program.
  3. Enroll in appropriate graduate level courses. It is the student’s responsibility to register for graduate-level courses and ensure that those courses are applicable to the desired graduate degree program. If the course(s) requires instructor approval, it is the responsibility of the students to get approval in order to register for the course(s).
  4. Submit a completed Master’s Accelerated Program Referral Form to the Graduate School by the first Friday of classes, with the following signatures
  5. The Undergraduate Advisor
  6. The anticipated Master’s Department Head
  7. The Undergraduate Academic Dean
  8. The Financial Aid Advisor
  9. Be accepted by the Graduate School for conditional admittance.
  10. Participate in the Developing New Scholars Program (DNSP) through the Graduate School. The DNSP program provides formal mentoring to students that supports their success in graduate education.
  11. Upon graduation with the Bachelor’s degree and final admission into the master’s/graduate program, the approved credits (up to 12) will be recorded on both the undergraduate and the graduate transcript. 

Interdisciplinary Master's Degree

Interdisciplinary studies, at New Mexico State University, are intended for individuals specializing in programs that require the integration of more than one discipline to fully engage in the field of study. The programs provide a mechanism to address emerging scholarship, innovation and research, as well as, allow graduate students to engage in emerging technologies that optimize their education outside the traditional disciplinary boundaries. An Interdisciplinary study takes advantage of traditional academic training within specific departments and also allows students to customize their own career preparation. In these programs, a coherent common core is expected and is intended to combine existing courses across disciplines to meet unique objectives.

The interdisciplinary studies option should not be used in cases where the applicants’ objectives can be realized by admission to a specific department with a degree program, and inclusion of up to two minor areas in the program of study.

Admission

Students interested in pursuing an Interdisciplinary Master’s Degree (IMAS) degree must meet with the Graduate School for advisement. The advisement session will include information on completing the IMAS admission application: 

  1. Develop a proposal for interdisciplinary studies
  2. Create the IMAS graduate committee
  3. Once the student’s graduate committee is designated, the committee can require additional materials such as a statement of interest, letters of recommendation, GRE or GMAT scores and a personal interview.
  4. Complete the IMAS referral form and procure committee members IMAS program approval.
  5. Procure academic department head IMAS referral form approval.
  6. Submit IMAS referral form and proposal for interdisciplinary studies to Graduate School for admissions.

Degree(s) Awarded

Students receive a Master of Arts (MA) or a Master of Science (MS) and a concentration in the designated interdisciplinary study area.

Other conditions for being awarded a degree within the interdisciplinary studies program are:

  1. The student must present a written description of the program concept consisting of the following, as well as, the designated degree being sought and a name of the interdisciplinary area:
    1. The objective of the program of study which should include, proposed areas of skill development and proposed courses in more than one graduate degree granting department at NMSU.
    2. A justification for not using an existing degree program.
  2. The student’s program of study must include a minimum of 30 graduate level credits and a maximum of 36 graduate level credits. Students may take six credits in departments that do not grant a graduate degree, but the courses must be numbered 450 or above and be pertinent to the program of study.
  3. The majority of the departments involved in the student’s program will be master’s degree granting departments. The student is expected to take at least 15 credits in the primary area of study within one department. The department selected by the student will receive a copy of the student’s application for admissions to the Graduate School. In addition, the student is required to select a minor area of study in another department that consists of at least 9 graduate credit hours.
  4. The student will form a committee composed of members of the graduate faculty and select an advisor who will chair the committee. The chair must be from the primary department where the student has taken at least 15 credit hours listed in the proposal submitted. The other committee member must be from the department in which the student has selected a minor area of study from the approved list.
  5. The student will be required to submit the Candidacy Form after they have satisfactorily completed 12 credits.
  6. The program will meet all requirements of a master’s degree, with the interpretation, that “major field” includes courses from two or more departments and in the designated interdisciplinary study area.
  7. The program of study will include the completion of a research thesis or project. The work may be submitted in the form of a publishable manuscript, technical report, thesis or creative option.
  8. The student may enroll on a part-time basis keeping in mind that coursework cannot be more than seven years old at the time of the final examination.
  9. The student will be administered a final comprehensive exam that is consistent with the department selected for the primary area of study. For example, if a department requires a written exam, the student in the interdisciplinary masters will also be required to take a written exam.
  10. The final oral comprehensive exam will consist of questions pertinent to the area of study and the defense of the research thesis or project. In both cases, an integrated approach to the areas of study chosen should be followed.
  11. All other rules for graduate study at NMSU must be followed.

Thesis/Non-thesis Option

As with any graduate student, the student in interdisciplinary studies can select to follow a thesis or non-thesis option. Students enrolled in the thesis option register for six thesis credits. Students not wishing to follow the thesis option will be required to complete a project report. The project must reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the program which the student is pursuing.

Comprehensive Exam

Students in interdisciplinary studies take a comprehensive exam composed of questions designed by the student’s committee. The committee consists of two individuals in the area of study, the dean’s representative who must be outside of the department/program/interdisciplinary study option, and a committee chair.

Second Master's Degree

A student who has earned one master’s degree at NMSU may be allowed to count a maximum of six semester credits earned on the first degree toward a second master’s degree, if those credits fit into a logical graduate program. The number of shared credits may be increased for joint degree programs.

Teacher Licensure

Students wishing to take graduate courses for licensure, renewal of licensure or for personal enrichment must be fully admitted to a department in order to do so. Undeclared students may not register for teacher licensure classes.

Endorsement is available at both the elementary and secondary levels in bilingual education, TESOL (Teaching of English as a Second Language), reading and special education. Endorsement is also available in early childhood education at the elementary level. Contact curric-instr@nmsu.edu for more information.

Specialist in Education

The specialist in education degree is available for experienced members of the education profession who have completed the master’s degree and have maintained a 3.3 grade-point average while pursuing this degree or its equivalent. Programs are available in curriculum and instruction, as well as, school psychology. Emphasis is placed on the development of the competencies needed for a professional specialization in a given field. Students must complete the general application for the Graduate School and they should also check with the admitting department for specific departmental requirements.

Residency and Credit Requirements

The specialist in education degree requires a minimum of 30 credits beyond the master’s degree, including research, intern experiences and graduate courses. Twenty-four of these credits must be completed at NMSU to meet the campus residency requirements.

Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA, no more than 6 credits of C level work are allowed for this program.

Program of Study

It is recommended that during the first semester of enrollment each beginning graduate student should prepare a complete program of study with the student’s advisor. The program of study can be tentative, should be kept in the student’s file within the department, and is not considered an “Application for Admission to Candidacy.”

Major Field

All course work taken for the degree should apply directly, through a logical program of study, to the specialty which candidate has selected. Each department is responsible for defining the required sequence of courses.

Candidacy

Following the successful completion of 12 credits beyond the master’s degree, the student is eligible for admission to candidacy. With the achievement of candidacy, a committee is appointed to work with the candidate on the remainder of the program. The committee consists of three members of the graduate faculty in the College of Education.

Internship

Each candidate will earn from three to six semester credits in an internship. This experience will consist of supervised performance of duties related to the candidate’s specialty. The student’s department will determine the structure of the internship and a research project will be conducted in conjunction with the internship.

Oral Examination

The oral examination committee will consist of the student’s committee and a dean’s representative appointed from the graduate faculty by the dean of the Graduate School. This committee will conduct an oral examination at the conclusion of the research project and no earlier than the candidate’s last semester of enrollment.

The examination will consist of a defense of the project along with general questions on subject matter related to the candidate’s field of study. Any candidate who fails the oral examination may upon recommendation of the advisor and with the approval of the graduate dean, be granted a second examination after a lapse of at least one semester. Failure in the second examination disqualifies the candidate from obtaining the degree.

Time Limit

The specialist in education degree must be completed within seven years following admission to the program. Students cannot include any course work on their program of study that is more than seven years old at the time of the final oral examination.

Doctoral Degrees

The doctoral degree requires significant scholarly study beyond the master’s program.

Prospective candidates are expected to hold bachelors or master’s degrees from accredited institutions, based on curricula that include the prerequisites for graduate study in the department of their subject. To be considered for admission to a doctoral program, the applicant must have a grade-point average of at least 3.0. Prospective candidates are urged to consult the department in which they wish to study for information concerning specific requirements.

Professional Doctoral Degrees

Doctor of Economic Development (DED)

Students enrolled in the Doctor of Economic Development are required to complete and pass a comprehensive examination. Since a dissertation is not required, students are expected to complete an internship experience and a project paper as defined by their program. They can embark on the project paper once they have completed and passed their comprehensive examination. Students are not required to take 700 level dissertation hours. However, they are expected to complete at least 12 credits at the 600 level including ECDV 694 (Internship) and ECDV 699 (Doctoral Project).

A project paper must be finalized using a similar submission process as the dissertation (see the “Finalizing the Doctoral Dissertation”). On the front page, after the title of the paper, the student should indicate that it is a project paper. Students completing projects papers do not need to complete the earned doctoral survey. The paper must be submitted to the Graduate School for format review on or before the deadline. The form and style of the paper must comply with regulations given in the “Guidelines for Preparing a Thesis or Dissertation.” These guidelines also contain detailed information on the dissertation/project paper- approval process as well as information on binding. Candidates are encourages to consult with the Graduate School on format, deadlines and procedures before final typing. The project paper is not complete until copies have been accepted for binding by the staff of Branson Library and until the microfilm agreement form has been completed and received in Branson Library.

Doctor of Education (Ed.D)

The degree of Doctor of Education demonstrates proficiency in a program of graduate study in which the emphasis is in preparation for performance in professional education. This program is intended primarily for students pursuing careers in which teaching, administration or school services are predominate rather than those in research. The Ed.D. Degree in curriculum and instruction is offered in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction; the degree in educational administration is offered in the Department of Educational Leadership and Administration.

The requirements for doctoral degrees in the two departments of the College of Education have the following distinguishing elements:

  1. The qualifying examination consists of a written and an oral section, both of which are administered prior to admission to the program. Acceptance for doctoral admission is equivalent to the successful completion of the qualifying examination. Residency of at least two consecutive semesters cannot commence until the semester after the qualifying examination is successfully completed.
  2. Comprehensive examinations usually are administered three times annually. The written examination tests the major and related areas of concentration and is administered after successful completion of the orals within two weeks’ time. A student who fails any part of the comprehensive examination may present him or herself for re-examination of the failed part of the exam before moving on to the next part. 
  3. The major area of study must be within the College of Education

A minimum of nine credits constitutes the related area. The courses can be taken in any department of the university with the approval of the student’s committee. The related area must be specifically planned with the major and minor departments in order for the doctoral fields to be mutually supportive. Any transfer credit or predoctoral course work to be included in the related field must have the approval of both the major and minor department at the outset. Specified course work in both research and statistics is required for this degree. Other requirements are described in the departmental sections of this catalog.

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)

Students holding a Bachelor’s degree in Nursing are required to complete and pass all required course work for the DNP program, as well as, complete and pass their comprehensive examination. Since a dissertation is not required, they are expected to complete an internship experience and a project paper as defined by their program. They can embark on the project paper once they have completed and passed their comprehensive examination. They are not required to take 700 level dissertation hours. However, they are expected to complete at least 12 credits at the 600 level including NURS 698 (Advanced Clinical immersion) credits sufficient to complete the DNP Final Project.

Students who hold a Master’s of Science in Nursing are required to complete the following:

  1. All course work requirements
  2. Their comprehensive exam (with passing marks)
  3. The DNP Project.

Post- MSN DNP students must complete at least 6 credits at the 600 level, including NURS 698 credits sufficient to finish the DNP Project. Finalized projects must be uploaded to a national DNP Project repository approved by the Graduate Faculty of the School of Nursing in order to achieve the DNP degree.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Doctor of Philosophy degree requires distinguished attainment in both scholarship and original research. The doctoral degree requires significant scholarly study beyond the master’s that is tailored to the needs and interests of the student.  The degree is granted in recognition of the candidate’s high attainments and ability in the special field, shown by work on the required examinations covering both the general and the special fields. The individualized program of study is designed to meet the campus residency requirement, includes a minimum of 30 graduate credits, and includes the preparation of a dissertation. A candidate for the Ph.D. degree is expected to maintain a higher level of work than the grade-point average of 3.0, plus at least 18 credits of dissertation work (700-level courses).

Interdisciplinary Doctorate

Students interested in pursuing an Interdisciplinary Doctorate (IDOC) degree program must meet with the Graduate School for advisement. The advisement session will include information on completing the IDOC admission application.

The following requirements for admission to the interdisciplinary doctorate degree program are:

  1. Students wishing to study in the interdisciplinary doctoral degree program must apply and be accepted into a doctorate-granting department.
  2. A master’s degree or equivalent program of study that includes at least 30 credits of graduate course work with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.
  3. Twelve credits of graduate course work must be completed at NMSU in order to apply for admission into the interdisciplinary doctorate degree program. Additional course work is required for degree completion.
  4. Evidence of outstanding academic achievement in graduate school.
  5. A written description of the program concept prepared by the student consisting of:
    1. Areas in which competency is required
    2. Purposed readings and course work and how these relate to required competencies
    3. Objectives and an outline for thesis research
    4. Justification for not using an existing departmental degree program
  6. Student must select an advisor from his/her department to help structure and chair a committee consisting of at least five faculty members from the graduate faculty list who are willing to work on the interdisciplinary degree program. The committee must include at least two members from each of the two doctorate-granting departments. The committee chair will convene a meeting to review and approve the proposed program.
  7. The Graduate School will send an Admission Referral document, signed by all the committee members, to the heads of all the departments from which the student proposes to use more than 8 credits of course work, or from the department which the faculty are requested to serve on the proposed committee.
  8. Once the Admission Referral document has been approved by all departments, the committee chair will convene a meeting of the committee to review the student’s program and make changes as necessary. In addition, the committee will set the format and date for the qualifying exam. An effort should be made to incorporate the interdisciplinary nature of the program into the qualifying exam.
  9. Students have satisfied the requirements for admission to the program once the qualifying exam has been passed and the respective department heads approve the Admission Referral memorandum. Formal acceptance into a doctoral program may be required in order to receive financial assistance.
  10. The number of courses required for degree completion will vary depending on the student’s program of study, please see the department for more specific requirements. However, Interdisciplinary doctorate degree students must meet the requirements for residency, registration, the comprehensive examination, the Final Examination, the dissertation and the declaration of approved minor.
  11. The dissertation work shall include at least 18 credits of a 700-level course.

Completing your Doctoral Degree Program

Any student who fails to abide by the regulations in this section will be considered withdrawn from the university. In order to resume their studies, the student must formally apply for readmission to the Graduate School and satisfy any requirements that are in effect at the time of reapplication.

Declaration of Approved Minor

Any doctoral applicant for candidacy may declare up to two approved minors in addition to the major area of study. Demonstration of competency in the minor area will be required at both comprehensive and final examinations.

Qualifying Examination

Doctoral students must pass a qualifying examination that is scheduled by the student’s advisor and is administered by the major department. Its purpose is to determine the areas in which the student shows strength or weakness, as well as the ability to assimilate subject matter presented at the graduate level. A student may not register for dissertation credits prior to the successful completion of the qualifying examination.

The following conditions apply to students who wish to take the qualifying examination:

  1. For students who enter the Graduate School with little or no previous graduate experience but wish to proceed directly to the doctorate, the qualifying examination should be taken after 12 credits of graduate work
  2. For students who enter with a master’s degree or equivalent from another university, or another department, the qualifying examination should be taken before the completion of one semester of graduate work.
  3. For students who earn their master’s degree at New Mexico State University and will continue in the same department, the department may allow the master’s final examination to serve as the doctoral qualifying examination or may require a separate examination.

Based on the result of the qualifying examination, the department will take one or more of the following actions:

  1. Admit the student to further work toward the doctorate
  2. Recommend that the program be limited to the master’s degree
  3. Recommend a re-evaluation of the student’s progress after the lapse of one semester
  4. Recommend a discontinuation of graduate work

In all cases, the Graduate School shall be notified by the department of the results of the qualifying examination.

Students will be admitted to the doctoral program once the qualifying examination is passed. The student’s advisor and department head will then appoint the doctoral committee to prepare the student’s preliminary doctorate program of study.  The student must submit the program of study to the Graduate School immediately following admission into the doctoral program and before registering for additional coursework.

Doctoral Graduate Committee

The doctoral committee will be composed of at least four members of the graduate faculty who hold doctoral degrees. The following rules apply to the composition of the committee:

  • The committee chair must be from a discipline within the student’s major area.
  • At least one additional member of the committee must also be from a discipline within the student’s major area.
  • If an approved minor is declared, at least one (but no more than two) members of the committee must be from the minor area.
  • At least three committee members must be members of the graduate faculty and be from a doctorate-granting department
  • Only one member may be outside of the student’s department.
  • One member of the committee must serve as the dean’s representative. In programs where more than one department participates, the dean’s representative may not be from any of those departments. The dean’s representative may be one of the following
    • the member from the related area
    • a member from the minor area
    • An independent member, not from the student’s department, that is appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School.

Departments may structure committees that include more than the minimum number of members, as long as the following conditions are satisfied. No changes can be made to the doctoral committee membership without prior approval from the Dean of the Graduate School.

Additional voting and nonvoting members may be any person approved or appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School

All members of the committee will attend the comprehensive oral and final defense for the student’s dissertation.

Program of Study

Students should file the Program of Study Form once they have:

  • Completed 12 graduate credits while at NMSU that are beyond the master’s degree
  • Successfully completed the qualifying examination

The Program of Study Form should be completed and submitted to the Graduate School before registering for any additional courses. The individualized program of study is designed to meet the campus residency requirement and includes a minimum of 30 graduate credits beyond the master’s.

If the Doctoral degree requires a dissertation, at least 18 credits of dissertation work must be included. The professional doctoral degree includes a practicum or special project that culminates in a written report which demonstrates a command of the relevant scholarly literature and links it to the specific clinical or practical experience.

Comprehensive Examination

The Graduate School should receive the Program of Study and the Committee for Doctoral Students Form and the Doctoral Qualifying Examination Form.

Students will be admitted to the comprehensive examination only after the following conditions are met

  1. Completion of adequate course work, to the satisfaction of the major department and the Graduate School
  2. The graduate committee determines the student is adequately prepared for the examination
  3. Successful completion of all language requirements (where applicable)

Students must be registered for 3 credits of graduate course work during the semester in which they take the comprehensive examination. A student taking an oral examination during the summer must enroll for at least one credit for that term.

The Doctorate of Philosophy Examination or Professional Doctorate Examination Form must be on file at the Graduate School at least ten working days prior to the proposed date for the examination. The examination must be part written and part oral. The results of the oral examination will be reported to the Graduate School by the Dean’s Representative of the committee.

Any student who fails the comprehensive examination may either be terminated from the doctoral program or upon recommendation of the committee and approval of the Dean of the Graduate School, be granted a second examination after a lapse of at least one semester.

NOTE: In general, there should be a time lapse of at least one year between the comprehensive and final oral examination. However, due to the type of research required and the method of administering the written comprehensive in some departments, such a time lapse is not always practical. In all cases there must be one semester between the comprehensive and the final oral examinations.

Time Limit for the Comprehensive Examination

If more than five years have passed since the date of the comprehensive examination, the candidate will be required to take another comprehensive examination before admission to the final examination.

Advancement to Candidacy

Advancement to Candidacy recognizes that the student has demonstrated the ability to sustain a level of scholarly competency commensurate with successful completion of degree requirements. Upon advancement to candidacy, the student is cleared for the final stages of the graduate program which may include a dissertation, project or written examination.

For advancement to candidacy the following criteria must be met

  1. Successful completion of the comprehensive examination
  2. Recommendation of the graduate committee
  3. Approval of the Dean of the Graduate School

Upon receiving advancement to candidacy, students must establish residency and follow the Dissertation Registration Requirements (see Residency Requirements below).

Residency Requirements

The minimum campus residency requirements for the doctoral degree include enrollment in a minimum of 9 credit hours of program course work, including a minimum of 3 credit hours of dissertation, in at least two semesters of classes taught at NMSU. In some cases the minimum credit hour enrollment for the two semesters required to establish residency may vary based on the instructional delivery of the program, and must have prior approval from the Dean of the Graduate School.

Dissertation Registration during Fall/Spring Sessions

After becoming a candidate, students must continue to register for at least 3 credits of dissertation or graduate course work, each spring/ fall semester until the dissertation is approved by the Graduate School and the dissertation format review has been completed.  The total number of dissertation hours must be 18 credits. The doctoral committee can impose additional requirements for courses numbered 700.

A student who fails to abide by these regulations will be considered withdrawn from the university and in order to resume studies, must formally apply for readmission and satisfy the requirements in effect at the time of reapplication.

Dissertation Registration during Summer Sessions

If the final examination is to be held during the summer or the dissertation is to be completed during the summer, students must register for one credit during the summer session in which the final examination will be held or the dissertation will be completed.

Dissertation Leave of Absence

Students may seek a leave of absence from their dissertation. A leave of absence requires that a student must get prior approval from the Dean of the Graduate School, which means the student must receive permission for the leave of absence before discontinuing their formal studies.

Final Examination

NOTE:  If more than five years have elapsed since the date of the student’s passed comprehensive examination, the candidate will be required to take another comprehensive examination before admission to the final examination.

Every student working toward the doctoral degree will submit a dissertation embodying the results of original research. The dissertation is expected to demonstrate the student’s ability in independent investigation and to be a contribution to human knowledge. The dissertation shall display a mastery of the literature of the subject field, present an organized and coherent development of ideas with a clear exposition of results, and provide a critique of the limits and validity of the student’s conclusions.

When a complete draft of the dissertation has been prepared, the student’s doctoral committee (appointed after the qualifying examination) will conduct the final examination. The final examination is concerned primarily with the research work of the student as embodied in the dissertation, but it may be much broader and extend over the candidate’s entire field of study. The intention of the final examination is to verify that the candidate has a satisfactory grasp of the major subject as a whole and has a general acquaintance with the fields of knowledge represented by the course of study. The final examination is oral and is open to the public.

The final examination must be completed in accordance with the schedule provided in the academic calendar. Ten working days before the examination is taken the department must submit the form requesting this examination to the Graduate School. This form may be found on the Web at http://gradschool.nmsu.edu/graduate-forms/ and is also available from the Graduate School and departmental offices.

Students must ensure that each member of the examining committee receives a copy of the dissertation, no later than seven working days before the date of the final examination.

Any candidate who fails the final oral examination may either be terminated from the doctoral program or upon recommendation of the committee and approval of the Dean of the Graduate School, be granted a second examination after a lapse of at least one semester. Failure in the second examination disqualifies the candidate from obtaining the degree.

Finalizing the Doctoral Dissertation

After successful completion of the final examination, a copy of the dissertation must be submitted to the Graduate School for format review no later than the deadline posted to the Graduate School website.

The form and style of the dissertation must comply with the regulations given in the Guidelines for Preparing a Thesis or Dissertation http://gradschool.nmsu.edu/theses-dissertations/. These guidelines also contain detailed information on the dissertation-approval process and binding. Candidates are encouraged to consult with the Graduate School on format, deadlines and procedures before final typing.

The dissertation is not complete until copies have been accepted for binding by the binding section staff and until the UMI agreement form and the online Library binding form has been completed and received in Branson Library.

Registration at NMSU is a process that includes:  (1) Academic advising with a faculty or staff member, (2) Registering for classes, online or with your academic advisor, and (3) Paying the tuition and fee bill.  For first time freshman and transfer undergraduate students (at the Las Cruces campus), the registration process is through the Aggie Welcome/Transfer Student Orientations. For currently enrolled Undergraduate students and all Graduate students registration is through your advisor or online through the myNMSU portal.  Detailed instructions for registration are provided in the online registration guide maintained by the University Registrar’s office.  For questions about registration which are not addressed on the website, please contact the University Registrar’s Office.

Admission Requirement

No person will be will be allowed to register for courses until formally admitted to NMSU through the Community College, International Programs, Undergraduate or Graduate Admissions processes.

Course Schedule

Each semester and summer session, the Registrar’s office provides an online course schedule which can be accessed through myNMSU or the NMSU website.  Note that not all courses listed in this catalog are offered every semester.

Registration Schedule by Classification

Several groups of students (e.g. Crimson Scholars, Students with Disabilities, Veterans) receive priority dates for course registration.  For other students, registration dates are determined by the student’s current classification at the time of registration.  A student’s classification is determined by the number of credits completed. Freshmen have less than 28 completed credits.  Sophomore rank is achieved with successful completion of 28 credits; junior rank 60 credits; senior rank 90 credits.

University Credits

The unit of university credit is the semester hour, which is based upon one hour of lecture class or a minimum of two hours of practice/lab per week for one semester and assumes substantial additional out of class work by the student.  The number of credits associated with each course is indicated in the course schedule.

Course Load for Undergraduate Students

The full-time course load in a regular semester (fall or spring) for a main campus undergraduate students is 12-18 credits. A full-time course load for a summer term is 6 credits per session for a total of 12 credit hours. Some scholarships have a 15 credit course load eligibility requirement.  Each student is responsible for meeting their own scholarship eligibility requirements.  

An overload is classified as more than 18 credits for a regular semester and more than 12 credits for the summer term. A one-credit course in physical education will not create an overload. Registration for a course overload requires written permission from the Associate Dean for Academics in the student’s college. A “Petition for Course Overload” form is available from the Registrar’s office or website.  Freshmen and students with a grade of D or F, or a cumulative grade-point average of less than 2.5, in either of the last two semesters, are not eligible for overloads. Concurrent enrollment in non-NMSU courses at other post-secondary institutions requires prior approval from the Associate Dean for Academics in the student’s college, and these courses are counted as part of a student’s class load. 

Course Load for Graduate Students

A full-time course load is 9 credits, with a maximum of 15 graded credits for a regular semester (fall or spring) and a maximum of 9 graded credits for the summer session.

Course Numbering

The course numbering system at NMSU indicates the level of the course as follows:

Undergraduate courses are assigned numbers 100-499.  Courses numbered 100-299 are referred to as “lower-division courses” and are primarily for Freshman and Sophomore level students. Courses numbered 300-499 are referred to as “upper-division courses” and are primarily for Junior and Senior level students. 

Graduate courses are assigned numbers 500 or greater.  Courses numbered 500-599 are primarily for graduate students working on a master’s degree. Courses numbered 600-700 are primarily for students working on a doctoral degree.

Some graduate programs may accept courses numbered 450-499 for graduate credit.  Graduate students should confirm eligibility with their program department head.

Prerequisites and Corequisites

Some courses require advance or concurrently acquired specific knowledge and skills.  Prerequisite(s) and corequisite(s) for each courses are indicated in the course description section of this catalog.   Students must have completed (or be presently enrolled in the prerequisite(s)) courses in order to register for a course with prerequisites.  Where a student was allowed to register for a course while completing the prerequisite(s), and then subsequently fails to successfully complete a prerequisite course, the student shall be dis-enrolled from the course requiring the prerequisite. In the case of a corequisite, a student must enroll in the courses during the same semester.  In some instances, where a course has an enforced “pre/corequisite” the student can elect to either take the requirement before registering for the course, or take the courses at the same time.

Registration Changes

Subject to any registration “holds” and any applicable deadlines, students may change their course registration online.  Caution should be exercised as registration changes may negatively impact eligibility for scholarships, financial aid or athletic participation, the student’s ability to progress through their degree program in a timely manner, and the student’s obligations with respect to tuition and fees.  

The Registrar’s office publishes an online schedule of “Important Dates for Students” for each semester.  The students is responsible for reviewing and adhering to the Important Dates including the deadlines to add, drop or withdraw from course(s)for the relevant semester .

Adding Courses: There are two different types of deadlines for adding courses:

  1. Last day to add a class without instructor’s signature - during the period through this date courses may be added online through myNMSU, or through your advisor (if necessary).
  2. Last day to add a class with instructor’s signature - during the period through this date courses may only be added with “Change of Schedule” form signed by the instructor (available online through the Registrar’s Office).
    * Students taking classes online and who do not live in the Las Cruces Area must email the instructor, using the NMSU email, in order to get permission to be added to the course. If the instructor approves the addition, the approved response must be sent to either the student’s advisor or to registrar@nmsu.edu with the student’s name, ID number and course CRN number they are wanting to add.

Withdrawing from Courses: There are two different types of deadlines for withdrawing from courses:

  1. Last day to drop without a “W” grade – during the period through this date, the student can drop the course and not have it appear on their official transcript in any form, and the student will have no financial obligation related to the course (students will receive a 100% refund if tuition has been paid for the course).
  2. Last day to drop with a “W” grade – during the period through this date, the student can withdraw from the course, but the course will appear on their official transcript with the withdrawal (W) designation as the grade, and the student will be responsible for the full tuition and fees related to that course.

Students are responsible for initiating official withdrawal from any course(s) which the student will not complete. Students who experience extraordinary circumstances that prevent timely registration changes should consult with their Academic Associate Dean or the Registrar.  For more information about the process for adding or withdrawing from a course(s), please speak with your advisor or contact the Registrar’s Office.

Any student attending under Veteran Educational Assistance must notify the Military and Veteran’s Programs office before processing registration changes to determine if changes will enrollment status or benefits.

A student found insufficiently prepared to carry a regular course may be transferred to a more elementary course in the same subject any day before the last day to withdraw from an individual course.

Waitlisting

Waitlisting is available for all courses across the NMSU system, except for labs that are linked to a specific lecture class. Waitlisting is an electronic list of students who are waiting to register for a filled course. Once students are put onto the waitlist, the process to get into that course is as follows:

  1. A currently enrolled student must drop the course for a seat to become available.
  2. The first student on the waitlist is notified through their NMSU email.
  3. The notified student has 24 hours to login to their myNMSU and register themselves for the class.
  4. If the first student fails to register within their allotted 24 hours, then the first student is dropped from the waitlist and the next student on the waitlist is notified. This continues until the empty seat is filled.

A student who fails to register for the class during their allotted 24 hours and is automatically dropped from the waitlist can add themselves back onto the bottom of the waitlist for that course.

Students cannot be added to the waitlist after the first day of classes. Instructor overrides can only be made after the second day of class, at this point an instructor’s signature (add/drop/withdraw slip) is required for any registration changes.

Graduate Registration Requirements for Summer

Students who have scheduled their final examination, or who are completing their thesis during a summer session, must be registered for one credit hour during the same summer session. In order to graduate during a summer session, the student must have filed the Application for Degree by the deadline posted on the Academic Calendar.

Repeating Courses for Undergraduate Students

Undergraduate students may repeat courses, for a change in grade, when the original grade earned was a D or F. Once a passing grade of B or better is earned, the course will then be substituted in the calculation of the grade-point-average and students will no longer be able to repeat that course for change of grade purposes. Both the original grade and the substituted grade will show on the students transcript.

If the student’s original grade was a D and he/she repeats the course, but receives a F, the second grade will not be substituted for the original.

Repeat options apply only to eligible courses that were completed prior to the time a student was awarded a degree at NMSU.

Repeating Courses for Graduate Students

Graduate student may repeat courses to achieve a higher grade, but the grade assigned for each attempt will remain on the transcript and will be counted in the grade point average calculation.

Substitutions and Waivers

Students registering for their final semester must have all substitutions and waivers of required courses approved before the last day of registration, during the semester in which the student expects to obtain the degree.

Auditing a Course (No Credit)

An audited course is one in which the student registers for the learning experience but does not seek to earn academic credit for the course.  A student seeking to audit a course must register and pay tuition and fees for the course and have the consent of the instructor to take the class in audit form.  A student who has registered to audit a course may be dis-enrolled from the course at any time before the registration deadline expires if necessary to accommodate a student taking the course for credit. After the last day to register, the student cannot change the course an audited course to a for credit course.

Audited courses are not used in determining a maximum class load (overload) for undergraduate students in good academic standing, however, the audited course will be included for graduate students and undergraduate students who are on academic probation.

Attendance and Student Performance

Academic success is closely correlated to student participation and attendance.  Accordingly, students are expected to regularly attend all their classes.  Each course instructor will establish the specific attendance and course requirements. Only students who are currently enrolled in a course for either credit or audit are permitted to officially attend the classes. However, individual instructors may allow an occasional visitor and may allow a student who officially withdrew from the course to continue to attend for the remainder of the semester.

Absences from Class and Failure to Complete Assignments

Students who must miss class due to accident or illness, or due to other circumstances beyond their control should consult the course syllabus and the instructor for guidance. Students may be administratively dis-enrolled from a course due to excessive absences (consecutive absences in excess of the number of class meetings held within a week or any number of absences which are impairing the student’s performance), or for persistent failure to complete assignments. In such cases, the Instructor may recommend administrative dis-enrollment by providing a completed “Student Absence/Lack of Progress Report” form to the Academic Associate Dean.   If the Academic Associate Dean agrees with the recommendation of the course instructor, the student will be dis-enrolled from the course. A dis-enrollment has the same effect as a voluntary withdrawal (see “Registration Changes” in this catalog).  Any student who has been administratively dis-enrolled from a class may appeal that decision to the Dean of the College where the course was offered within 10 days after notification of the dis-enrollment.

Any absences due to the student’s participation in a university sponsored event (e.g. ASNMSU president representing NMSU at legislative session, student athletes competing in NMSU scheduled athletic events, or students attending educational field trips and conferences) will be excused and deemed an “Authorized Absence”. Authorized absences do not relieve the student of the course assignments or responsibilities and instructors may require students to complete course work before the absence. Prior to the student’s absence, the sponsoring department will provide the instructor with written notice of the dates of expected absence.  

Classroom Conduct

Each instructor has the authority to establish and enforce reasonable rules of conduct in their courses.  A student who engages in behavior that interferes with the educational environment of the class may be administratively dis-enrolled with the approval of the academic department head and academic associate dean for the course, and with notification to the Provost. Any student who has been administratively dis-enrolled from a class may appeal that decision to the Dean of the College where the course was offered within 10 days after notification of the dis-enrollment.

Student Performance Assessment

Individual student performance and learning outcomes in a course are measured and evaluated by the course instructor and reported to the student in the form of grades.  Each instructor has the authority to establish assignments and other assessments (such as exams and quizzes) and to assign grades based on the student’s performance on those assessments.  Final grades for the course are determined by the instructor and reported to the University registrar as described in grading section of this catalog.   Any student who believes that their academic performance has been evaluated unfairly may appeal the grade through the University’s Academic Appeals process as provided in this Catalog.

Academic Program Assessment

New Mexico State University is committed to providing its students with a quality education and a supportive learning environment. Academic Program Assessment is a continuous improvement process achieved by identifying a program’s desired learning outcomes, evaluating the extent to which those outcomes are collectively achieved by students in the program, and then implementing changes to enhance and improve the collective program outcomes. For assessment to be effective, students must be actively aware of and engaged in assessment activities.

Academic Program Assessment requires participation of students who are expected to provide feedback on personal, professional and academic development and to participate in a variety of assessment exercises. Assessment activities may be a part of regular graded course assignments, or may require students to engage in other activities.  Assessments may include course projects, exams, exit interviews, standardized tests, surveys, focus groups, etc. Data gathered through these assessments is published only in aggregate form. Learn more about NMSU’s Academic Program Assessment at https://assessment.nmsu.edu/

Exam Week and Final Examinations

NMSU designates the last week of each semester as “Exam Week” during which each course has only a single 2 hour meeting time for a mandatory culminating activity which may be a final examination or some other course related activity.  The Registrar’s Office establishes the Final Examination Schedule for each semester (http://registrar.nmsu.edu/final-examination-schedule/). Examinations are typically held in the course’s usual lecture/lab room. Some departments hold Departmental Exams where all students for all sections of a particular course are required to take the final examination simultaneously.  The date, time and location of the Departmental Exams are indicated on the Final Examination Schedule.  For courses that were not scheduled to meet at the specific times listed under “Regular Class Time” on the Registrar’s Final Examination Schedule,  the instructor and course department coordinate examination dates, times and locations with NMSU’s Academic Scheduling office (575) 646-4790. Final exams for weekend courses are held at the regular class period on the last day of class.

The final exam or culminating activity must not be rescheduled for a different date, time or location, except with permission of the department head and the unanimous consent of the enrolled students. During the week before Exam Week, instructors are not allowed to hold examinations lasting more than one class period.

Any student having more than three examinations scheduled in any one day may, no later than the week prior to exam week, notify the instructor of the examination scheduled latest in the day to obtain an alternative date for that examination. (If the fourth exam is a departmental exam, the instructor of the third exam will make alternate arrangements for that exam upon request.)

Students who believe that their instructor(s) have not honored Exam Week requirements may appeal to the instructor’s department head.

Developmental Evaluation

The academic skill level of all entering first-time students at the time of registration is evaluated based upon ACT scores, SAT test scores, and if available, the NMSU Math Placement Exam score. The student’s eligibility to enroll in university level English and Mathematics courses is dependent upon this evaluation.  Any new student may choose to take the MPE to test towards a higher math placement than indicated by the ACT and high school graduation scores. All new engineering students must take the MPE. More information on the MPE is available from the Department of Mathematics website. https://www.math.nmsu.edu/msc/MPE/overview.html.  Students who have not demonstrated adequate preparation for university level courses are required to take developmental courses. Developmental courses are included on the transcript and will be included in the calculation of the GPA, but the developmental course credits do not count towards a degree.

Developmental Courses in English - Students who score below 15 on the ACT English exam will be placed into appropriate developmental English course or course(s) (prefix CCDE) before enrolling in ENGL 111G. Students who score below 13 on the ACT English will require two developmental courses before enrolling in ENGL 111G.

Developmental Courses in Math - Students who score below 23 on the ACT mathematics exam, and who did not achieve a qualifying score on the NMSU Math Placement Exam (MPE), will be placed into the appropriate development mathematics course or courses (prefix CCDM). Placement into CCDM course(s) is dependent upon the student's ACT score and high school GPA. Students are not allowed to enroll in any other math courses at NMSU until successfully completing any requisite CCDM course(s). (As an alternative to the math developmental course(s), students may complete AS 103 with a C- or better, which does earn credit toward a degree.)
 

Basic Academic Skills

All undergraduate students must demonstrate Basic Academic Skills in both English and mathematics before enrolling in any upper-division course (numbered 300 or higher).  These requirements ensure that each student in the upper-division courses has the ability to succeed without compromising the learning experience of other students. The completion of the Basic Academic Skills requirements does not necessarily result in the award of academic credit nor satisfaction of university general education requirements in English and mathematics. (Students should consult the General Education Courses and Requirements section in this chapter for these requirements.)

Transfer students with 45 or more credits are allowed to enroll in upper-division courses for only one semester before satisfying the Basic Academic Skills requirements.   The Basic Academic Skills requirements may be satisfied in a variety of different ways as listed below:

English Basic Skill Demonstration Options (achieve one of the following):

  • ACT English Score of 30
  • Coursework - ENGL 111G, or equivalent, completed with a grade of C- or higher.

Equivalents:  the following are deemed equivalents to ENGL 111G for the purpose of satisfying Basic Academic Skills in English:

  • ENGL 111H completed with a grade of C- or higher
  • ENGL 111 M - required for International students who took the TOEFL examination
  • CLEP Exam score of 57 or higher in freshman college composition
  • English Advanced Placement (AP) Exam score of 3, 4, or 5
  • English Composition Transfer Credits - 3 or more credits with a grade of C- or above, transferred from accredited post-secondary institutions (International students may be required to take ENGL 111 M as noted above.)

Credits from Non-accredited Institutions - As a general rule, NMSU does not accept credits from non-accredited institutions.  Students with 3 or more credits of college-level English composition with a grade of C- or higher from a non-accredited institution may, however, challenge the Basic Academic Skills requirement in English and English 111G course requirement by submitting a theme paper written under the supervision of, and demonstrating achievement of English 111G learning outcomes as determined by, the Department of English.

Mathematics Basic Skill Demonstration Options (achieve one of the following):

  • ACT Mathematics Score of 23
  • Coursework – any one of the following courses or course combinations completed with a grade of C- or higher in each course:
  • Basic Skills Exam Passing Score - offered twice a semester by the Department of Mathematical Sciences
  • Calculus AB, Calculus BC or Statistics Advanced Placement (AP) Exam score of 3, 4, or 5

IMPORTANT NOTE:  Basic Academic Skills Demonstration fulfillment options may not appear on the transcript, result in the award of academic credit, or satisfy general education requirements.  The Basic Academic Skills requirements are used solely for the purpose of determining eligibility for enrollment in upper-division courses.  All students should seek to complete the Basic Academic Skills requirements as early in their academic program as possible.  Students who postpone completion of Basic Academic Skills may be unable to progress toward degree completion in a timely manner.

Independent Study and Directed Reading Courses

Independent study courses and directed reading (other than those designated in the catalog with a subtitle), are for students capable of and sufficiently motivated to undertake self-directed study with limited oversight of a faculty member.  Only students who have completed at least 28 credits at NMSU under traditional grading, with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better, are eligible to enroll independent study courses. No student is entitled to enroll in independent study and enrollment requires the consent of an instructor who agrees to supervise and evaluate the student’s learning activities in the course.  Students seeking enrollment in an independent study course should prepare an independent study proposal to present to individual faculty member(s) in the relevant discipline for consideration.   At a minimum, the proposal should include the topic of study, a brief survey of the literature or other resources on the topic, and a description of the proposed written product or other tangible outcome of the independent study. The relevant academic department for the discipline may have additional requirements. Each college determines the maximum number of credits that may be earned in independent study courses.

Adjusted Credit Option

The adjusted credit option provides eligible undergraduate students who earned a low grade-point average (less than 2.0 cumulative) during their first few semesters to reset their GPA calculation. This option may be used only once and is not reversible.  These are the consequences of exercising the Adjusted Credit Option:

  1. All of the student’s academic history pre-dating the request, including all NMSU course credits previously attempted or completed, transfer coursework, CLEP, ACT, advanced placement, special examination, and/or military service are included in the adjustment and designated as “ADJUSTED CREDITS” on the transcript.  These credits are no longer be included in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average.
  2. Courses carrying an academic grade of S, CR, C- or better, earned prior to the grading period in which the student requested this option, are treated as earned academic credit and need not be repeated, except where a higher grade is required in the student’s academic program.
  3. Courses carrying an academic grade of U, CD, D or F, earned prior to the grading period in which the student requested this option, remain on the student’s transcript, but no academic credit is provided for these courses. The student must repeat these courses to obtain academic credit.
  4. The student’s academic transcripts will continue to reflect all coursework, including courses falling under the adjusted credit option. In no circumstances will a transcript be issued that does not include all courses attempted at this university.
  5. The student’s current academic status, eligibility for employment, and financial aid may be impacted. Probationary status and eligibility for on-campus employment are not affected by the exercise of the adjusted credit option.
  6. The repeat rule for courses starts anew.
  7. The student will not be eligible for award of an associate degree until earning thirty (30) or more additional credits after exercise of the Option.
  8. The student is eligible for University honors at graduation upon completing a minimum of 60 academic credits at NMSU, after the adjusted credit option is exercised, with a resulting grade point average which satisfies University regulations for honors.

After carefully considering the consequences indicated above, eligible students may exercise the Adjusted Credit Option by paying a fee of $10 and submitting an adjusted credit option application to the Office of the Registrar. The Option can only be exercised during the fall or spring semester before the last day to withdraw from the university.  Application forms are available in the offices of the academic deans. Only students meeting the following criteria are eligible to exercise the Option:

  1. No awarded baccalaureate degree
  2. Enrolled as a degree-seeking or non-degree undergraduate student
  3. Cumulative grade-point average of less than 2.0 at NMSU
  4. Fewer than 60 credits accumulated (including both transfer and NMSU credits)

Credit by College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

Prior to or during a student’s enrollment at NMSU, credits may be earned through the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board. CLEP is a national program of credit by examination that offers the opportunity to earn credits for college level achievement wherever or however the student learned. Earned CLEP credit will be treated as transfer credit without a grade, will count toward graduation, and may be used in fulfilling specific curriculum requirements. A current NMSU CLEP policy as well as test schedule information is available through Testing Services DACC East Mesa, RM 210. Testing Services may be reached at: (575) 528-7294.

Credit by Examination

Any enrolled student with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 currently attending classes may, with permission of the appropriate department, challenge by examination any undergraduate course in which credit has not been previously earned except an independent study, research or reading course, or any foreign language course that precedes the final course in the lower-division sequence. The manner of administering the examination and granting permission shall be determined by the department in which the course is being challenged. Students may not enroll in a single course, challenge it by examination, and drop it during the drop/add period, unless they enroll in an additional course. In exceptional cases in which a student demonstrates outstanding ability in a course in which he is already registered, he may be permitted to challenge the course. A student desiring to apply for special examination may obtain the necessary forms from the Office of the Registrar. The fee for challenging a course is the same as the approved tuition rate. Courses may not be challenged under the S/U option. The special examination privilege is based on the principle that the student, exclusively, has the responsibility for preparing for a special examination.

Credit for Military Service

New Mexico State University will award academic credit to United States military personnel for courses and Military Occupational Specialties (MOS), based on the American Council of Education Guide (ACE) as well as through national standardized tests, such as CLEP, AP, PEP and DANTES. Credit for military-training is in accordance with NMSU Faculty Senate Legislation Proposition 24-07/08, which was passed in May 2008. Military Training and Military Occupational Specialties (MOS) must have a recommendation evaluation by ACE (in the ACE Guide) for credit to be awarded. Courses accepted for transfer credit become part of the student’s official NMSU transcript and academic record. If a student wishes to appeal a decision regarding the acceptance of military training/education and/or MOS for academic credit, the student must submit a written statement of appeal to the Dean of the College to which the student has applied. The Dean will review the merits of the appeal and render a decision. The decision of the Dean is final.

Only Primary MOS (s) are eligible for academic credit in the initial review and evaluation. Credit for Duty and/or Secondary MOS may be eligible for academic credit if the student petitions the college’s Associate Dean. Primary MOS is the primary specialty of a soldier and reflects the broadest and most in-depth scope of military experience. Veterans, active-duty personnel, National Guard and Reservists who are current students or students applying for admission to New Mexico State University may be granted academic credit on a case-by-case basis upon evaluation of military transcripts - the Joint Service Transcript (jst.doded.mil) and the Community College of the Air Force transcripts. Course equivalencies and credit hours awarded for a particular NMSU degree are determined by colleges and/or academic departments. Credit hours may be awarded for specific courses toward degree requirement, or as elective credit. The number of credit hours awarded will be determined by the college and/or academic department.

NOTE: Students submitting military transcripts for credit evaluation must keep in mind the Maximum Time Frame policy. See Financial Aid Section.

Graduate Course Deficiencies

Students who have been admitted with departmental deficiencies may be required to take diagnostics tests and additional qualifying examinations. They must complete satisfactorily, in a manner specified by the major department, all undergraduate course deficiencies as prescribed by the department responsible for the graduate program. Courses taken to satisfy deficiencies will be listed on the undergraduate transcript; however, these course grades will not be calculated in the student’s graduate GPA or graduate hours. With the permission of the student’s advisor and the head of department, courses to meet undergraduate deficiencies may be taken under an S/U option (with S being a grade satisfactory to the professor), and such courses will not affect the maximum number of S/U graduate credits permitted.

Short Courses for Graduate Students

Short course(s) that are numbered 450 and above have been approved to carry graduate credit.  Graduate students must be registered for the short course(s) to receive graduate credit. Concurrent enrollment of graduate students in regular and short courses for the fall/spring semesters is allowed, provided the combined total credits does not exceed 15.   All short courses carrying one semester credit will be graded on an S/U basis and these credits will be counted toward the student’s limit of S/U credits.

Challenging Graduate Courses

A graduate student may challenge a graduate course by examination, please see the Graduate School for more information.

University Grading System

Each course department or instructor establishes the system for assessing student performance in achieving course learning objectives.  Students should consult the course syllabus for a description of the grading system used in each course.  At the conclusion of each course, instructors are required to report a final grade reflecting the instructor’s assessment of each student’s performance.  Shortly after the end of the term, students can access their grades through the MyNMSU portal.  No other grade notification will be issued. The final grade is reported on the student transcript.  Instructors may elect whether to use fractional grading (the use of the plus and minus) in assigning final letter grades.

The NMSU system for final grades is expressed in letters, which carry grade points that are used in calculating the cumulative grade-point average, as shown in this table:

Letter Grade Grade Points per Unit of Credit
A+ 4.0
A 4.0
A- 3.7
B+ 3.3
B 3.0
B- 2.7
C+ 2.3
C 2.0
C- 2.0
D+, D, D- 1.0
F 0
W- Withdrawal 0
N- Grade not submitted 0
CR- Credit authorized, but not letter grade 0
IP- In progress 0
RR- Progress in undergraduate course 0
PR- Progress in graduate thesis 0
S- Satisfactory work1 0
U- Unsatisfactory work 0
I- Incomplete work 0
AU- Audit 0
1

S grades are grades that are satisfactory to the professor and are normally equivalent to the letter grade of C- or higher.

Any courses for which only CR, S or PR is awarded, but no traditional letter grade is given, will be included in the total number of earned hours but is not computed in the grade-point average.  Traditional letter grades are those which are used in the grade point average determination:  A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D- and F. In computing the overall grade-point-average, the total credits in which grades of A+ through F have been assigned is divided into the total number of grade points earned.

Midterm and Six-Week Early Performance Grades

A Six-Week Early Performance Grade (sometimes referred to as Midterm Grade) for courses numbered 100-299 will be posted and available to students through the MyNMSU portal. The purpose of the early grade posting is to ensure that students have an opportunity to address any performance issues.  Students should be mindful that the Six-Week Early Performance Grade reflects a students’ performance on only that portion of the total coursework that has been graded at that time. Any student who is doing poorly, or not as well as they would like, should meet with the instructor to discuss how they can improve. Students who have concerns about their progress in multiple courses or who are considering withdrawal from course(s) must meet with their academic advisor.

In courses numbered 300 or higher, the posting of Early Performance Grades is optional and may occur through the online course management system rather than the MyNMSU portal.  However, prior to the last day to withdraw from a course, upon request, instructors will provide information to students about their progress in the course.

Retention of Grading Records

Individual assignments and exams that are not returned to students should be retained by the instructor or department through the end of the subsequent regular semester.  The records used to compute individual final grades should be retained for two years after the completion of a course. If a final grade is appealed, these records are kept for at least two years after the completion of the appeal. Departments, colleges or the library may require that records be kept for longer periods.

Minimum Grade Requirement for Graduate Students

Graduate degrees require a cumulative graduate G.P.A. of 3.0 or higher.  Although B- and C grades (including C+ and C-) earned at NMSU may be counted toward the requirements for a graduate degree in some programs, this grade does not reflect acceptable graduate-level performance and may cause the cumulative G.P.A. to fall below the 3.0 required for graduate students.  Some departments have higher grading requirements for courses in their programs.  Students should check with their departments regarding specific course grading requirements for their particular degree program.

Courses in which a student earns a D or F grade do not ever satisfy graduate degree requirements; however these grades will be calculated in determining the students’ cumulative grade-point average. To obtain academic credit, students must retake courses in which a grade of D or F was earned.   

S/U Grading

S/U grading allows the student to attempt to earn course credit without having a course grade included in their grade point average calculations.  Under S/U grading, the instructor assigns an S grade for satisfactory achievement of the course learning objectives (normally equivalent to the letter grade of C- or higher) and a U grade for unsatisfactory performance in the class. 

Designated S/U Courses

Each academic college may designate courses in which the grading will be on a basis of S or U for all students enrolled in the courses. Credits in designated S/U courses are not included in the limitations on the number of S/U credits a student may take, and are not subject to the student eligibility requirements described below.

Election of the S/U Grading Option - Undergraduate Students

In courses other than those designated as S/U for all students, eligible individual students may elect the S/U Grading Option, subject to the regulations stated below. To be eligible for the S/U (satisfactory/unsatisfactory) Grading Option, undergraduate students must meet the eligibility requirements and obtain approval of an academic advisor.  Eligibility requires completion of 28 credits at NMSU under traditional grading, with an overall average of 2.5 or better.  (Upon approval of the adjusted credit option, students must re-establish eligibility.) Non-degree seeking students may take courses under the S/U option without regard to eligibility requirements. However, these courses may not be subsequently applied toward an undergraduate degree at NMSU.

The S/U option must be elected as part of the course registration and may not be added once the course registration period closes.  Other than honors courses and courses officially designed as S/U, the following limitations apply to courses in which the S/U option is elected:

  1. No more than 7 credits per semester or 4 credits per summer session.
  2. Not to exceed a total of 21 credits towards a degree.
  3. Not a required course for the student’s major.

Students electing the S/U option should be mindful that upon a change of majors, the new major department may require a traditional grade for a course within that major that was previously completed with an S grade. In such cases, the student may request that the original instructor process a change of grade form to apply a traditional grade, however, if more than 2 years have elapsed or if the instructor is no longer at NMSU, such a change will not be possible and the student may be required to retake the course or obtain a traditional grade through a course challenge.

Election of  the  S/U Grading Option Election - Graduate Students

With an approval from their advisor and department head, graduate students in good academic standing may elect the S/U option, at the time of registration, for courses taken outside the major department, subject to the regulations stated below:

  1. No more than a total of 6 credits of elected S/U courses are permitted in the master’s degree.
  2. Doctoral candidates may take an additional 6 credits under the S/U option after application to candidacy.

I Grade Designation

The letter grade of I (incomplete) is given for passable work that could not be completed due to circumstances beyond the student’s control that develop after the last day to withdraw from the course.  In no case is an I grade to be used to avoid the assigning of D, F, U or RR grades for marginal or failing work.  Examples of appropriate circumstances include documented illness, documented death or crisis in the student’s immediate family, unexpected military deployment and similar circumstances. Other job related circumstances are generally not appropriate grounds for assigning an I grade. Students requesting an I grade are responsible for providing satisfactory evidence of such circumstances.  (In the case of medical records, instructors should review the information provided, note that adequate medical documentation was provided for review, and return the documentation to the student.  Under no circumstances should the instructor retain any medical records or indicate the specifics of any medical condition in the academic records.) The refusal to grant an I grade may be appealed in the same manner as any other final grade.

To assign an I grade, the instructor must complete the “I grade Information Form” and have the form delivered to the associate dean of the course college. The instructor must indicate on the form whether the student will be given the option to complete the remaining coursework and have the I grade changed to the earned letter grade.  If so, the instructor should indicate the steps necessary to complete the remaining coursework.  The I grade form should either be signed by the student in person, or the associate dean must send a copy of the document to the student’s official permanent address, as recorded in the Registrar’s Office, with a notation on the form that the student was not available for signature.

The I grade will be permanent in instances where (1) the instructor did not provide an option to complete the coursework, (2) the instructor left NMSU prior to completion of the coursework and grade change, or (3) the student failed to complete the coursework by the relevant deadline, and the instructor did not indicate  that the I grade would be changed to the earned grade upon failure to complete.  In such instances, the student will be required to re-enroll in the course to receive credit (in which case the permanent I grade and the subsequent earned letter grade will both appear on the transcript).

The student is entitled to have the I grade removed from the transcript only if, within 12 months or any earlier deadline established by the instructor on the “I Grade Information Form”  and prior to graduation, the student completes the remaining coursework, as specified on the Form, in a manner satisfactory to the instructor. If the student fails to complete the coursework, the instructor may change the I grade to any appropriate grade (including D, F or U) only if the instructor stated that this would occur on the “I Grade Information Form.” The instructor should assign whatever grade was earned for the entire course.

To change the I grade, the instructor must complete a “Change of Grade Form,” obtain the signature of the associate dean for the course, and submit the form to the Registrar’s Office.

RR Grade

The RR grade may be assigned only in undergraduate developmental courses (CCDE, CCDL, CCDM & CCDR) and indicates that the student has made substantial progress toward completing the requirements of the course. It carries neither penalty nor credit, so a student must re-enroll and successfully complete the course in order to earn credit. The grade of RR may be received only once in any given course, and is a permanent notation on the student’s transcript.

W Grade Designation

The W grade is assigned only in courses when the student withdraws or is administratively dis-enrolled from the course after the last day to drop the course.  The W grade is permanent.

Effect of Change of Grade

The effect of a change of grade on a student’s academic standing (scholastic warning, probation or suspension) depends on the date the transaction is officially recorded on the student’s academic record. If the transaction is recorded before the student begins another semester, the grade change (such as replacing the I grade with an earned grade) is included in the grade-point average calculation in order to establish the student’s academic standing. If the transaction is recorded after the student begins another semester, for the purpose of calculating academic standing, the new grade is included with any other grades earned for the semester in which the grade change is processed.

Grade Point Average

Grade point average (GPA) calculations are based solely on courses taken at NMSU or under an approved National Student Exchange.

Grading in Graduate Research

In grading both master’s and doctoral research, thesis and dissertation work in progress, the instructor reports for each enrollment period the grade PR (progress) or U (unsatisfactory) rather than a traditional  letter grade. These assigned grades are permanent notations on the student’s transcript. Only those credits graded PR (Progress) accumulate toward the minimum number of research credits required.

PR indicates that the student has devoted an adequate amount of time to the work scheduled but does not indicate the quality. U indicates that the student has stopped work or is doing work of unacceptable quality.

At the conclusion of the final oral examination, or when the thesis/dissertation is submitted for the final signature of the graduate dean, the instructor will report the final S or U grade for that semester. If the thesis/dissertation and the performance in the final oral examination are found to be acceptable, the instructor will report an S (satisfactory) grade. If the thesis/dissertation or the performance in the final oral examination is found to be unacceptable, the instructor will report an U (unsatisfactory) grade.

If a student accumulates a total of two U (unsatisfactory) grades in courses numbered either 598, 599, 600, 699 or 700, the student will be placed on provisional status. If three U (unsatisfactory) grades are reported for these courses, the student will be dismissed from the Graduate School.

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Withdrawal from a Single Course

Any student wishing to formally withdraw from a single course, after the last day to drop has passed, can do so through their Academic Advisor or the Registrar’s Office. All such withdrawals will be registered on the student’s transcript with the “W” grade indication.

For students wishing to withdrawal from all courses, please see the section on Withdrawal from NMSU.

Leave of Absence from the Graduate School

Students who are working on advanced degrees and plan to have an interruption in studies, for a calendar year, should request for a leave of absence through their department head. The student must submit a formal letter through their department head to the Dean of the Graduate School, an email will not be accepted. The request should include the beginning date and the anticipated ending date for the period of absence.

A graduate student on leave of absence will be expected not to use university facilities and place no demands upon the university faculty and staff, and, therefore will pay no fees. Time spent in the “leave-of-absences” status will not be counted toward the advanced degree time limits.

A graduate student who fails to register for one calendar year without obtaining a leave of absence from the Graduate School will be considered withdrawn from the university, by the Graduate School. In order to resume their studies after such absences, the student must go through the formal readmission process.

Administrative Withdrawals

An administrative withdrawal is initiated for a student who is representing the university at an official out-of-town event and becomes effective when the student returns from the event or five class days after the signed drop slip gets to the dean’s office.

Military Withdrawal

New Mexico State University understands that our military and Veteran students may be called to active duty, specialized training, or disaster relief efforts with little notice. U.S. active duty military students wishing to withdraw from all their classes must present their orders and their request for full withdrawal, as indicated below. However, the below policy does not pertain to a student’s basic and/or annual training. A student who has an order for training is encouraged to formally request, through the proper military chain of command, a postponement of their orders until the summer or the end of the semester they are currently enrolled in. If a student’s request for postponement is denied, the student may then follow the below steps but must provide documentation that their postponement request was formally denied.

All NMSU students that have been called up for active duty must take the following steps in order to withdraw from all their classes:

  1. Military and Veterans Programs (MVP): VA students ordered to Active Duty must provide a copy of orders to the MVP office, in Corbett Center Student Union, Room 244. To assist in reporting accurate information to the VA Regional Office, student should also provide, in writing, last day of class attendance.
  2. NMSU Registrar: All students presenting their orders to the Registrar’s Office, (575) 646-3411, will receive a military withdrawal from classes and a full tuition and fees refund for that semester.
  3. Bookstore: Students who still have their receipts for textbooks purchased the semester in which they are called to active duty will be given a full refund for these textbook purchases when they present their orders. (575) 646-4431.

Student Medical Withdrawal

A student medical withdrawal applies to a student who becomes seriously ill, injured or hospitalized and is therefore unable to complete an academic term for which they are enrolled. This action applies to all courses a student is registered for in the affected semester(s). The student cannot select which courses they want to withdraw from and which they want to remain registered for when exercising this option. The students’ attending physician must provide a letter, on official letterhead with an original signature, stating the date(s) within the semester that the student was under medical care and must withdraw because of that medical condition. This letter must be submitted within the semester or no later than one academic year after the end of the term for which the withdrawal is being requested.

Once the information is reviewed a final determination will be made if the student is eligible for the consideration of tuition or other refunds (students receiving funds awarded by the University Financial Aid and Scholarship Services should be aware of policies regarding withdrawal from the University). At the Las Cruces campus, medical withdrawal begins and ends at the Registrar’s Office. At all other campuses, medical withdrawal begins at the Student Services Office but is ultimately finalized with the Registrar’s Office on the Las Cruces campus.

Medical Conditions of a Family Member Withdrawal

A student who is withdrawing because of a medical condition of an immediate family member must submit a letter from the family member’s attending physician.This action applies to all courses a student is registered for in the affected semester(s). The student cannot select which courses they want to withdraw from and which they want to remain registered for when exercising this option. It must be on official letterhead with an original signature, stating the date(s) within the semester that the student’s immediate family member was under medical care and that the student must withdraw to attend to the immediate family member’s medical condition. This letter must be submitted within the semester or no later than one academic year at the end of the term for which the withdrawal is being requested.

Immediate family member, in this instance, includes a spouse; a domestic partner, as defined in the NMSU Policy Manual 7.04; a child, parent or legal guardian; a sister or brother and a grandparents or a grandchild. Familial relationships that are created by law are also included (i.e. mother/father in law; half or step siblings); any other relationships can be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Once the information is reviewed a final determination will be made if the student is eligible for consideration of tuition or other refunds (Students receiving funds awarded by the University Financial Aid and Scholarship Services should be aware of policies regarding withdrawal from the University.) At the Las Cruces campus, medical withdrawal begins at the Registrar’s Office. At all other campuses, medical withdrawal begins at the Student Services Office.

Withdrawal from NMSU

Withdrawal from any NMSU campus is an official procedure that must be:

  1. Initiated by the student (using the Withdrawal form)
  2. Have all necessary signatures (as indicated on the form)
  3. Be approved and processed through the Registering Office, located on the Las Cruces Campus

Students who withdraw from all courses for the semester should do so in person through the Registrar’s Office. However, students who are unable to come in person may submit an e-mail using their NMSU e-mail account to registrar@nmsu.edu. Students who leave without following the official procedure are graded appropriately by the instructor.

Applicable dates for the last day to withdrawal are published on the approved university academic calendar or under important dates at: http://registration.nmsu.edu.

A student who withdraws from all classes for the semester will retain access to their NMSU account per current policy but will lose access to other services and privileges available to enrolled students.

Financial information concerning drops and withdrawals can be found at http://uar.nmsu.edu/withdrawals/. Financial Aid Recipients should contact University Financial Aid and Scholarship Services before withdrawing. Students receiving funds awarded by the University Financial Aid and Scholarship Services should be aware of policies regarding withdrawal from the University.

The Federal Higher Education Act requires the University to calculate a Return of Federal Student Aid Funds for students who withdraw (officially or unofficially) from all classes on or before the 60 percent attendance point in the semester. Using a pro-rata schedule, the percentage of the semester attended is used to calculate the amount of the student’s earned versus unearned Federal student aid funds. The unearned portion of Federal student aid funds will be returned to the appropriate aid program(s). Students withdrawing from classes are responsible for payment of any balance due after the required return of Federal student aid funds.

Graduation Requirements

For specific graduation requirements for any degree offered at NMSU please see the Degrees, Majors, Minors and Other Academic Programs of Study section, as well as the departmental sections for those requirements. These requirements will include the minimum GPA, total credits and specific course requirements for graduation.

Applying for a Degree

Any students that are in their final semester of classes are considered degree candidates and are required to submit an “Application for Degree” as well as pay graduation fees for each degree being sought. The application for Degree form is available online through the MyNMSU website. It must be completed and submitted by the designated deadline for that semester. The fees for the Las Cruces campus are all listed in the Tuition, Fees and other Expenses section of the catalog, once a student submits the application the fee will be included in the total cost for the semester or session in which the candidate anticipates completing their degree requirements.

If degree requirements are not completed during the semester/ session the student originally applied for, the student must then reapply and pay the appropriate fees. A $25 late fee applies to applications received after the application deadline, and no applications will be accepted after the posted deadline date.

A student must specify which catalog they are using for their degree requirements in order for the university to determine if the requirements are met and if a degree can be certified. The latest date for substitution or waiver of required courses for degree candidates is two weeks after the last date of registration for regular or summer terms.

Attendance at the Commencement Ceremony

Commencement is a symbolic ceremony. Participation in commencement does not, in itself, mean that a student is considered an NMSU graduate. In order to be awarded a degree, a student must fulfill university requirements as determined by academic colleges. The degree will reflect the graduation date from the application for degree in which all degree requirements were determined by the academic colleges.

The academic colleges will confirm the students eligibility to participate in the commencement ceremony that is held at the close of the fall and spring semesters. Eligible candidates who are in the process of completing their final degree requirements and degree recipients from the previous summer session will participate in the fall ceremony. Students who are in the process of completing their final degree requirements in the spring must attend the spring ceremony. However, Bachelor degree candidates that wish to participate in a spring commencement, prior to completing degree requirements in summer school may do so if they meet the following conditions:

  1. Receive permission the Dean of their college
  2. Show a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.0
  3. Only need 12 or fewer credit hours to complete their degree requirements
  4. These remaining credit hours must be offered in the upcoming summer schedule of classes
  5. Submit a degree application and approved petition form (available in the Dean’s office) by the last day to apply for a degree in the spring semester.

Academic Regalia

Each college may approve distinctive symbols to be worn by the top 10 percent of its graduates at commencement. Only one symbol may be worn by each graduate. In addition, the student with the highest honors in each college may wear a crimson- colored gown. No other symbolic additions to academic regalia are allowed without the approval of the Academic Deans Council.

Diploma

All fees and bills owed the university must be paid in full before a student may receive a diploma or official transcripts. The degree title and major(s) will be printed on the diplomas, in accordance to the degree application award, determined by the academic colleges. Academic honors will also be printed on the diplomas below the degree and major(s). The name on the diploma will reflect the student’s current official NMSU records. Name changes are only processed for currently admitted students.

Diplomas will be mailed to graduates approximately eight weeks after the individual colleges certify the degree requirements and the final grades have been processed by the Registrar’s Office. The diploma will be mailed to the address specified on the degree application, unless an address change was requested before the last day of the semester.

Undergraduate Academic Standing

When a student does not maintain adequate academic standing, he/she is placed in Academic Warning. If the student's academic standing does not improve, the placement progresses to Academic Probation I. Continued unimproved academic standing moves a student into Academic Probation II, then finally, Academic Suspension. Each stage imposes more structure and limitations on the student in order to help them return to normal academic standing. The intent is not to punish, but to help the student return to normal academic standing and success. Since some of these limitations involve limitations on the number of credit hours, students on Probation or Suspension may be subject to loss of financial aid. It is the responsibility of the student to determine the impact of their changed academic standing on their financial aid. Notification to students of academic warning, probation, or suspension appears on the student’s grade report at the end of each grading period.

Undergraduate Academic Warning

Issued only once, the first time a student's cumulative GPA falls below a 2.0 while in good academic standing. The relevant Associate Dean for Academics or Campus Academic Officer (CAO) will send the student a letter detailing the consequences should the cumulative grade point remain below a 2.0 at the conclusion of the semester. A student on Academic Warning remains eligible for all extracurricular activities as governed by the rules of the specific activity.

While under Academic Warning the following restrictions apply:

  1. The student may be required to enroll in a 3-credit hour special study skills/time management course specifically designed for students on Academic Warning, or an equivalent course approved by the appropriate associate dean or CAO of their campus.
  2. Students will be required to enter into a contract with their advisor, approved by their department head that places further stipulations on Academic Warning. The contract may include, but is not limited to the following:
  3. The student may be required to take at least one repeat course to try to improve their GPA.
  4. Except for the special study skills/time management course, the student’s coursework may be restricted to their major.
  5. The student may be required to get tutoring help.
  6. The student may be required to see an academic counselor on a specified time schedule.
  7. The number of credit hours a student may register for may be restricted (due to extenuating circumstances such as the student’s workload commitments).

The associate dean or CAO may place the student on Academic Probation I should the student not adhere to the stipulations of the contract.

If the student’s semester GPA is less than a 2.0, and the cumulative GPA remains below a 2.0 at the end of the semester on Academic Warning, the student is placed on Academic Probation I. If the semester GPA is greater than 2.0 but the cumulative GPA is still less than 2.0, the student will remain on Academic Warning. If the cumulative GPA is greater than a 2.0 at the end of the semester then the student is returned to good academic standing.

Undergraduate Academic Probation I

This occurs when a student under Academic Warning has a semester GPA less than 2.0, and the cumulative GPA remains below 2.0 at the conclusion of the semester or if the student maintains a semester GPA greater than 2.0 while on Academic Probation I but the cumulative GPA is still less than 2.0.

Under Academic Probation I the following conditions apply:

  1. The student cannot enroll in more than 13 hours of coursework during the semester. Note: Students falling below 12 credits in any one semester will jeopardize their financial aid. Should this occur, students should see the associate dean in their college as soon as possible to try to implement corrective measures.
  2. The student will enter into a contract or individualized education plan with their advisor and approved by the associate dean or CAO that place further stipulations on Academic Probation I. The associate dean or CAO may place the student on Academic Probation II or Academic Suspension should the student not adhere to the stipulations of the contract.
  3. Students on Academic Probation receiving educational benefits from the Veterans’ Administration must obtain counseling from the Military & Veterans Programs Office.
  4. Students admitted under special provisions whose transcripts indicate less than a 2.0 GPA are admitted on Academic Probation I.

The student must maintain a semester GPA equal to or greater than 2.0 until such time that the cumulative GPA is greater than 2.0 at which time the student goes back to good academic standing. Until the transition happens the student remains on Academic Probation I. The student will be placed on Academic Probation II if he/she is unable to maintain a 2.0 semester GPA, and the cumulative remains below a 2.0 GPA, while under Academic Probation I. A student on Academic Probation I remains eligible for all extracurricular activities as governed by the rules of the specific activity.

Undergraduate Academic Probation II

Academic Probation II is issued in two ways.

  • The first is when a student falls below a semester 2.0 GPA and the cumulative GPA remains below a 2.0 while on Academic Probation I.
  • The second is when a student maintains a semester GPA greater than 2.0 while on Academic Probation II but the cumulative GPA is still less than 2.0.

The following restrictions are in place for student's in Academic Probation II:

  1. The student cannot enroll in more than 7 credit hours of coursework during the semester.
  2. As with rule 2 under Academic Warning and Academic Probation I and at the discretion of the associate dean or CAO, the student will be required to enter into a contract with their advisor, approved by the associate dean or CAO, to place further stipulations on Academic Probation II.

The associate dean or CAO may place the student on Academic Suspension should the student not adhere to the stipulations of the contract.

The student must maintain a semester 2.0 GPA or higher until the cumulative GPA reaches a 2.0 or higher at which time they are placed on good academic standing. A student unable to maintain a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher, and the cumulative remains below 2.0 GPA, while under Probation II will be placed on Academic Suspension. A student on Academic Probation II remains eligible for all extracurricular activities as governed by the rules of the specific activity.

Continuing in Probationary Status

Students may continue to enroll while on Academic Probation I or II provided they maintain a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher. If they withdraw from the university while on Academic Probation, they continue on that same level of Academic Probation.

Removal of Academic Probation

Such academic standing is removed when the cumulative GPA is raised to 2.0 or higher, with the following exceptions:

  1. a transfer student may not remove probation by summer work alone;
  2. if an I grade is removed after the student has enrolled, the new grade’s effect on academic standing is based on its inclusion with grades for the term for which the student is enrolled;
  3. exercise of the Adjusted Credit Option does not change academic status until subsequent grades are earned.

Academic Suspension

When a student does not achieve a semester 2.0 GPA or higher, and the cumulative remains below a 2.0 while under Academic Probation II, they are placed on Academic Suspension. Students under Academic Suspension are not allowed to take NMSU courses while under suspension. Students on Academic Suspension must sit out a minimum of 1 semester and then petition the Provost or designee to be removed from Academic Suspension. At this time the suspension status will be evaluated for possible removal. Should the suspension be lifted, the student is placed on Academic Probation II until such time as the cumulative GPA equals or exceeds a 2.0. At the discretion of the Provost or designee, the student will enter into a contract approved by the Provost or designee and the student’s Dean or CAO, setting stipulations to have the suspension removed. Failure to adhere to the contract will return the student to Academic Suspension.

Under certain conditions, a student may be re-admitted at NMSU under regular status while under Academic Suspension when satisfactory progress has been demonstrated at another college or university (see Readmission- Degree Seeking). Credits earned at another university or college while under Academic Suspension from NMSU or another university or college will be accepted at NMSU only after the student demonstrates satisfactory progress over a period of two semesters after being re-admitted or admitted to NMSU. Acceptance of transfer credits that count toward degree requirements is still governed by the rules established by the student’s respective college or campus.

Rescinding Academic Suspension for Summer Attendance

A student may use summer classes to try to get warning or probationary status removed. Students suspended at the close of the spring semester may have their Academic Suspension rescinded if they attend summer session at NMSU or one of its Community College colleges. Such attendance must raise the combined spring semester and summer GPA to 2.0 or better. Under no circumstances may a student on Academic Warning or Academic Probation be allowed to register for an overload. Academic Warning status is continued if the student withdraws from the university and the probation or suspension status applies to all subsequent enrollments.

A certification of eligibility to attend summer sessions at NMSU after a spring semester Academic Suspension is available to the suspended student who wishes to attend summer sessions at other institutions.

Graduate Academic Probation and Suspension

Graduate Academic Standing is based on both the student's semester GPA and cumulative GPA.

Graduate Academic Probation I: A graduate student is placed on Graduate Academic Probation I when a graduate student's semester GPA is above a 3.0 and the cumulative GPA drops below 3.0; or when the semester and cumulative GPA's drop below 3.0 and the previous academic standing is Graduate Regular Good Standing.

Graduate Academic Probation II: Is issued when a graduate student semester GPA is above a 3.0 and the cumulative GPA drops below as 3.0 and the previous academic standing is one of Graduate Academic Probation I or Graduate Re-admit on Probation I.

The student must maintain a semester GPA of 3.0 or higher until the cumulative GPA reaches a 3.0 or higher at which time the graduate student is placed on Good Academic Standing. If the graduate student is unable to maintain a semester GPA of 3.0 or higher and the cumulative remains below 3.0 GPA while under Graduate Academic Probation II, the student will then be placed on Graduate Academic Suspension.

Graduate Academic Suspension: When a graduate student does not achieve a semester GPA of 3.0 or higher, and the graduate cumulative GPA remains below a 3.0 while under Graduate Academic Probation II or Graduate Re-Admit on Probation II, the graduate student is placed on Graduate Academic Suspension.

Graduate students under Graduate Academic Suspension are barred from enrolling in graduate level courses at NMSU while under Graduate Academic Suspension. Graduate students on Graduate Academic Suspension must sit out a minimum of one semester. Graduate students on suspension who wish to continue Graduate School after suspension must re-apply to the Graduate School and petition the Graduate Dean or College Academic Dean to be removed from Graduate Academic Suspension. At this time the graduate academic suspension status will be evaluated for possible removal. Should the suspension be lifted, the graduate student is placed on Graduate Academic Probation II or Graduate Re-admit on Probation II until such time that the graduate cumulative GPA equals or exceeds 3.0.

If you have questions about your academic standing, please contact the advising center or Graduate Dean's office.

Academic Misconduct and Grievances

Both Undergraduate and Graduate students at NMSU are expected to observe and maintain the highest academic, ethical, and professional standards of conduct. Students should consult Section III of the Student Code of Conduct in the Student Handbook (http://studenthandbook.nmsu.edu) for more specific information regarding the rules of conduct and definitions of misconduct. Any student found guilty of academic misconduct shall be subject to disciplinary action. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to, the following actions:

  1. Cheating or knowingly assisting another student in committing an act of cheating or other forms of academic dishonesty
  2. Plagiarism, which includes, but is not necessarily limited to: submitting examinations, themes, reports, drawings, laboratory notes, undocumented quotations, computer-processed materials, or other material as one’s own work when such work has been prepared by another person or copied from another person.
  3. Unauthorized possession of examinations, reserve library materials, or laboratory materials.
  4. Unauthorized changing of grades on an examination, in an instructor’s grade book, or on a grade report or unauthorized access to academic computer records.
  5. Nondisclosure or misrepresentation in filling out applications or other university records in, or for, academic departments or colleges.

Disciplinary Suspension or Expulsion Due to Academic Misconduct

NMSU expects all students, both Undergraduate and Graduate, to regard themselves as responsible citizens on all campuses (including Alamogordo, Carlsbad, Dona Ana and Grants) and in the community. Repeated misconduct and major violations will cause the student to be subject to immediate suspension or expulsion from the university.

Students are subject to the general rules and regulations applicable in the Student Code of Conduct of the Student Handbook (http://studenthandbook.nmsu.edu).

Procedures to Deal with Cases of Alleged Academic Misconduct

Policies and procedures for dealing with such cases are detailed in the in the Student Code of Conduct http://studenthandbook.nmsu.edu/. Procedures include all course levels and all of the campuses of New Mexico State University, including Alamogordo, Carlsbad, Dona Ana, Grants and Las Cruces.

  • Undergraduate Students: Questions concerning these policies and procedures should be addressed to the Dean of the Academic College
  • Graduate Students: Questions concerning these policies and procedures should be addressed to the Dean of the Graduate School.

Undergraduate Academic Appeals Board

Within each college of the university or the library, an academic appeals board will be appointed by the associate dean for academics to hear student appeals. The appeals board will consist of three faculty members and two students.

Procedure for Initiating Grievance Complaints for Undergraduate Students

This procedure has been established to provide a method to resolve undergraduate student grievances at the lowest administrative level in a fair and expeditious manner.

For the purpose of this procedure, grievances are limited to alleged violations of university policy or procedures by the university or its employees, disputes with faculty and/or alleged unfair treatment. Usually this method is used to appeal a grade the student feels was not justified. Under no condition should these policies be used when the student has allegedly violated the University Code of Conduct or a contractual agreement, and at no hearing should either party have a lawyer. Any student who believes that he/she has been unjustly treated within the academic process may proceed as far as necessary in the steps detailed below. Should the alleged grievance not involve a faculty member or course, the student is to appeal directly to the department head or associate dean for academics in whose area or college the alleged grievance occurred.

The following are the steps and procedures for initiating a Grievance Complaint:

  1. Appeal to the faculty member: The student is to submit a written appeal to the faculty member within 30 days after the start of the semester following the semester in which the alleged grievance occurred. Semester in this case refers to fall and spring only. If the alleged grievance occurs during the summer session, the student is to submit an appeal no later than 30 days into the fall semester following the summer session in which the alleged grievance occurred. The faculty member and the student are to discuss the problem. The faculty member will submit a written report outlining his or her decision to the student and department head or appropriate unit designee within ten working days of receiving the student’s written appeal.
  2. Appeal to the department head or appropriate unit designee: If a decision satisfactory to the student cannot be reached, the student may submit a written appeal to the department head or appropriate unit designee in which the course in question is taught. This is to be done within ten days of the receipt of the faculty member’s written decision. The faculty member, the department head or appropriate unit designee, and the student are to meet to discuss the problem. The department head or appropriate unit designee will send a written response outlining his or her decision to the student and faculty member within ten days of this meeting.
  3. Appeals to the associate dean for academics or associate dean of the library: If a satisfactory decision cannot be reached among the department head or appropriate unit designee, the faculty member, and the student, the student or the faculty member may submit a written state of appeal to the associate dean for academics of the college in which the course was taught. This is to be done within ten working days after the receipt of the written decision by the department head. The associate dean may request a written recommendation from an Academic Appeals Board. Should this be the case, the Academic Appeals Board will conduct a hearing with the student and faculty member (not necessarily at the same time) to review the merits of the appeal. They may also ask for supporting evidence for or against the appeal. The Academic Appeals Board will submit the written recommendation to the associate dean within five working days following the conclusion of their process. The associate dean may meet with the student, faculty member, and department head to discuss the appeal (not necessarily at the same time). The associate dean will submit a written response outlining his or her decision to the student, faculty member, department head, and dean within ten days of the last meeting.
  4. Appeals to the dean: The dean of the college or library in which the course is taught or in whose college the alleged grievance occurred may, at his or her discretion, review the appeal upon the written request of the student or faculty member and render a final decision. An appeal to the dean is the last step in the appeals process and the dean’s decision cannot be appealed further. Should the dean not choose to review the appeal, the decision of the associate dean for academics or associate dean of the library is final.
  5. Exceptions to the time involved: The associate dean for academics or associate dean of the library may waive the normal time frame for appeals for compelling reasons. Regardless of circumstances, academic appeals must be initiated with the course instructor within two years of the conclusion of the semester or summer session in which the course was taken.
  6. Enrollment: A student need not be enrolled at the university to initiate an appeal.

Graduate Student Appeals Board

Each academic year a standing committee, consisting of three members of the graduate faculty and two graduate students, is appointed by the dean of Graduate School to handle grievance complaints including grade appeals. Any graduate who believes that he or she has been unjustly treated within the academic process may proceed as far as necessary in the following steps to resolve his or her grievance. In general, there are three levels at which a grievance can be addressed:

  • a course instructor or advisor,
  • a department head, or
  • the dean of the Graduate School.

If the initial grievance is with an instructor or advisor, the process begins at Step 1. If the initial grievance is with a departmental committee, the process begins at Step 3. In all instances, the process must begin at the lowest possible level.

  1. Under normal circumstances, the student should discuss the issue with the instructor/advisor.
  2. If the student is unable to resolve the issue through consultation with the faculty member, the student must submit a written memorandum detailing the grievance to the course instructor or advisor within 10 calendar days of the beginning of the following full (i.e., fall or spring) semester. The person to whom the memorandum is addressed must respond in writing within ten calendar days to the student.
  3. If the student is not satisfied with the response from Steps 1-2, he or she must submit a written appeal to the department head within ten working days of the initial decision. If the student is initiating the appeal at the departmental level, he or she must do so, in writing, within ten calendar days of the beginning of the following full (i.e., fall or spring) semester. The department head must respond in writing within ten working days to the student, the instructor or advisor (if one is involved), and the dean of Graduate School.
  4. If the student is not satisfied with the response from Steps 1-3, they must submit a written grade appeal letter to the academic dean’s office of the college where the course is taught. If it is a grievance against a faculty member, then the academic dean’s office where the course is taught would be that of the faculty member’s college. The student has ten calendar days after receiving the decision of the department head. The associate dean of the given college has ten days to collect the necessary documents to make a decision on the student’s appeal or grievance. Please note that additional days may be required to collect information from the faculty and/or student involved in the case. The academic dean’s office where the course is taught may convene an ad hoc committee to investigate the case.
  5. If after the fourth step the student or any of the other parties involved is still not satisfied with the response, he or she must present to the dean of the Graduate School within ten working days a formal letter that provides specific details regarding the nature of the grievance. Copies of all documents including course materials and grades must accompany the letter. In the letter, the student can request that their case be presented to the Graduate Student Appeals Board. After receiving a letter complaint (not an email), the dean of the Graduate School will determine whether the complaint has merit. He or she will do so after reviewing the letters from the faculty member, the department head and the office of the academic dean as well as the materials from the student and all those involved in the case. If the graduate dean determines that the appeal does not have merit, he or she will inform the appellant and other parties, in writing, within ten working days of receiving the appeal. Please note that additional days may be required to collect information from the faculty and/or student involved in the case. If the graduate dean decides that the appeal does have merit, he or she will convene the Graduate Student Appeals Board, normally within three weeks. The Graduate Student Appeals Board will conduct, within 60 days of their convening, whatever investigations and deliberations are necessary, and will forward to the dean of the Graduate School a recommendation to resolve the grievance.
  6. After reviewing the recommendation of the Graduate Student Appeals Board, the dean of Graduate School will, within ten working days, inform all parties involved of his or her decision in writing.
  7. The dean of the Graduate School may waive the normal time frame for grievances when either party presents compelling evidence justifying such a delay, but grievances must be launched within one year. Grade appeals involving charges of plagiarism must follow the process established on academic misconduct in the Student Code of Conduct., the web site is http://studenthandbook.nmsu.edu/. The Graduate School strongly encourages students to study and use the Plagiarism web site of the Library to learn of ways to avoid plagiarism: http://nmsu.libguides.com/plagiarism.

Privacy Rights

The following information has been designated as directory information and is subject to release to the public under the Buckley Amendment (PL 98-380), “The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974:” student’s name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, student ID number, honors and awards and dates of attendance.

Other information regarding disclosure of student data is posted at the Registrar’s Office in compliance with the Act.

Requests for withholding directory information must be filed in writing with the Registrar’s Office. A student may choose to hide his/her address and phone number from the campus phonebook through the myNMSU portal. This will only hide the information from the public but the records will still be officially kept within the Registrar’s Office.

Social Security Numbers in Student Records

As required by law, social security numbers are collected from prospective and current students who are either applying for admission to the university or plan to seek employment on campus. The social security number is a confidential record and is maintained as such by the university in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

In addition, the university is mandated by federal tax regulations to provide tuition and fee payment information to the student and the Internal Revenue Service so that applicable educational tax credits may be computed. The social security number will be necessary to submit this tax reporting.

Change in Demographic Information

Students wishing to make a formal name change, social security number update or a gender update can do so through the Registrar’s Office. All students will need to fill out the “Demographic Change form” located at https://registrar.nmsu.edu/forms/ and provide one of the following documents to the Registrar’s Office.

  1. Name change: students will need one legal documentation with the new name on it. This can be a Government Issued ID (drivers license, state card or valid passport), a Birth Certificate, a Court Order, a Marriage Certificate/Divorce Decree or a Certificate of Naturalization/Green Card. * Note: Documentation is not required to add/delete hyphen, space, apostrophe, or to abbreviate a middle name to initial.
  2. Social Security Number Update: students will need to bring the updated and signed Social Security Card. Unsigned cards will not be accepted until the signature is added.
  3. Gender Update: students will need to bring a Government Issued ID (drivers license, state ID card or valid passport) and a Revised Birth Certificate

For more information about the specific documents that are needed please contact the Registar’s Office at (575) 646-3411.

Students may update their “preferred name” which is the name used in lieu of a student’s legal name on certain documents, such as, the email display name, learning management system, the phonebook, class rosters and advisee lists. This can be done by the student through the myNMSU portal and does not need to be done at the Registrar’s Office.

Changes in Residency Status

The Registrar’s Office does not determine the laws and rulings for determining Residency, these are state laws that the Registrar’s Office simply administers. An individual must establish legal residency in New Mexico before he or she is entitled to pay in-state tuition rates. 

The student’s initial residency status is determined at the time of admission, any changes to this status must be initiated by the student through the Registrar’s Office. A continuing student, classified as a non-resident, who has satisfied the requirements to establish residency may submit a Petition for In-State Residency Tuition Classification along with the required supporting documentation to the Registrar’s Office.  Petitions must be filed on or before the census date of the semester effective.

For specific information about the process of petitioning for In-State Residency or for information about who is eligible for residency for tuition purposes please visit the https://registrar.nmsu.edu/residency/ website or the Registrar’s Office on the Las Cruces campus.

Official Transcripts

An official transcript is the University’s certified statement of your complete NMSU academic record in chronological order by semester and year. It includes the student’s coursework, grades and any degrees that were awarded. Any credit hours earned through transfer work are not listed in detail, but do appear as cumulative totals. Official transcripts will not be released if the student is in debt to the university.

Transcripts can either be ordered in person at the Registrar’s Office or online at https://registrar.nmsu.edu/transcripts/, there will be a fee for these that may vary depending on the total number of transcripts ordered and the type of delivery method that is selected. A student can request two types of transcripts an electronic one, which is sent as a secured PDF or a printed hard copy that can be delivered in a sealed envelope.

The name that will appear on the student’s transcript will match the name on the student’s official NMSU record. Name changes will only be processed for current NMSU or Community College students.

Purging of Student Files

All academic files for students who attend NMSU are kept for five years following the student’s final enrollment. Only archival documentation will be retained. The files of students who do not enroll for one year after being admitted are destroyed.