HON-HONORS (HON)

HON 115. Journeys of Discovery

1 Credit

Weekly conversations among students and a faculty member; organized around a particular subject and a small selection of readings. The seminars illuminate the many paths of discovery explored by the New Mexico State University faculty.

Prerequisite(s): Honors eligible.

HON 200. Cognitive Science

3 Credits

An interdisciplinary investigation of intelligence. Core disciplines include cognitive psychology, computer science (artificial intelligence), philosophy, and linguistics. Examination of perception, memory, language, reasoning, problem solving, and consciousness from the varying perspectives of the core disciplines.

HON 205G. Life, Energy, and Evolution

4 Credits (3+3P)

Principles of modern biological science with discussion on the impact of this science in today's world. Selected topics include principles of metabolism, genetics, physiology, evolution, and ecology. Students who pass HON 205G will fulfill the same requirements fulfilled by BIOL 111G and BIOL 111GL.

HON 208G. Music in Time and Space

3 Credits

Survey of music as it interacts with art, mathematics, science (acoustics), and ideas from exotic cultures through the history of Western civilization.

HON 214. Successful Fellowship Writing

1 Credit

Same as HON 314, for freshmen and sophomores.

HON 216G. Encounters with Art

3 Credits

A multicultural examination of the principles and philosophies of the visual arts and the ideas expressed through them.

HON 218. Women Across Cultures

3 Credits

Historical and critical examination of women's contributions worldwide with emphasis on the issues of representation that have contributed to exclusion and marginalization of women and their achievements. Restricted to: Main campus only. Crosslisted with: W S 202G

HON 219G. Earth, Time, and Life

4 Credits (3+3P)

Covers how the earth's materials form, processes involved in changing the earth's configuration, and extent of people's dependence upon the earth's resources. Includes mineral and energy resources, development of landscapes, environmental problems, evolution of the earth and life forms. May be taken in place of GEOL 111G.

HON 222G. Foundations of Western Culture

3 Credits

Critical reading of seminal texts relating to the foundations of culture and values in Western civilization, from ancient Greece to about 1700. Focus on the development of concepts of nature, human nature, and the state.

HON 225G. History of Ethics

3 Credits

A critical examination of questions with respect to the meaning and justification of moral judgments and principles. Provides a basic preparation for serious study of contemporary moral problems.

HON 227G. Plato and the Discovery of Philosophy

3 Credits

Examines arguments and theories found in the Platonic dialogues with a view to determining the nature and value of philosophy both from Plato's point of view and absolutely.

HON 228G. Religion and the State

3 Credits

Moral and political questions that arise in connection with church-state relations, including religious toleration, separation of church and state, the individual's moral duty to ignore religious convictions when performing functions of democratic citizenship, and the extent to which these ideas are embodied in our nation s traditions.

HON 229G. The New Testament as Literature

3 Credits

Literature of the New Testament examined from a literary perspective. Emphasis on translation history of the New Testament, generic features of gospel, epistle and apocalypse, precedent literary models, problems of authorship, classification of New Testament texts.

HON 230G. Bamboo and Silk: The Fabric of Chinese Literature

3 Credits

Introductory survey of traditional and modern Chinese prose and poetry in translation with emphasis on genre, theme, and social/historical context.

HON 232G. The Human Mind

3 Credits

Examination of the current understanding of the intricate relationship between mind and matter, with particular emphasis on the functional organization of the human brain. Evolutionary origins of this functional design and its implications for understanding human emotional and cognitive processes.

HON 233. Social Problems

3 Credits

Introduction to contemporary social problems from multiple perspectives. Discussions of definition, impact, and prospective solutions to major social issues, such as crime, drug abuse, social inequality, family, population, environment, and social change.

HON 234G. The Worlds of Arthur

3 Credits

Arthurian texts and traditions from medieval chronicle histories to modern novels. Emphasis on both the continuities of the Arthurian tradition and the diversity of genres, media, and cultures that have given expression to the legend.

HON 235G. Window on Humanity

3 Credits

Anthropology is the most humanistic of the sciences, and the most scientific of the humanities. This course will use anthropological perspectives to examine the human experience from our earliest origins, through the experiences of contemporary societies. We will gain insights into the influence of both culture and biology on shaping our shared human universals, and on the many ways in which human groups are diverse. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only.

HON 237G. Archaeology: Search for the Past

3 Credits

A critical evaluation of various approaches to understanding prehistory and history. The methods and theories of legitimate archaeology are contrasted with fantastic claims that invoke extraterrestrials, global catastrophes, transoceanic voyages, and extra-sensory perception. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only.

HON 239G. Medieval Understandings: Literature and Culture in the Middle Ages

3 Credits

Intensive, interdisciplinary introduction to the thought and culture of medieval Europe. Core texts will include works by St. Augustine, Marie de France, and Dante, as well as anonymous works such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, all supplemented by study of medieval art, architecture, philosophy, and social history.

HON 242G. Claiming an American Past

3 Credits

Survey of history of the United States in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with an emphasis on multicultural social and cultural history. Focus on understanding American history from the point of view of dispossessed, impoverished, and disenfranchised Americans who have fought to claim both their rights as Americans and American past.

HON 248G. The Citizen and the State: Great Political Issues

3 Credits

The fundamental questions of politics: why and how political societies are organized, what values they express, and how well they satisfy those normative goals and the differing conceptions of citizenship, representation, and freedom.

HON 249G. American Politics in a Changing World

3 Credits

American politics and policies examined from a historical and global perspective. Philosophical underpinnings of American national government, the structure of government based on that philosophy, and the practical implications of both the philosophical and structural base. How American government influences and is influenced by the world community.

HON 265G. Principles of Human Communication Honors

3 Credits

Study and practice of interpersonal, small group, and presentational skills essential to effective social, business, and professional interaction.

HON 270G. Theatre: Beginnings to Broadway

3 Credits

Intercultural and historical overview of live theatre production and performance, including history, literature and professionals. Students attend and report on stage productions.

HON 304V. Dilemmas of War and Peace

3 Credits

A multi-disciplinary introduction to war, peace, and world order studies. The origins of war and the foundations of peace are explored in the context of a rapidly changing world order.

HON 305V. Global Environment

3 Credits

Covers global environmental problems with focus on causes and possible solutions.

HON 306V. Science, Ethics and Society

3 Credits

Investigation of the ethical issues related to scientific investigation and the ethical implications of scientific discoveries for society. Emphasis on discussion of case studies about specific ethical issues in science, and readings by both scientists and non-scientists.

HON 308V. Into the Final Frontier

3 Credits

Exploration of space; a brief review of the history of space flight, the Apollo program, joint U.S.-Soviet space missions, and unstaffed exploration of the planets. Emphasis on knowledge gained through these efforts. Includes new space initiatives.

HON 313. Research and Writing

3 Credits

Workshop format designed to prepare students for research and writing associated with production of an honors thesis or a major research assignment. Does not count for general education or honors certification credit.

HON 314. Successful Fellowship Writing

1 Credit

Provides scholars with hands-on skills to complete proposals for scholarships and fellowships, such as the Truman, Rhodes, Marshall, Goldwater, Udall, and others. Other skills include how to write resumes, develop general research skills, and find grant and foundation sources.

HON 318V. The World of Cinema

3 Credits

Appreciation of the art of motion pictures as world-wide medium specific to national cultures. Refinement of cinematic literacy and critical viewing skills. Historical and thematic overview emphasizes collaborative nature of medium in various genres from 1895 to present. Selected films from different periods and different countries. Substantial library research projects.

HON 321V. Agriculture in an Interconnected World

3 Credits

Study of the impact of agriculture on cultural and social systems, with special emphasis on twentieth century urban development.

HON 324V. Science and the Arts: Theatre and Story

3 Credits

This course examines present day relations between the sciences and the representation and communication of science, especially in connection with theatre, narrative fiction, and autobiography. Crosslisted with: THTR329.

HON 326V. Art and Mythology

3 Credits

Mythological figures, past and present, in the visual arts. Through iconographical studies (attributes and symbols), trace the development of visual traditions that evolved from the literary sources of classical Mediterranean mythology.

HON 328V. Rock History: 20th Century Popular Music

3 Credits

Evolution of popular music in the 20th Century. Examines the history of popular music conventions, influences, and breakthroughs through the 20th Century. Topics include the originations of major music styles and their evolution as cultivated by key artists, scientific advancements, and sociopolitical change, contextualized within the contemporaneous history. Of particular concern are the influences of groundbreaking artists; the effect of evolving playback electronics, recording devices, and musical instruments; and the interplay between music and economic depression, war, civil rights, sexual revolution, and other sociopolitical events.

HON 335V. Legal Issues in Modern Society

3 Credits

Case study approach to contemporary legal problems involving environment, consumer protection, international law, corporate responsibility.

HON 336. Latina Feminisms: Testimonios from the Borderlands

3 Credits

This course is about the testimonies and autobiographical writings of and by Latinas in the United States. Life stories are told through many forms: "testimonios," memoirs, autobiographies and autobiographical fiction, oral histories and short stories, poetry and poetic prose pieces, essays, and audio-stories. Drawing from these sources of knowledge, we will explore feminist epistemologies and cast a critical eye on traditional knowledge claims and objectivity. The course focuses on Chicana/Latina feminist theories, the empirical educational research that draws upon these theories, and testimonios as method, epistemology, and pedagogy. Among the questions we will examine will be those concerning knowledge production, sexual politics, the mind-body-spirit connection, voice, representation, and truth.

HON 340V. Indian Law and Policy

3 Credits

Explores the principles, doctrines, and texts governing the legal relations between the United States and Indian tribes, the history of federal Indian law and policy, tribal property, treaty rights and sovereignty, congressional plenary power, the trust doctrine, jurisdiction in Indian country, and tribal government. Topic specifically examined in the course include tribal lawmaking powers, gaming and economic development in Indian country, protection of Indian religious rights and cultural property, water rights, fishing, hunting and other treaty-based rights.

HON 341V. The Old Testament as Literature

3 Credits (3)

Old Testament surveys a portion of the thirty-nine canonical books of the Old Testament from a literary approach, centered on the so-called historical-critical method that developed in the 19th C under such figures as Julius Wellhausen. Higher criticism of the texts, their sources, authorship, dating and interdependency has led to deepened insights as well as scholarly conflict. In addition, we will examine several apocryphal books that have continuing importance in our understanding of Old Testament. We will read the Old Testament along with an introduction and some supplementary materials.

HON 347V. World Dance

3 Credits

Examination of dance forms from a cross-cultural perspective, focusing on the role of dance in different cultures around the globe. Same as DANC 451V with differential assignments for Honors students.

HON 348V. Comparative Mythology: Myth, Ritual, and the Life Cycle

3 Credits

Exploration of the central myths of several religious traditions and investigation of how each, through ritual, has given meaning to key moments in the journey of the individual through life.

HON 349V. Islam and the West: Cultural Contacts, Conflicts, and Exchanges

3 Credits

This course examines interactions, encounters and cross-fertilization between the Islamic world and the West from the 7th -21st century. It begins with the origins of Islam and its relationship to Judaism and Christianity and ends in the post 9/11 present, an era some characterize as dominated by a "clash of civilizations."

HON 351V. Interpersonal Relations and the Self

3 Credits

Course explores the ways in which culture influences interpersonal relations and conceptions of the self. The course considers a variety of issues such as: interpersonal communications, self-awareness, self-disclosure, non-verbal behavior, intimacy, love, trust, jealousy, conflict management, self-management, culturally determined views of the self, self-presentation, and self-identity. Differences between the way the issues are viewed by different groups within our society, as well as between societies, will be considered.

HON 353V. Justice without Prejudice

3 Credits

Exploration of central questions about race, ethnicity, and justice. Students will learn to argue persuasively from different perspectives, both orally and in writing.

HON 362V. Native American Philosophy and Spirituality

3 Credits

Survey of philosophical traditions of Indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere. This course examines various forms of spiritual expression which encompasses art, dance, music, political/social activism, and the relationship to land. This course looks at present-day spiritual issues and on-going practices in Native America.

HON 365V. African and Caribbean: Literature and Film

3 Credits

Selected films and literary works shaped by colonial and post-colonial experiences in contemporary Africa and the Caribbean. Focus on the ongoing search for alternative identities in the form of a decolonized literature and culture.

HON 366V. The Gothic Imagination

3 Credits

Introduction to Gothic literature from its beginnings in the late eighteenth century that focuses on the political, psychological, religious, social, and familial values this literary genre explores and questions.

HON 370V. Design: The Creative Act

3 Credits

Explores the nature of design and what it means to design in various diverse media. Included are creative efforts in writing, art, music, and technology. Commonalities and differences are considered.

HON 371V. Paris: Beyond the Eiffel Tower

3 Credits (3+3P)

This interdisciplinary course focues on the evolution of the city of Paris from its earliest beginnings in the fifth century to modern times. Through the use of histroical, political, sociological and artistic texts and films, we will explore the various narratives which emerge from the built environment of Paris as well as its mythic status as the "City of Light and Romance" and "Capital of Revolution., Modernity and Art."

HON 374V. The European City: History and Culture

3 Credits

Historical overview of development, growth, and culture of European cities.

HON 375V. The U.S. City: A History of Race, Space, and Urbanization

3 Credits

This course takes the city as a starting point to understand larger social and political developments in the United States. Processes of segregation and exclusion have placed people of color in the United States on the periphery of social, cultural and geographical power in the nation. We will explore how Asian Americans, Latinas/os, and African Americans have navigated, created, and made sense of urban environments. Students will learn to interpret space for evidence of past and present social relationships, including how race intersects with gender, class, sexuality, and nation.

HON 377V. Freedom of Speech and the Law

3 Credits

Examination of freedom of speech and of press both in the United States and in other societies. Examines a wide range of laws, court rulings and regulatory schemes covering areas such as defamation, sedition, and regulation of broadcasting and advertising.

HON 378V. Technology and Policy

3 Credits

Study of the processes through which society sets goals for science and technology, of the allocation of resources needed to achieve these goals, and of the obligations and conflicts that develop as the goals are realized. International comparisons of public policies.

HON 379V. Literature as Film

3 Credits

Considers the various results of literary adaptations to the screen. Participants will read literary texts written or translated into English and watch films from various countries as illustrations of this process.

HON 380V. Comparative Economic Systems

3 Credits

A global comparison of economic institutions and problems.

HON 381V. Economic Development of Latin America

3 Credits

Economic analysis of problems related to development in Latin America, including the agrarian problem, debt and austerity programs, industrialization, inflation and unemployment, the drug trade, U.S.-Latin American relations, development strategies. Also individual counties' problems.

Prerequisite(s): 3.2 cumulative GPA.

HON 384V. Ethical Decisions in Organizations

3 Credits

Examines ethical decisions in business, non-profit, and governmental organizations from a managerial perspective. Topics include ethical principles, recognition and application of principle-based ethics, stakeholders in ethical decisions, and analysis of the consistency between organizational decisions and ethical principles.

HON 385V. Consumers and the Law

3 Credits

A study of the multidisciplinary synergism of law, societal concerns, business, and ethics of consumer issues and attendant liability and remedies for the domestic and international markets.

HON 387V. Comparative Perspectives on Women

3 Credits

The history, antecedents, and consequences of sex and gender systems around the world from the perspective of sociology, anthropology, and psychology.

HON 388V. Leadership and Society

3 Credits

Exploration of the multifaceted nature of leadership in modern society through readings and seminar discussion.

HON 390. Worlds of Buddhism

3 Credits (3)

This course is an introduction to Buddhism and its contribution to the formation of (East) Asian cultures. It provides students with Buddhist and (East) Asian “case studies” - i.e., examples of the ways in which Buddhism has influenced, and has been influenced by, the region’s various cultural and social milieus over time. The course is designed to offer opportunities to critically reflect on Buddhism as a transformative philosophical, cultural and individual system. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

HON 394V. Southwestern and Border Literature

3 Credits

Introduction to the culturally diverse literature of the American Southwest and borderlands region. Class analyzes evolution of the Southwest concept and considers degree to which the existence of a borderlands culture is manifest in literature.

Prerequisite: honors eligibility.

HON 400. Honors Thesis

3 Credits

Independent-study research and writing project to be carried out under the supervision of a faculty member.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

HON 410. Honors Internship

3-6 Credits

Assignments in departments to be supervised by faculty in the area. A cumulative 3.5 GPA is required. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be repeated up to 12 credits. Consent of Instructor required.

HON 411V. Great Theorems: The Art of Mathematics

3 Credits

Same as MATH 411G.

HON 420. Independent Studies

1-3 Credits

Directed, individual studies and projects.

Prerequisites: consent of instructor and honors eligibility.

HON 421. Special Topics

1-3 Credits

Special course offerings, with specific titles listed in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Consent of Instructor required. Crosslisted with: EDUC 317V.

HON 422. Directed Research

3 Credits

Individual research projects supervised by faculty advisers. Consent of instructor required.

HON 425V. Magic and Witchcraft in Medieval and Renaissance

3 Credits

Examines the history of popular and scientific beliefs about magic and witchcraft in medieval and early modern Europe. Topics include the origins of the occult sciences in the West, Arabic sources of medieval magic, the occult sciences in scholasticism, witchcraft and medieval theology, the witch hunts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and the decline of belief in magic and witchcraft in the seventeenth century. Of particular concern are the boundaries that defined and separated magic, science, and religion in western thought from late antiquity through the Scientific Revolution. Same as HIST 425 with differential assignments for HON 425 students. Crosslisted with: HIST 425.

HON 450V. The Sundt Honors Seminar

3 Credits

The Sundt Honors Seminar is a unique, experience-based, interdisciplinary seminar developed and taught by the holder of the Sundt Honors Professorship for the year. The subject of the course will vary according to the discipline of the Sundt Professor. The course may include a travel experience related to the seminar topic, hosting of outside specialists, or other unique activity. Open to students by application. Students selected for the course are named Sundt Scholars.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 111G or equivalent.

HON 521. Special Topics

3 Credits

Graduate level to be cross-listed with HON 421 Special Topics at the undergraduate level.