CAST-CHILD ADVOCACY STUDIES

CAST 1110. Introduction to Child Advocacy

3 Credits (3)

This is the introductory course for child advocacy studies (CAST). It covers different models for understanding child maltreatment, types and indicators of child maltreatment, controversial topics in the field, and issues and laws related to child maltreatment in various countries around the world. Students will develop critical thinking and analytical skills in assessing child maltreatment. Restricted to Dona Ana campus only.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate how to apply a model of critical thinking and analysis to child maltreatment issues.
  2. Describe historical trends in child maltreatment and child advocacy.
  3. Compare and contrast theories and models of child maltreatment.
  4. Compare and contrast the indicators and consequences of different types of maltreatment.
  5. Discuss cultural issues related to assessing and working with families.

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CAST 2110. Professional and Systems Responses to Child Maltreatment

3 Credits (3)

Course examines the professionals and systems that respond to allegations of child abuse and neglect. Includes the differences between civil and criminal proceedings; components of a court-worthy child abuse and neglect investigation; basicc child forensic interviewing; an overview of child sex offenders; and current research and controversial issues affecting the field. Restricted to Dona Ana campus only.

Prerequisite(s): CAST 1110.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Define neglect, abuse, and violence including psychological, emotional, and spiritual maltreatment.
  2. Describe the interpersonal dynamic of violence and abuse, and the varied and changing types of violence and abuse.
  3. Identify risk factors for various categories of child abuse in the general population and identify high-risk population.
  4. Describe the physical and behavioral health effects of violence, neglect, and abuse, including mental health impacts.
  5. Identify the barriers to help-seeking for victimized children.
  6. Describe models for intervention and prevention of child maltreatment.
  7. Discuss various factors that affect children’s motivation for disclosure.
  8. Discuss how values, attitudes, beliefs, and experiences related to child maltreatment may effect interaction with children and families
  9. Describe best practice in the investigation of maltreatment reports.
  10. 1 Identify methods utilized to evaluate the credibility of witnesses.
  11. 1 Describe the processes of collecting corroborative evidence beyond “hard science” items such as DNA.
  12. 1 Identify strategies for engaging non offending caregivers in providing appropriate support for children who have disclosed maltreatment.
  13. 1 Identify commonly available community resources that may ensure a safe environment for children disclosing maltreatment.
  14. 1 Describe strategies for engaging appropriate professionals to ensure children’s' well-being following a disclosure of maltreatment.
  15. 1 Discuss cultural or developmental factors that may impact the well-being of children reporting maltreatment.
  16. 1 Discuss the scope of confidentiality in child maltreatment cases.
  17. 1 Describe why all children's safety should be the priority during an investigation.
  18. 1 Describe the typology of sex offenders in child maltreatment cases.
  19. 1 Define the grooming process used by sex offenders.
  20. 2 Discuss circumstances that may cause children to recant the disclosure of child maltreatment.
  21. 2 Discuss how values, attitudes, beliefs, and experiences related to child maltreatment may effect interaction with children and families.
  22. 2 Describe legislative and agency mandates of common MDT team members.
  23. 2 Discuss the scope of authority and resources among MDT members.
  24. 2 Discuss the importance of maintaining appropriate professional boundaries between team members.
  25. 2 Identify the kinds of information that must be shared within the MDT team during an investigation or litigation.
  26. 2 Identify common educational resources needed by MDTs.
  27. 2 Describe ways to engage community stakeholders in preventing, investigating, and intervening in cases of child maltreatment.
  28. 2 Accurately describe the steps in the process following a report of child maltreatment.
  29. 2 Describe common questions asked by children and families during a child abuse investigation and provide possible answers.
  30. 3 Discuss the various members of the family systems who may be involved in child maltreatment cases and describe what information will be important to them.
  31. 3 Identify the professionals who should be involved in working with the family system during an investigation.
  32. 3 Describe the importance of providing frequent updates to the family system during the investigation, and provide several examples of how the family system could be kept informed.
  33. 3 Describe how the legal process works in both civil and criminal proceedings.
  34. 3 Explain how community awareness of the MDT process can foster a positive attitude toward reporting child maltreatment.
  35. 3 Discuss how to educate community organizations on how they can help foster resiliency in child victims and their families.
  36. 3 Explain the importance of community engagement in reporting and responding to child maltreatment as well as prevention efforts.
  37. 3 Identify and describe state laws that govern confidentiality with respect to reporting of child maltreatment and its exceptions.
  38. 3 Discuss the importance of professional honesty in working with children involved in cases of maltreatment.
  39. 3 Describe the ethical guidelines of common disciplines involved in MDTs, and identify possible conflicts for each.

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CAST 2120. Prevention, Trauma Informed Treatment and Advocacy

3 Credits (3)

The purpose of this course is to prepare students to recognize the effects of child maltreatment and apply interventions strategies for children and their families. Multidisciplinary approaches to prevention, advocacy and treatment of child maltreatment survivors will be presented and discussed. Topics include violence prevention research, interdisciplinary family programs, how to advocate for survivors of child abuse, case management, working with families, mental health service and controversial issues.

Prerequisite(s): CAST 1110.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Be able to create goals and identify services needed by maltreating families.
  2. Understand the development of psychopathology in the child related to maltreatment
  3. Understand the documented effects of maltreatment such as depression, anxiety, sexualized behavior, neurobiological, suicide, and damaged ego development/ sense of self
  4. Describe interdisciplinary family intervention programs such as in-home parenting programs, Stay Safe program, Incredible Years, Project Safe Care, ECFE, etc.
  5. Explain mental health assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and availability of services for the survivor, the family and the offender.
  6. Understand PTSD, reactive attachment disorder and other trauma responses; assessment and treatment
  7. Describe issues for adolescent and adult survivors of maltreatment such as eating disorders, low self-esteem and personality disorders.
  8. Identify professional issues related to maltreatment such as how to approach families and an awareness of the effect of working with families on the professional.
  9. Discuss the role of interdisciplinary approaches to child maltreatment intervention in planning for the future and advocating for the rights of children
  10. 1 Explain violence prevention research, strategies, and programs
  11. 1 Understand how battering, chemical dependency/maltreatment, mental illness, chronic illnesses, disabilities, and other family stressors influence intervention with survivors, their families and the offender
  12. 1 Explain how issues of race, class, sexual orientation, religion, gender and social justice can influence professional practice with children who have been maltreated
  13. 1 Explain the role of the child advocate in addressing social justice issues associated with intervention and prevention of child maltreatment, and in promoting social change that will result in fewer incidents of child maltreatment.

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CAST 301V. Introduction to Child Advocacy

3 Credits (3)

Historical review and evolution of child welfare policies, initiatives and factors that influence child welfare service. Child welfare policies and services specific to the state of New Mexico are infused throughout the course. Taught with MSW 590. Cannot receive credit for CAST 301 and MSW 590.

CAST 302. Professional and Systems Responses to Child Maltreatment

3 Credits (3)

Course examines the professionals and systems that respond to allegations of child abuse and neglect. Includes the differences between civil and criminal proceedings; components of a court-worthy child abuse and neglect investigation; basic child forensic interviewing; an overview of child sex offenders; current research and controversial issues effecting the field. Students majoring in social work, criminal justice, education, sociology, psychology, nursing, and other areas will enhance their capacity to strengthen the safety net that protects children.

Prerequisite(s): CAST 301V.

CAST 303. Prevention, Trauma Informed Treatment and Advocacy

3 Credits (3)

The purpose of this course is to prepare students to recognize the effects of child maltreatment and to apply intervention strategies for children and their families. Multidisciplinary approaches to prevention, advocacy, and treatment of child maltreatment survivors will be presented and discussed. Topics include violence prevention research, interdisciplinary family programs, how to advocate for survivors of child abuse, short- and long-term effects of child abuse, case management, working with families, mental health services and controversial issues. Crosslisted with: FCST 300

Prerequisite(s): CAST 301V.

CAST 501. Introduction to Child Advocacy

3 Credits (3)

This is the introductory course for child advocacy studies (CAST). It covers different models for understanding child maltreatment, types and indicators of child maltreatment, controversial topics in the field, and issues and laws related to child maltreatment in various countries around the world. Students will develop critical thinking and analytical skills in assessing child maltreatment at the graduate level.