HIST-HISTORY (HIST)

HIST 1105G. Making History

3 Credits (3)

General introduction to history: how historians carry out research and develop interpretations about the past.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand and articulate the differences and similarities between history and memory;
  2. Analyze and critically interpret primary sources and understand how others might interpret and use the same material in different ways;
  3. Recognize and appreciate the diversity of historical experiences and the uses of historical memory in various societies;
  4. Understand how historical experiences that include political, geographical, social, cultural, religious and intellectual experiences have been expressed across historical periods;
  5. Understand how historical experiences and memories have shaped contemporary societies;
  6. Identify and understand the degree to which history has been used and misused in the past;
  7. Demonstrate improvement in their ability to read critically, think logically, and express themselves clearly in writing.

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HIST 1110G. United States History I

3 Credits (3)

The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to the history of the United States from the pre-colonial period to the immediate aftermath of the Civil War. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of the United States within the context of world societies.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to explain in their work how humans in the past shaped their own unique historical moments and were shaped by those moments, and how those cultures changed over the course of the centuries for the history of the United States from the pre-colonial period to the immediate aftermath of the Civil War. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember and Understand
  2. Students will distinguish between primary and secondary sources, identify and evaluate evidence and empathize with people in their historical context. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Analyze, Remember, Evaluate, Create
  3. Students will summarize and appraise different historical interpretations and evidence in order to construct past events. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Understand, Evaluate, Apply
  4. Students will identify historical arguments in a variety of sources and explain how they were constructed, evaluating credibility, perspective, and relevance. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember, Understand, Evaluate
  5. Students will create well-supported historical arguments and narratives that demonstrate an awareness of audience. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Create, Apply 8
  6. Students will APPLY historical knowledge and historical thinking “in order to infer what drives and motivates human behavior in both past and present.” Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Apply, Analyze 9

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HIST 1120G. United States History II

3 Credits (3)

The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to the history of the United States from reconstruction to the present. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of the United States within the context of world societies.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to explain in their work how humans in the past shaped their own unique historical moments and were shaped by those moments, and how those cultures changed over the course of the centuries for the history of the United States from the reconstruction to the present. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember and Understand
  2. Students will distingusih between primary and secondary sources, identify and evaluate evidence and empathize with people in their historical context. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Analyze, Remember, Evaluate, Create
  3. Students will summarize and appriase different historical interpretations and evidence in order to construct past events. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Understand, Evaluate, Apply
  4. Students will identify historical arguments in a variety of sources and explain how they were constructed, evaluating credibility, perspective, and relevance. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember, Understand, Evaluate
  5. Students will create well-supported historical arguments and narratives that demonstrate an awareness of audience. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Create, Apply
  6. Students will apply historical knowledge and historical thinking “inorder to infer what drives and motivates human behavior in both past and present.” Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Apply, Analyze 10 11

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HIST 1130G. World History I

3 Credits (3)

The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to global history from the 16th century to the present. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of world societies.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to explain in their work how humans in the past shaped their own unique historical moments and were shaped by those moments, and how those cultures changed over the course of the centuries for global history from ancient times to the 16th century. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember and Understand
  2. Students will distinguish between primary and secondary sources, identify and evaluate evidence and empathize with people in their historical context. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Aanalyze, Remember, Evaluate, Create
  3. Students will summarize and appraise different historical interpretations and evidence in order to construct past events. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Understand, Evaluate, Apply
  4. Students will identify historical arguments in a variety of sources and explain how they were constructed, evaluating credibility, perspective, and relevance. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember, Understand, Evaluate
  5. Students will create well-supported historical arguments and narratives that demonstrate an awareness of audience. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Create, Apply
  6. Students will apply historical knowledge and historical thinking “in order to infer what drives and motivates human behavior in both past and present.” Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Apply, Analyze 12

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HIST 1140G. World History II

3 Credits (3)

The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to global history from ancient times to the 16th century. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of world societies.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to explain in their work how humans in the past shaped their own unique historical moments and were shaped by those moments, and how those cultures changed over the course of the centuries for the history of global history from the 16th century to the present. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember and Understand
  2. Students will distinguish between primary and secondary sources, identify and evaluate evidence and empathize with people in their historical context. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Analyze, Remember, Evaluate, Create
  3. Students will summarize and appraise different historical interpretations and evidence in order to construct past events. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Understand, Evaluate, Apply
  4. Students will identify historical arguments in a variety of sources and explain how they were constructed, evaluating credibility, perspective, and relevance. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember, Understand, Evaluate
  5. Students will create well-supported historical arguments and narratives that demonstrate an awareness of audience. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Create, Apply
  6. Students will Apply historical knowledge and historical thinking “in order to infer what drives and motivates human behavior in both past and present.” Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Apply, Analyze 13

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HIST 1150G. Western Civilization I

3 Credits (3)

This course is a chronological treatment of the history of the western world from ancient times to the early modern era. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of western civilization within the context of world societies. Selective attention will be given to "non-western" civilizations which impact and influence the development of "western" civilization.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to explain in their work how humans in the past shaped their own unique historical moments and were shaped by those moments, and how those cultures changed over the course of the centuries for the history of the western world from ancient times to the early modern era. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember and Understand
  2. Students will distinguish between primary and secondary sources, identify and evaluate evidence and empathize with people in their historical context. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Analyze, Remember, Evaluate, Create
  3. Students will summarize and appraise different historical interpretations and evidence in order to
  4. construct past events. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Understand, Evaluate, Apply
  5. Students will identify historical arguments in a variety of sources and explain how they were constructed, evaluating credibility, perspective, and relevance. BloomTaxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember, Understand, Evaluate
  6. Students will create well-supported historical arguments and narratives that demonstrate an awareness of audience. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Create, Apply
  7. Students will apply historical knowledge and historical thinking “in order to infer what drives and motivates human behavior in both past and present.” Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Apply, Analyze 14

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HIST 1160G. Western Civilization II

3 Credits (3)

This course is a chronological treatment of the history of the western world from the early modern era to the present. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of western civilization within the context of world societies. Selective attention will be given to "non-western" civilizations which impact and influence the development of "western" civilization.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to explain in their work how humans in the past shaped their own unique historical moments and were shaped by those moments, and how those cultures changed over the course of the centuries for the history of the western world from the early modern era to the present. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember and Understand
  2. Students will distinguish between primary and secondary sources, identify and evaluate evidence and empathize with people in their historical context. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Analyze, Remember, Evaluate, Create
  3. Students will summarize and appraise different historical interpretations and evidence in order to construct past events. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Understand, Evaluate, Apply
  4. Students will identify historical arguments in a variety of sources and explain how they were constructed, evaluating credibility, perspective, and relevance. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember, Understand, Evaluate
  5. Students will create well-supported historical arguments and narratives that demonstrate an awareness of audience. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Create, Apply
  6. Students will apply historical knowledge and historical thinking “in order to infer what drives and motivates human behavior in both past and present.” Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Apply, Analyze

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HIST 1170. Survey of Early Latin America

3 Credits (3)

The primary objective of this course is to serve as a survey of the history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times through independence. This course will explore the contributions of Indigenous peoples, Africans, and Europeans to the creation of Latin America’s diverse societies. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential to the understanding of the history of Latin America within the context of world societies.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to explain in their work how humans in the past shaped their own unique historical moments and were shaped by those moments, and how those cultures changed over the course of the centuries for the history of Latin America from independence to the present.
  2. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember and Understand
  3. Students will distinguish between primary and secondary sources, identify and evaluate evidence and empathize with people in their historical context.
  4. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: analyze, remember, evaluate, create
  5. Students will summarize and appraise different historical interpretations and evidence in order to construct past events.
  6. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: understand, evaluate, apply
  7. Students will identify historical arguments in a variety of sources and explain how they were constructed, evaluating credibility, perspective, and relevance.
  8. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: remember, understand, evaluate
  9. Students will create well-supported historical arguments and narratives that demonstrate an awareness of audience.
  10. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: create. apply
  11. Students will apply historical knowledge and historical thinking “in order to infer what drives and motivates human behavior in both past and present.”
  12. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: apply, analyze

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HIST 1180. Survey of Modern Latin America

3 Credits (3)

The primary objective of this course is to serve as a survey of the history of Latin America from independence to the present. This course will explore the contributions of Indigenous peoples, Africans, and Europeans to the creation of Latin America’s diverse societies. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential to the understanding of the history of Latin America within the context of world societies.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to explain in their work how humans in the past shaped their own unique historical moments and were shaped by those moments, and how those cultures changed over the course of the centuries for the history of Latin America from independence to the present.
  2. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember and Understand
  3. Students will distinguish between primary and secondary sources, identify and evaluate evidence and empathize with people in their historical context.
  4. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: analyze, remember, evaluate, create
  5. Students will summarize and appraise different historical interpretations and evidence in order to construct past events.
  6. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: understand, evaluate, apply
  7. Students will identify historical arguments in a variety of sources and explain how they were constructed, evaluating credibility, perspective, and relevance.
  8. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: remember, understand, evaluate
  9. Students will create well-supported historical arguments and narratives that demonstrate an awareness of audience.
  10. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: create. apply
  11. Students will apply historical knowledge and historical thinking “in order to infer what drives and motivates human behavior in both past and present.”
  12. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: apply, analyze

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HIST 2110. Survey of New Mexico History

3 Credits (3)

The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to the history of New Mexico from the pre- Columbian times to the present day. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of New Mexico within the context of the Americas.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will be able to explain in their work how humans in the past shaped their own unique historical moments and were shaped by those moments, and how those cultures changed over the course of the centuries for the history of New Mexico from pre-Columbian times to the present day. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember and Understand
  2. Students will distinguish between primary and secondary sources, identify and evaluate evidence and empathize with people in their historical context. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Analyze, Remember, Evaluate, Create
  3. Students will summarize and appraise different historical interpretations and evidence in order to construct past events. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Understand, Evaluate, Apply
  4. Students will identify historical arguments in a variety of sources and explain how they were constructed, evaluating, credibility, perspective, and relevance. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Remember, Understand, Evaluate
  5. Students will create well-supported historical arguments and narratives that demonstrate an awareness of audience. Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Create, Apply
  6. Students will apply historical knowledge and historical thinking “in order to infer what drives and motivates human behavior in both past and present.” Bloom Taxonomy’s Cognitive Process: Apply, Analyze 16

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HIST 2245G. Islamic Civilizations to 1800

3 Credits (3)

History of Islamic civilizations to 1800.

Learning Outcomes
  1. By the conclusion of the course, the student will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the history of cultural encounters, exchanges, and conflicts between the Islamic world and the West from the seventh to the sixteenth century;
  2. Be able to evaluate the major themes of cultural contact, conflict, and interchange between the Islamic world and the West;
  3. Critically read and evaluate historical evidence with the goal of forming an argument about historical evidence
  4. Communicate a historical argument logically, clearly, and effectively in writing.

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HIST 2246G. Islamic Civilizations since 1800

3 Credits (3)

History of Islamic civilizations since 1800.

Learning Outcomes
  1. By the conclusion of the course, the student will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the history of cultural encounters, exchanges, and conflicts between the Islamic world and the West from the sixteenth century;
  2. Be able to evaluate the major themes of cultural contact, conflict, and interchange between the Islamic world and the West;
  3. Critically read and evaluate historical evidence with the goal of forming an argument about historical evidence
  4. Communicate a historical argument logically, clearly, and effectively in writing.

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HIST 2250G. East Asia to 1600

3 Credits (3)

History of China, Korea, Vietnam, and Japan from earliest times through the sixteenth century. Emphasis on cultural and political developments and their social and economic contexts, and the interaction between East Asian societies.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will learn the analytic skills of interpreting historical changes and continuity.
  2. They will assess and use historical documents, and learn how to evaluate varying historical interpretations.
  3. Students will understand the chronological and geographic context of important historical events,and will understand the social, technological, economic, cultural and political components of the society under study in this course.
  4. Students will understand how people shape their culture and its beliefs, and the way in which prevailing cultures and beliefs shape them.
  5. They will understand the historical origins of present-day societies, to learn about their own historical roots.
  6. They will learn about the development of structures of power, the production of and distribution of goods, and the relationship between science and technology and human values and behavior.

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HIST 2251G. East Asia since 1600

3 Credits (3)

History of China, Korea, Vietnam, and Japan from the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries. Emphasis on internal development of each country, as well as the social and political impact of Western Imperialism, and the emergence of each country's unique version of modern society.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Students will learn the analytical skills of interpreting historical changes and continuity.
  2. They will assess and use historical documents, and learn how to evaluate varying historical interpretations.
  3. Students will understand the chronological and geographic context of important historical events, and will understand the social, technological, economic, cultural and political components of the society under study in this course.
  4. Students will understand how people shape their culture and its beliefs, and the way in which prevailing cultures and beliefs shape them.
  5. They will understand the historical origins of present-day societies, to learn about their own historical roots.
  6. They will learn about the development of structures of power, the production of and distribution of goods, and the relationship between science and technology and human values and behavior.

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HIST 2996. Special Topics

1-3 Credits

Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Community Colleges only. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Varies

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